Best 11 jefferson davis capture in a dress

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jefferson davis capture in a dress

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Photograph of Jefferson Davis in Women’s Clothing – Mental …

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  • Summary: Articles about Photograph of Jefferson Davis in Women’s Clothing – Mental … According to a handful of accounts from the period, Davis was captured while …

  • Match the search results: The story of Davis in women’s clothing traveled quickly to the ears of Edwin Stanton, the Secretary of War. Stanton recognized the story as an opportunity to discredit Davis, who still had numerous sympathizers throughout the country. Historians have noted that the North gendered its victory as masc…

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The Clothes in which Davis Disguised Himself – The Lost …

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  • Summary: Articles about The Clothes in which Davis Disguised Himself – The Lost … When Union soldiers captured Confederate President Jefferson Davis — purportedly wearing his wife’s dress and shawl — on May 10, 1865, Barnum was not the …

  • Match the search results: When Union soldiers captured Confederate President Jefferson Davis — purportedly wearing his wife’s dress and shawl — on May 10, 1865, Barnum was not the only northerner to make a spectacle of the bizarre event. Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton clothed a mannequin in a dress, hoopskirt, and shawl…

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Jefferson Davis Exhibit – The Lost Museum

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  • Summary: Articles about Jefferson Davis Exhibit – The Lost Museum News of former Confederate president Jefferson Davis’s capture by Union forces on May 10, 1865—and especially reports that, in an effort to evade arrest, …

  • Match the search results: This illustration of the capture of Confederate President Jefferson Davis served allegorical rather than documentary purposes. The figure of the Union soldier is not merely arresting Davis but, in a show of extreme dominance, apparently preparing to hurl him from a precipice. A knife and money escap…

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Pictures of Jefferson Davis Dressed Like a Woman – Politico

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  • Summary: Articles about Pictures of Jefferson Davis Dressed Like a Woman – Politico One hundred fifty years ago, Jefferson Davis, the former president of the Confederacy, was on the run, wanted for treason and suspected …

  • Match the search results: One hundred fifty years ago, Jefferson Davis, the former president of the Confederacy, was on the run, wanted for treason and suspected complicity in the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. In one final sprint to save himself, Davis slipped on his wife’s overcoat to flee advancing authorities, a choic…

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10 Things You May Not Know About Jefferson Davis – HISTORY

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  • Summary: Articles about 10 Things You May Not Know About Jefferson Davis – HISTORY 7. Contrary to reports, Davis was not dressed as a woman when captured. When Davis was seized on the drizzly predawn morning of May 10, 1865, …

  • Match the search results: 7. Contrary to reports, Davis was not dressed as a woman when captured.
    When Davis was seized on the drizzly predawn morning of May 10, 1865, he was wearing a loose-fitting, water-repellent overcoat, similar to a poncho, and his wife’s black shawl over his head and shoulders. Northern newspap…

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Jefferson Davis As An Unprotected Female! – HarpWeek …

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  • Summary: Articles about Jefferson Davis As An Unprotected Female! – HarpWeek … Jefferson Davis, the former president of the Confederacy, was captured by Union … The artist pictures him in a hoop skirt and bonnet, carrying a hatbox …

  • Match the search results: From Macon, Jefferson Davis was transported to Fort Monroe in
    Virginia.  The arresting officers had not reported anything
    unusual, but gossip soon spread among soldiers not on the scene that
    Davis had been wearing women’s clothing when he escaped.  By May

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Jeff Davis, in his traveling costume | Library of Congress

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  • Summary: Articles about Jeff Davis, in his traveling costume | Library of Congress … of photographic portrait of Jefferson Davis’ head atop a drawing of person in a dress, referring to a story that Davis was captured dressed as a woman.

  • Match the search results: (1865) Jeff Davis, in his traveling costume. United States, 1865. [N.Y.: Thorne, 60 Nassau St] [Photograph] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/2017659612/.

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[Jefferson Davis’s attempted escape in woman’s clothes with a …

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  • Summary: Articles about [Jefferson Davis’s attempted escape in woman’s clothes with a … [Jefferson Davis’s attempted escape in woman’s clothes with a knife in his hand.] Created / Published: Wheeler & Ely, New York, 1865; Subject Headings: – …

  • Match the search results: (1865) Jefferson Davis’s attempted escape in woman’s clothes with a knife in his hand. United States New York, 1865. Wheeler & Ely, New York. [Photograph] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/scsm000311/.

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Letter: Jeff Davis in Petticoats? | Encyclopedia Virginia, The Blog

  • Author: evblog.virginiahumanities.org

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  • Summary: Articles about Letter: Jeff Davis in Petticoats? | Encyclopedia Virginia, The Blog “Jefferson Davis as an Unprotected Female! … Sorry, the clothes Davis wore when he was captured were very much his wive’s clothes.

  • Match the search results: IMAGE: Jefferson Davis as an Unprotected Female! Originally published by Harper’s Weekly, May 27, 1865. Davis was captured in Irwinville, Georgia, on May 10.

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Capture of Jefferson Davis – New Georgia Encyclopedia

  • Author: www.georgiaencyclopedia.org

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  • Summary: Articles about Capture of Jefferson Davis – New Georgia Encyclopedia Confederate president Jefferson Davis still retained hopes for the future of the … of the fallen leader dressed in everything from a wig to a hoop skirt.

  • Match the search results: Among  Davis’s advisors were John H. Reagan, Judah P. Benjamin, John Breckinridge, and Burton Harrison. A small but elite military escort was also in tow, and they all arrived in Washington, in Wilkes County, on May 3. The next day Davis held a final meeting with his cabinet, and the memb…

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Capture of Jefferson Davis: in a woman’s dress… – Rare …

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  • Summary: Articles about Capture of Jefferson Davis: in a woman’s dress… – Rare … Timothy Hughes Rare & Early Newspapers offers the largest inventory of original historic newspapers for sale, all guaranteed authentic and all at great …

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Multi-read content jefferson davis capture in a dress

Nearly 200 years ago, General Benjamin Dudley Pritchard and the 4th Michigan Cavalry Army effectively ended the Civil War. It was May 10, 1865, when they arrested Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederacy, outside of Irwinville, Georgia. It was an event that many historians regard as the end of the Civil War conflict. Richmond fell, Robert E. Lee surrendered on April 9th. The interesting thing about Jefferson’s capture wasn’t that it officially ended the war. However, that was the story of his outfit.

Courtesy: Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Library

Davis and some of his cabinet members withdrew from Richmond after the defeat of General Lee on April 2, 1865. The cabinet took the gold from the Confederate coffers. They fear that the Old Confederation army will come after them to steal the gold because they know the war is over. They are also on the run from Confederate troops who want to capture Davis and claim a $100.00 bounty offered by the federal government.

On May 9, Davis decided to camp near Irwinville for the night. They dodged out of the way, and the pines helped hide their position. President Davis’ escorts did not circle their chariots. The idea was that if Union troops surrounded them while they camped in a tight encirclement, it would be difficult for Davis to escape. So Davis’ team organized the camp with an open plan, placing tents and carriages in an area about 100 meters wide. For reasons unknown, they had no guards that night, although they faced a real threat from attacks by ex-Confederate soldiers prospecting for gold or Confederate cavalry.

Davis told his aides that he would leave camp sometime during the night. He was dressed for the trip: a gray wool Confederate coat; grey pants; Black leather shoes with a high shaft and spikes. His horse was saddled and ready to ride. When Union soldiers marched in around 3 a.m. Jefferson Davis initially mistook them for the expected ex-Confederate soldiers. He opened the tent lid and quickly realized the Confederates were there to capture him.

Wedding photograph of Jefferson Davis and Varina Howell, 1845

When captured by Union soldiers, Davis was wearing his wife’s dark gray cloak and black scarf. First Lady Varina Davis gave him her cape because it is waterproof. She hoped it would hide his clothing, like a Confederate officer’s uniform. Below is an excerpt of a letter she wrote to her boyfriend explaining his odd way of dressing.

“Knowing he would be recognized I asked him to let me throw him a large waterproof cloth which he often uses as a dressing gown in the summer when he is ill and I hope Hope can cover him up at dawn. he is not recognized. As he left I threw a small black scarf over my head as I saw he couldn’t find his hat.”

The letter (pages 13-20) from Varina Davis to Montgomery Blair describing the June 6, 1865, arrest of her husband, Jefferson Davis.

News of Davis’ arrest – and with it the story of how he wore women’s clothing. Even the great actor P.T. Barnum tried to capitalize on the story. He wanted to exhibit the clothes in his New York museum and was willing to pay very well. Secretary of War Edwin Stanton refused his request and the garments were shipped to Washington D.C. brought. The arrival of the “skirts” proved to be a great disappointment. When Stanton saw the suit, he knew immediately that Davis was not wearing a skirt or cap when he was arrested. The public raved about seeing women’s clothing, but public viewing would expose the lie that Davis was wearing one of his wife’s dresses. So Stanton hid his clothes to perpetuate the myth that the cowardly “rebel leader” was trying to escape in his wife’s clothes.

The image of the President of the Union dressed as a woman made northerners happy but angered southerners. Eliza Andrews, a young woman who saw Davis walking through her town during his escape, condemned the photos in her journal:

“I hate the Yankees more and more every time I look at one of their horrible newspapers. . . The Harper’s Weekly and Frank Leslie pictures lie more than Satan himself was their father. I am very angry. . . with which I sometimes take off my sandals and smash lifeless papers with them. Words cannot describe a Southerner’s outrage at seeing pictures of President Davis dressed in women’s clothing.”

Photograph of Jefferson Davis in Irwinsville, GA: Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, June 3, 1865

Davis and his family were shipped to Fort Monroe, Virginia, with Confederate Vice President Alexander Stephens. On May 22, Davis was brought ashore and taken to prison. He was tried for treason but never tried and released two years later in May 1867. He has survived the 24 years since Lincoln survived, writing memoirs and becoming the South’s favorite living symbol during the Civil War. Although Jefferson Davis spent the rest of his life preserving the memory of the Confederacy, he was never able to dispel the myth that he was arrested disguised as a Southerner. In 1939, the Jefferson Davis Memorial Historic Site was opened to mark the spot where Confederate President Jefferson Davis was captured.

Memorial in Jefferson Davis Memorial Park.

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It was here along this road that Jefferson Davis, the President of the Confederacy, having crossed the Catawba at Nation Ford on April 27, 1865, fled south following the fall of Richmond. He was accompanied by the remaining members of his cabinet and a detachment of cavalry under Gen. John C. Breckinridge.

Previously on April 2, the Union Army had taken Petersburg, then Richmond forcing Davis to flee. His flight would take a more serious turn when Lincoln was shot and died the next day on April 15.

Andrew Johnson became Lincoln’s successor, he was known to have no mercy for the south. Johnson issued a $100,000 reward for the capture of Davis, saying he had a part in Lincoln’s assassination. Needless to say, the search for Davis intensified. The cavalry got Davis and his remaining cabinet members to the city of Washington, Georgia where the Confederate Cabinet met for the last time at Heard House with 14 members attending. Their despairing duty—dissolving the Confederate government.

After leaving the city, Davis was on the run again, along with his wife Varina and a hand-picked escort led by Given Campbell.

On May 10, Davis and his escort were captured by Union forces at the town of Irwinville, Georgia.

President Davis’s wife described his capture as terrifying. Very early in the morning, the Union troops came into Davis’s camp yelling and threatening. As Davis tried to escape, his wife tried to get him an overcoat that would keep him warm and dry, but time was of the essence. Davis couldn’t even find his hat. It would be 40 years later that the rumor that Davis had left in woman’s clothing would be dispelled. The Washington Post reported that research had found that the heavy black shawl that Davis was wearing over his head when he was captured was actually given to him to protect him from the cold by James Henry Jones, a slave and Davis’s valet.

Along this route, no doubt, the South had seen its darkest days as did their president, Jefferson Davis, as they bid farewell to their Confederacy and with that, their lifestyles and their beliefs.

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A song from the American Civil War. When Richmond fell to the Union in the spring of 1865, Confederate President Jefferson Davis was forced to flee the city, along with his wife and his Cabinet. According to the Federal cavalrymen who finally apprehended him in the pre-dawn hours of May 10 at Irwinsville, Georgia, he was dressed in his wife’s clothing in an attempt to evade capture. Davis claimed that he had picked up his wife’s raglan by mistake in the dark and that his wife had hurriedly thrown her shawl over his shoulders to protect him from the morning chill. After his arrest, the rumour quickly spread that he had been disguised wearing women’s clothing. Though Davis’s version was probably correct, the alternative was more appealing to the Northern public. Henry Tucker wrote the lyrics to “Jeff in Petticoats” and George Cooper composed the music. It was a great success with Northern audiences after the war.

There are several references to women’s clothing in the song, including the crinoline (petticoat), pantaloons, stays (corset), skirt and shift.

This song was requested by Andrew Densmore.

Lyrics and chords:

G ……………………. C …. G ……………. D7

Jeff Davis was a hero bold, You’ve heard of him, I know

…… G …………………….. C …. G ……………. D7 …………………… G

He tried to make himself a king where southern breezes blow.

………………. D7 …….. G …….. D7 …….. C …………………… G

But “Uncle Sam” he laid the youth across his mighty knee

……………………………………….. C ………. G …….. D7 …………….. G

And spanked him well and that’s the end of brave old Jeffy D.

C ……………………. G

Oh! Jeffy D, you “flow’r of chivalree,”

…… D7

Oh, royal Jeffy D.!

…….. G ……………….. C ……….. G ……….. D7 ……………. G

Your empire’s but a tin-clad skirt, oh charming Jeffy D.

This Davis he was always full of bluster and of brag,

He swore, on all our Northern walls he’d plant his Rebel rag.

But when to battle he did go he said, “I’m not so green,

To dodge the bullets I will wear my tin-clad crinoline.”

Now when he saw the game was up he started for the woods,

His bandbox hung upon his arm quite full of fancy goods.

Said Jeff, “They’ll never take me now, I’m sure I’ll not be seen

They’d never think to look for me beneath my crinoline.”

Jeff took with him, the people say, a mine of golden coin

Which he, from banks and other places managed to purloin.

But while he ran, like every thief, he had to drop the spoons,

And maybe that’s the reason why he dropped his pantaloons.

Our union boys were on his track for many nights and days,

His palpitating heart it beat enough to burst his stays.

Oh! What a dash he must have cut with form so tall and lean

Just fancy now the “What is it?” dressed up in crinoline!”

The ditch that Jeff was hunting for he found was very near,

He tried to “shift” his base again, his neck felt rather queer.

Just on the out-“skirts” of a wood his dainty shape was seen,

His boots stuck out, and now they’ll hang old Jeff in crinoline.

Lyrics and chords of many of my songs are no longer available, as my website has expired. I am currently posting lyrics to the information panels on all my videos and those that are too long to post in full will be found on my new website:

-https://raymondsfolkpage.wordpress.com

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Traces the history of the Yoruba people of West Africa and their journey into slavery in Colonial America. Shows the dress, jewelry, baskets, pottery, and musical instruments of the Yoruba culture in West Africa in the 15th and 16th centuries. The traveling Yoruba storyteller or Keeper of Records at this Yoruba wedding ceremony warned the people of a coming danger, slavery.

Blacks in leg irons and chains shuffle along. Shows captured Blacks chained in hold of slave ship. Slaves at work in field. Blacksmith at work. Shows slaves attending a secret meeting to listen to the griot or storyteller. Shows a slave wedding ceremony performed by the griot or storyteller. People from the North secretly distributing papers and documents such as David Walker’s Appeal, a radical anti-slavery document.

Shows two slaves fleeing to the North, sounds of barking dog. Firing of cannons depict start of the Civil War and the end of slavery in America.

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