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Political Map of Pakistan – Nations Online Project

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  • Summary: Articles about Political Map of Pakistan – Nations Online Project The map shows Pakistan, a country located in the northwest of the Indian subcontinent in South Asia. The Muslim nation’s official name is the Islamic …

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    Cloudflare Ray ID: 6ffa54450eb93d9a

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Map India and Pakistan 1:250000. 314 maps – Library of …

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  • Summary: Articles about Map India and Pakistan 1:250000. 314 maps – Library of … 314 maps digitized and available on American Memory website. … Map India and Pakistan 1:250,000. 314 maps.

  • Match the search results: United States Army Map Service. (1955) India and Pakistan 1:250,000. Washington. [Map] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/map56000567/.

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Line of Control – Wikipedia

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  • Summary: Articles about Line of Control – Wikipedia The Line of Control (LoC) is a military control line between the Indian and Pakistani … Political map of the Kashmir region showing the Line of Control (LoC).

  • Match the search results: The part of the former princely state under Indian control is divided into the union territories of Jammu and Kashmir and Ladakh. The Pakistani-controlled section is divided into Azad Kashmir and Gilgit–Baltistan. The northernmost point of the Line of Control is known as NJ9842, beyond which lies th…

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maps1947

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  • Summary: Articles about maps1947 The earliest proposed map of the “Pak Commonwealth of Nations,” c. … *INDIA IN 1946, SHOWING PRINCELY STATES AND OTHER POLITICAL BOUNDARIES* …

  • Match the search results: Source: Akbar S. Ahmed, “Jinnah, Pakistan, and Islamic Identity”
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    Routledge, 1997), p. xxvii; scan by FWP, Oct. 2007

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India and Pakistan AMS Topographic Maps – University of …

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  • Summary: Articles about India and Pakistan AMS Topographic Maps – University of … PCL Map Collection > India and Pakistan AMS Topographic Maps. India and Pakistan 1:250,000. Series U502, U.S. Army Map Service, 1955-.

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File:India Pakistan China Disputed Areas Map.png

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  • Summary: Articles about File:India Pakistan China Disputed Areas Map.png English: Composite map showing the borders of India, Pakistan & China as per official sources overlaid on areas of actual administrative control.

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A Fresh Start for Pakistan? | Origins

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  • Match the search results: Part of what it also called the India-Pakistan War of 1971, the Bangladesh Liberation War saw battles between India and Pakistan. This map shows approximate movements of military units.

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India hits back at new Pakistan map: ‘An exercise in political …

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  • Summary: Articles about India hits back at new Pakistan map: ‘An exercise in political … Pakistan on Tuesday released a new political map which depicts J&K as a disputed territory, and claims the regions of Sir Creek and the …

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India Bangladesh Pakistan Map Illustrations & Vectors

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  • Summary: Articles about India Bangladesh Pakistan Map Illustrations & Vectors Download 161 India Bangladesh Pakistan Map Stock Illustrations, Vectors & Clipart for FREE or amazingly low rates! New users enjoy 60% OFF.

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Google redraws the borders on maps depending on who’s …

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  • Summary: Articles about Google redraws the borders on maps depending on who’s … From Pakistan, Kashmir appears disputed. From India, it appears as a part of India. Google Maps changes disputed borders based on what …

  • Match the search results: SAN FRANCISCO — For more than 70 years, India and Pakistan have waged sporadic and deadly skirmishes over control of the mountainous region of Kashmir. Tens of thousands have died in the conflict, including three just this month.

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Multi-read content map of india and pakistan

Coordinates: 34°56′N 76°46′E / 34.933°N 76.767°E / 34.933; 76,767

line control
Kashmir Region Political Map with Line of Control (LoC)
highlighted
legal entity Pakistan India
length 740 km (460 mi)[1] to 776 km (482 mi)[2][a]
story
Found 2 July 1972 Results of the 17 December 1971 Armistice and after the ratification of the Shimla Treaty
pact The Simla Agreement

The United Nations map of the Line of Control

united nationSiachen Glacier

Thatline control(location) is a military line of control betweenIndianandPakistanipreviously controlled partsState of Jammu and Kashmir– A line that does not form a legally recognized international boundary, but serves as suchactuallyBorder. It was founded as part ofThe Simla AgreementAt the endThe Indo-Pakistani War of 1971. Both countries agreed to rename the ceasefire line to “line of control” and pledged to respect it without compromising their positions.[4]Apart from the small details, the lines are almost identical to the original1949 the Armistice Line.

Part of the private state formerly under Indian control is divided into Union TerritoriesJammu and KashmirandLadakh. The Pakistan-controlled part is divided intoAzad KashmirandGilgit-Baltistan. The northernmost point of the Line of Control is namedNJ9842, There are alsoSiachen Glacier, became a bone of contention in 1984. South of the Line of Control (Sangam, Chenab River,akhnoor), lies on the border betweenPakistani Punjaband Jammu Province, whose status is ambiguous: India considers this an “international border”, and Pakistan calls it a “labour border”.[5]

Another ceasefire line separating the Indian-controlled state of Jammu and Kashmir from Chinese-controlled territory is known as theAksai Chin. They say it’s further eastActual control line(LAC).[6]

  • 1. Background
  • 2 functions
  • 2.1 Terrain
    2.2 Violation of the Armistice
    2.3 Landmines and IEDs
    2.4 Items and Bunkers
    2.5 Indian LoC fencing
    2.6 Border Village
    2.7 Central Military Infiltration and Movement
    2.8 Intersections

    2.8.1 Chiliana – Teeth whale
    2.8.2 Chakothi – Salamabad
    2.8.3 Tetrinote – Chakan Da Bagh
    2.8.4 Tattapani Mendhar

  • 3 Effects on the civilian population
  • 4 In popular culture
  • 5 see more
  • 6 references
  • 7 Read More

background

Kashmir conflict

According todivision of India, today India and Pakistan dispute the independent nation ofJammu and Kashmir- India is joined by the ruler and Pakistan thanks to the state’s majority Muslim population. ThatFirst Kashmir War1947 lasted more than a year until the armistice was decidedUnited Nations mediation. Both sides have agreed on aarmistice line.[7]

After anothercashmere war1965 andThe Indo-Pakistani War of 1971(had seenBangladeshbecame independent), only minor changes were made to the original armistice line. Next timeThe Simla AgreementIn 1972 both countries agreed to convert the Armistice Line into the “Line of Control” (LoC) and to regard it as a de facto boundary from which armed actions must not be violated. The agreement states that “no party shall seek to unilaterally amend it, regardless of mutual differences and legal interpretations”.[8th][9]ThatUnited Nations Military Observer Group in India and Pakistan(UNMOGIP) played a role in investigating ceasefire violations (CFVs), but its role declined after 1971.[ten]In 2000 the President of the United States of Americabill clintonThe Indian subcontinent and the Kashmir Line of Control in particular is one of the most dangerous places on earth.[11][Twelfth]

highlighted

topographical

LoC wordKargilarriveGurezconsists of passes and valleys with small streams and rivers.[13]The area up to about 4,300 m (14,000 ft) is forested while the peaks are higher.[13]Winters are snowy while summers are mild. From Gurez toakhnoor, the area is hilly or generally wooded. There are railroad tracks and lanes connecting the settlements.[13]The combination of flora and altitude affects visibility andline of sightsignificant.[14]

violation of the armistice

In 2018, two corps and several battalions ofborder guard forceOperation of the Indian side of the LoC.[15]ThatRawalpindi’s Corpsoccupied on the Pakistani side.[15]The ceasefire violations (CFV’s) are initiated and committed by both sides and show proportionality.[16][17]Responding to a CFV in one location can result in firing in a completely different area.[18]Weapons used on LoC include small arms,rocket launcher,recoilless rifle,grenade launcher,automatic grenade launcher, rocket launchers and a number of other direct and indirect weapons.[19]Soldiers on both sides were at risk of being shot by snipers in moving vehicles, through peepholes in bunkers, and during meals.[20]

Civilian forces in the Mall, at several points along the front line, complicate the situation.[21]Shelling and shooting from both sides along the Mall resulted in the deaths of civilians.[22][23]Bunkers were built for these populations for protection during the CFV era.[24]India and Pakistan usually only report casualties on their own side of the LoC,[25]with the media blaming the other side for the shooting and each side claiming appropriate revenge.[26]

According to Happymon Jacob, reasons for the CFVs along the LoC include:[27]operational reasons (defense setup such as observation bases, gun laws, lack of bilateral border management mechanisms, personality traits and emotional states of soldiers and commanders),[28]political-strategic reasons,[29]Appropriate Response (Land Grab, Sniper Trigger, “I’m Better Than You”, Revenge Shot),[30]Accidental CFV (civil reference, location of line unclear)[thirty-one]and other reasons (like challenging teenagers, honor, prestige and humiliation, fun, gaming skills).[32]Jacob ranks operational reasons as the top cause of CFV, followed by strategic and political reasons.[27]

land mines and IED

In 1947, 1965, 1971 and 2001 mines were located beyond the India-Pakistan border and the World Trade Center.[33]The small space between the fences is mined with thousandsmine.[34]In2001–2002 impasse between India and PakistanThousands of acres along the LoC have been mined.[35]Both civilians and soldiers on both sides died in the mines andimprovised explosive deviceThe explosion involved (IED) and many others were injured.[35]Between January 2000 and April 2002, 138 Indian soldiers were killed.[35]

posts and bunkers

Reinforced concrete and sandbag posts and bunkers were among the first lines of defense along the LoC.[36][37]Armed soldiers took up these positions with enough supplies to last at least a week.[38]Posts and bunkers allowed soldiers to sleep, cook and watch enemy positions around the clock.[38]Some items are in remote locations. Animals are sometimes used to help transport goods, and some HQs keep animals.[38]The living quarters and forward-facing bunker are spaced apart.[39]The placement of some items does not follow a fixed plan, but they are in the positions usedFirst Kashmir Warand subsequent Armistice Line with minor adjustments in 1972.[40]

Indian LoC fencing

Diagram of Indian fencing relative to the zero line showing villages and bunkers and posts along the LoC

India has built a 550 km (340 mi) fence along 740 km (460 mi).[First]–776 kilometers (482 miles)[2]LoC in 2004.[41][42]The fence is generally still about 140 m (450 ft) long on the Indian-controlled side. Their stated goal is to stop arms smuggling and infiltration by Pakistan-born separatist fighters. The barrier, known as the Anti-Intrusion Obstacle System (AIOS), consists of a double fence andelastic cordHeight 8-12 feet (2.4-3.7 m) and iselectrifiedand connect to a network of motion sensors, thermal imaging devices, lighting systems and alarm systems. They act as a “quick warning signal” for the Indian military to alert and ambush intruders trying to sneak in.[43][44]

Construction of the fence began in the 1990s but slowed in the early 2000s due to increased hostilities between India and Pakistan. After the ceasefire in November 2003, construction resumed and was completed in late 2004. The LoC fence was completed on September 30, 2004 in the Kashmir Valley and Jammu region.[42]Based onIndian ArmyAccording to sources, the fence has reduced by 80% the number of militants regularly infiltrating the Indian side of the disputed area.[45]In 2017, a proposal for an improved smart fence was accepted from India.[44]

border village

Some villages are between the Indian fence and Line 0. Pakistan has not built a border fence, however, some villages are close to Line 0.[forty six]InsideTithwalarea there are 13 villages in front of the Indian fence.[forty six]The total number between the fence and the zero line on the Indian side is estimated at 60 villages and at least a million people scattered across districts adjacent to the center.RajouriarriveBandipora.[47]

Central military infiltration and movement

According to the Indian Ministry of Interior, 1,504 “terrorists” attempted to infiltrate India in 2002.[48]Infiltration was one of India’s major problems during this period2001–2002 impasse between India and Pakistan.[49]Penetration has steadily declined over the years. Few individuals are successfully selected; In 2016, the ministry reported 105 successful burglaries.[48]India’s LoC fence was built with a defensive mindset to resist intrusion.[50]Reducing infiltration also means reducing support for such activities in Pakistan.[51]InAir raid on Balakot 2019, Indian Aircraft passed the LoC for the first time in 48 years.[52]

intersection

[Interactive Full Screen Map]

Green pog.svg

Pakistan and India officially name the following five points of intersection2005 Kashmir earthquake—Nauseri-Tithwal; Chakoti Uri; Hajipur Uri; Rawalakot Poonch and Tattapani Mendhar.[53][54][55]

According to Azad Jammu and the Kashmir Cross LoC Tourism and Trade Authority Act, 2016, the following intersections are listed:[56][57]

  • Rawalakot—Poonch
  • Chakothi-Uri
  • Chaliana—Tithwal
  • Tatta Pani-Mendher
  • Haji Peer – Silli Kot

Transaction points include: Chakothi – Salamabad and Rawalakot (Titrinote) – Poonch (Chakkan-da-Bagh). The regulation was passed in 2011.[58][59]

Between 2005 and 2017, and according to Tourism and Trade Authority, Muzaffarabad, about 14,000 Kashmiri Indians entered Pakistan while about 22,000 passed through the Indian side.[60]Legal border crossing for civilians is not easy. Certain documents are required and verified by both countries, including proof of family status in the other.[sixty one]Even a brief, temporary sea crossing invites interrogation by government agencies.[sixty one]The Indian and Pakistani militaries use these hubs for chess meetings and sweet exchanges on special occasions and festivals.[62][63][sixty-four]On October 21, 2008, cross-China trade was conducted between the two sides for the first time in 61 years.[65]Transactions through the Trade Center are barter transactions.[66][sixty-seven]In ten years, the commercial value will be scarcePKR11,446 crore or5,000 crores(equivalent to 57 billion ($750 million in 2020 dollars) passed through the Chakothi – Salamabad crossing.[68]

Chilliana – Teeth whale

ThatTeewhalecrossing is crossingNeelum RiverbetweenMuzaffarabadandKupwara. It is normally only open during the summer months,[69]and unlike the other two crossings, which are only open to travelers, not trade.[57]Built in 1931, the Tithwal Bridge has been rebuilt twice.[70]

Chakothi-Salamabad

Salamabad Crossing or Kamran Post Office is on the middle lineChakothiandUriInsideBaramulla districtofJammu and Kashmiralong the LoC.[71][72]This is an important route for transcentral trade and tourism. Banking facilities and a trade facilitation center are planned on the Indian side.[seventy-three]The English name of the bridge in Uri means “prayer for peace. The Indian Army rebuilt it afterwards2005 Kashmir earthquakewhen a mountain on the Pakistani side has given way.[74]This route was opened to traffic in 2008 after 61 years of closure.[75]ThatBus Srinagar – MuzaffarabadCross this bridge on LoC.[76]

Tetrinote – Chakan Da Bagh

A connecting roadKotliandTatrine noteon the Pakistani side of the LoC for IndiaPoonch DistrictofJammu and Kashmirthrough the Chakan Da Bagh crossing.[72][77]This is an important route for transcentral trade and tourism. Banking facilities and a trade facilitation center are planned by the Indian side to benefit traders.[seventy-three]

Most of the flag raisings between the Indian and Pakistani security forces take place here.[78]

Tattapani Mendhar

The fourth boundary betweenTattapaniandMendharwas opened on November 14, 2005.[79]

concern of civilians

The Line of Control split Kashmir in two and closed off the Jhelum Valley route, the only way in and outKashmir Valleyout ofPakistani Punjab. This ongoing territorial division has divided many villages and separated family members.[80][81]Some families may see but not meet along the Mall in places like the Neelum River.[82]In certain locations, women on the Pakistani side of the LoC played an important role in influencing infiltration and ceasefire violations; Approaching directly the nearby Pakistani Army camps, they demanded a halt to the infiltration, which reduced Indian Cross-LoC firing.[83]

Pop Culture

LoC documentaries and related events includeVoyage across the Vitasta River,[84]Raja Shabir Khansline control[85]andStoryTV18’SKargil: Bravery[eighty-six]Some Bollywood movies further1999 Kargil conflictassociated descriptions and scenes of control lines includedLOC: Kargil (2003),[eighty seven] Lakshya (2004)[88]andGunjan Saxena: Kargil Girls (2020).[89]Other Bollywood films includeUri: OP strike (2019)[90]andBajrangi Bhaijaan (2015),[91]and stream TV shows such asAvrodh (2020).[92]

See more

  • Relations between India and Pakistan
  • Transportation between India and Pakistan
  • Current ground position line
  • – near the dividing line
  • Siachen Glacier

moderator

note

  1. ^
  2. 767 km long according to Mahmud Ali Durrani (2001) [3]

Quote

  1. ^ a b
  2. “LoC Statement”. Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Government of India. July 2, 1972. Original archived September 7, 2021. Accessed September 7, 2021. …thus clearly delineating the entire section of the control road, which extends 740 km, emanating from Sangam and terminating at Pt NJ-9842 will.
  3. ^ a b
  4. Arora
  5. ^
  6. Durrani 2001, p. 26
  7. ^
  8. Wiring 1998, p. 13: “With specific mention of Kashmir, they agree that: … in J
  9. ^
  10. Wiring 1998, p. ten.
  11. ^
  12. Wiring 1998, p. 20
  13. ^
  14. Wiring 1998, p. 4-7
  15. ^
  16. Wiring 1998, p. 13.
  17. ^
  18. “The Simla Agreement”. Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Government of India. 2 July 1972. Original archived 17 January 2016. Accessed 27 September 2013.
  19. ^
  20. Jacob, The Line of Control (2018), 110-111.
  21. ^
  22. Marcus, Jonathan (March 23, 2000). “Analysis: The most dangerous place on earth?”. BBC News. Original archived September 16, 2021. Accessed August 25, 2021.
  23. ^
  24. Krishnaswami, Sridhar (March 11, 2000). “‘The Most Dangerous Place'”. Hindus. ISSN 0971-751X. Original archived August 25, 2021. Accessed August 25, 2021.
  25. ^abc
  26. Durrani 2001, p. 27
  27. ^
  28. Durrani 2001, p. 39
  29. ^ a b
  30. Jacob, The Line of Control (2018), 109.
  31. ^
  32. Jacob, The Line of Control (2018), 145.
  33. ^
  34. Jacob, The Line of Control (2018), 86.
  35. ^
  36. Jacob, The Line of Control (2018), 85.
  37. ^
  38. Jacob, The Line of Control (2018), 18.
  39. ^
  40. Jacob, The Line of Control (2018), 82.
  41. ^
  42. Jacob, The Line of Control (2018), 113.
  43. ^
  44. Jacob, The Line of Control (2018), 96, 100.
  45. ^
  46. Siddiqui, Naveed (December 25, 2017). “3 Pakistani soldiers died in Indian Army ‘gratuitous’ Cross-LoC shooting: ISPR”. DUSK. Original archived August 30, 2021. Accessed August 30, 2021.
  47. ^
  48. “J
  49. ^
  50. Zakaria 2018, p. xxiv-xxv.
  51. ^
  52. Zakaria 2018, p. 17-18
  53. ^ a b
  54. Jacob, Line on Fire 2018, pp. 152–153.
  55. ^
  56. Jacob, Line on Fire 2018, pp. 158–180.
  57. ^
  58. Jacob, Line on Fire 2018, pp. 181–187.
  59. ^
  60. Jacob, Line on Fire 2018, pp. 187–202.
  61. ^
  62. Jacob, Line on Fire 2018, pp. 207-212.
  63. ^
  64. Jacob, Line on Fire 2018, pp. 202–207.
  65. ^
  66. Jacob, The Line of Control (2018), 97.
  67. ^
  68. Umar, Baba (April 30, 2011). “Innocents at War”. Tehelka. Originally archived October 17, 2011. Accessed October 7, 2011.
  69. ^abc
  70. Jacob, The Line of Control (2018), 98.
  71. ^
  72. Jacob, The Line of Control (2018), 148.
  73. ^
  74. AP (April 3, 2021). “Peace developments between Pakistan and India silence LoC”. DAWN.COM. Original archived August 30, 2021. Accessed August 30, 2021.
  75. ^abc
  76. Jacob, The Line of Control (2018), 148-149.
  77. ^
  78. Jacob, The Line of Control (2018), 150.
  79. ^
  80. Jacob, The Line of Control (2018), 151.
  81. ^
  82. Williams, Matthias (20 October 2008). Scrutton, Alistair (Editor). “FACTBOX line of control between India and Pakistan”. Reuters. Original archived August 25, 2021. Accessed August 25, 2021.
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  84. “LoC Fencing Completed: Mukherjee”. India period. December 16, 2004. Originally archived October 22, 2012.
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  86. Kumar, Vinay (February 1, 2004). “LoC fences in Jammu nearing completion”. Hindus. Original archived February 16, 2004. Accessed June 23, 2012.
  87. ^ a b
  88. Peri, Dinakar (April 30, 2017). “Army Installs Smart Fences Along LoC”. Hindus. ISSN 0971-751X. Original archived October 22, 2020. Accessed July 31, 2020.
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  90. Gilani, Iftikhar (March 4, 2005). “Bad weather can damage the LoC fence”. Daily newspaper. Original archived September 30, 2007. Accessed July 31, 2007.
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  92. Jacob, The Line of Control (2018), 155.
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  123. ^
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Binder

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  • Bharat, Meenakshi; Kumar, Nirmal, edit. (2012). Filming The Line of Control: The Indo-Pak Relationship Through the Cinematic Lens. Routledge. ISBN 9781136516061.
  • Budha, Kishore (2012), “1”, Genre Development in the Age of Markets and Nationalism: War Films
  • Jakob, Happymon (2018). Line of Control: Walk with the Indian and Pakistani Army. Penguin Random House India. ISBN 9789353053529.
  • (Printable version)
  • Jakob, Happymon (2018). The line of fire: ceasefire violations and escalation between India and Pakistan. Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780199095476.
  • (e-book version)
  • Zakaria, Anam (2018). Amid the Great Partition: Journey to Pakistan Administered Kashmir. India: HarperCollins. ISBN 9789352779475.
  • Hafiez, Mahwish (2014). “Trading Lines of Control (LoC): Glimmers of Hope”. strategy research. Institute for Strategic Studies Islamabad. 34(1):74-93. ISSN 1029-0990. JSTOR 48527555 – via JSTOR.
  • Arora, R.K.; Kumar, Manoj (November 2016), Fully Integrated Border Management Systems: Implementation Challenges (PDF), Periodic Paper 100, Observational Research Organization
  • Durrani, Maj. Gen. (retd) Mahmud Ali (July 2001), Enhancing Security through Collaborative Border Surveillance Experiments: A Proposal for India and Pakistan, Sandia is a multi-program lab set up by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin company, for the United States State Department of Energy, Cooperative Monitoring Center, Sandia National Laboratory, doi: 10.2172/783991, OSTI 783991

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  • Smart Border Management: Contributing to the $5 Trillion Economy (PDF), FICCI, Ernst

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Video tutorials about map of india and pakistan

keywords: #chiasẻ, #điệnthoạicómáyảnh, #điệnthoạiquayvideo, #miễnphí, #tảilên

India Condemns’s ‘Political Map’ of Pakistan

keywords: #ChangesinmapsofPakistan, #changesinmapsofIndia, #princelystatesofsubcontinents, #whoownsKashmir, #formationofPakistan, #princelystatesbeforepartition, #princelystatesofJunagadh, #princelystatesofHyderabad, #historyofsubcontinents, #India1947map, #PakistanIndiawars, #waronKashmir, #britshruleinsubcontinent, #howIndiagetindependence, #subcontinentmap, #Britishindiamap, #pakistanindiahistory, #partition1947, #mapbeforepartition1947, #newhorizon

This video shows changes in maps of Pakistan and India after partition in 1947. There were hundreds of independent princely states during British rule in subcontinents. Majority of them choose either Pakistan and India but several remain undecided till partition in 1947. Hyderabad, Junagadh, Kalat, Goa, Swat, Chitral, Sikkim etc. were the princely states that merged in Pakistan and India after partition.

Kashmir was also a princely states that is still remain undecided, causing conflict in South Asia.

The other undecided princely states merged in Pakistan and India in different times. This video is showing a timeline of the princely states merging and acceding to India and Pakistan

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NHN New Horizon

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#newhorizon #india #partition1947

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