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st marks national wildlife refuge

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St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge | Visit Us

  • Author: www.fws.gov

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  • Summary: Articles about St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge | Visit Us Located off US 98, west of the town of St. Marks, the Wakulla Unit of the …

  • Match the search results: One of the most photographed landmarks on the Gulf coast, the St. Marks Lighthouse is the second oldest lighthouse in Florida and the oldest on the Gulf coast. It was the only lighthouse in Florida with wooden stairs. The current tower was completed in 1842.

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Friends of St. Marks Wildlife Refuge

  • Author: www.stmarksrefuge.org

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  • Summary: Articles about Friends of St. Marks Wildlife Refuge The Friends organization of St. Marks Wildlife Refuge is a non-profit volunteer group which supports the conservation, education, and preservation work of the …

  • Match the search results: The Friends organization of St. Marks Wildlife Refuge is a non-profit volunteer group which supports the conservation, education, and preservation work of the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. We work closely with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service team to support the precious wildlife of the St….

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St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge (Tallahassee) – TripAdvisor

  • Author: www.tripadvisor.com

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (10975 Ratings)

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  • Summary: Articles about St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge (Tallahassee) – TripAdvisor This Refuge is on the Gulf coast. The waters are calm, and the wildlife is all around you. For $5 per car, you can spend the entire day there walking the trails …

  • Match the search results: This is the version of our website addressed to speakers of English in the United States. If you are a resident of another country or region, please select the appropriate version of Tripadvisor for your country or region in the drop-down menu. more

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St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge | Florida Hikes

  • Author: floridahikes.com

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (31518 Ratings)

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  • Summary: Articles about St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge | Florida Hikes Stretching across 70,000 acres in Florida’s Big Bend, St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge protects one of Florida’s longest wild shorelines, more than 43 miles …

  • Match the search results: Entry fees only apply in the St. Marks Unit (east of the St. Marks River), where the Visitor Center is located.

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St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge: Naturally Beautiful – Visit …

  • Author: www.visitflorida.com

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (16463 Ratings)

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  • Summary: Articles about St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge: Naturally Beautiful – Visit … Marks National Wildlife Refuge and Lighthouse, about 25 miles south of Tallahassee. There are salt marshes, tidal flats, and freshwater pools …

  • Match the search results: Did you know National Wildlife Refuges preserve more acreage than America’s national parks? (About 150 million acres vs. 84 million acres.)

    I had no idea, either, untilI learned that fact on trip to the wonderful J.N. ‘Ding’ Darling National Wildlife Refuge in Sanibel.

    And…

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St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge – Visit Natural North Florida

  • Author: www.naturalnorthflorida.com

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  • Summary: Articles about St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge – Visit Natural North Florida St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge – St. Mark’s National Wildlife Refuge extends through Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor counties, stretching more than 43 …

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St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge & Lighthouse – Visit …

  • Author: visittallahassee.com

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  • Summary: Articles about St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge & Lighthouse – Visit … Established in 1931 as a wintering home for migratory birds, the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge serves as the gateway to the Panhandle Section of the …

  • Match the search results: Established in 1931 as a wintering home for migratory birds, the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge serves as the gateway to the Panhandle Section of the Great Florida Birding Trail, it is a popular spot for viewing more than 250 different species throughout the year. Waterfowl are commonly seen fro…

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Saint Marks National Wildlife Refuge, a Florida … – State Parks

  • Author: www.stateparks.com

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  • Summary: Articles about Saint Marks National Wildlife Refuge, a Florida … – State Parks Find information about Saint Marks National Wildlife Refuge, a Florida National Wildlife Refuge located near Crawfordville, Tallahassee.

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St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge | Audubon Important Bird …

  • Author: www.audubon.org

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (11456 Ratings)

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  • Summary: Articles about St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge | Audubon Important Bird … St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1931 to provide wintering habitat for migratory waterfowl. It consists of four units: Aucilla River, …

  • Match the search results: St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge was established in 1931 to provide wintering habitat for migratory waterfowl. It consists of four units: Aucilla River, Panacea, St. Marks, and Wakulla. The Refuge receives 250,000 recreationists and 1000 hunters annually.

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National Wildlife Refuge-St. Marks & Otter Lake – Things to Do

  • Author: carrabelle.org

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  • Summary: Articles about National Wildlife Refuge-St. Marks & Otter Lake – Things to Do St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge is one of the oldest wildlife refuges in the United States. Established in 1931 as a wintering ground for migratory birds …

  • Match the search results: St. Marks NWR provides numerous recreation opportunities to thousands of visitors every year. People enjoy viewing the unique geology and diverse wildlife.  Certain trails are limited to foot traffic only while all the levees and woodland roads are open to hiking, bicycling and horseback riding…

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St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge: A gem for wildlife, views

  • Author: www.floridarambler.com

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (13550 Ratings)

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  • Summary: Articles about St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge: A gem for wildlife, views Kayakers can start here, paddle up to the boundary of Wakulla Springs State Park (no private boats are allowed inside the park) and then return.

  • Match the search results: The entrance to St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge is about 15 miles off US 98 and about a half hour from the town of St. Marks, Florida. The address is 1255 Lighthouse Road, St. Marks. Admission to the refuge is $5, but free for holders of national park passes.

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Multi-read content st marks national wildlife refuge

Along the St Mark’s coast is a rich estuary environment dotted with small beaches, tidal streams and islands fed by large rivers and surrounded by coastal pine forests and palm hammocks.

But the refuge also extends inland. Vast pine forests surround low-lying swamps and cypress-lined ponds where the refuge boundary touches public lands such as the Apalachicola National Forest and Ochlockonee River State Park.

resources

Florida Trail Hikes book cover

The Florida Trail Guide book cover

North Florida Panhandle Explorers Guide book cover

Hikers Guide to the Sunshine State book cover

Disclosure: As authors and affiliates, we receive revenue when you purchase them through our links. This helps us to make public information available on this website.

overview

Location: St. Marks
Little Street: 30.163435, -84.155153
Address: 1255 Lighthouse Street, St. Marks FL 32355
Fees: $5 vehicle, $1 bike or pedestrian
Restrooms: in the Visitor Center and Tower Pond
Land Management: USA Fish
Phone: 850-925-6121

Open morning to evening. The gate on Lighthouse Street opens at 6am and closes after dark. Keep an eye out for alligators along the shelter trails as they are a common sight.

Admission is only valid on St. Marks (east of the St. Marks River) where the Visitor Center is located.

The National Park Card and the federal duck symbol are honored for entry. You can purchase an annual Shelter-in-Place pass for $25.

Direction

refugee unit

The hideout consists of three separate units. Each unit has separate access points and paths, all outside of US 98.

The directions above apply to Marks St. It is the main and most visited unit thanks to its historic lighthouse and access to a variety of walking and multipurpose trails. This is also the only unit that requires an entrance fee.

Impoundment at St Marks NWROne of the many detention places in St. Marked NWR

The Panacea Unit along US 98 surrounds Otter Lake and extends northwest to Ochlockonee and Sopchoppy Bays. It borders both sides of Surf Road and touches the Ochlockonee River State Park boundary.

The Aucilla Unit borders the Aucilla River on the county line between Wakulla and Jefferson counties along US 98. It includes the river entrance and a very wild section of the Florida Trail on the eastern edge of the refuge. Boat ramp fees apply on the Aucilla River.

St Marks NWR Aucilla UnitThe entrance to the Aucilla Unit off US 98 just east of the JR Store in Aucilla

story

ancient people

Ancient sites are a big reason why St. Marks protect this coastline. Human history is deeply entrenched along Big Bend, with some of America’s earliest artwork discovered along the Aucilla River.

Shell mounds in the estuary have yielded artifacts from ancient times and the Weeden Island period. The Tower Pond Trail traverses archaeological deposits from four different time periods.

Tower Pond Trail pine forestAlong the Tower Pond Trail

civil war

Built in 1831, St. Marks played an important role in the Civil War. This is a national registry, occasionally open for tours.

St Marks lighthouse

St Marks Lighthouse

Built in 1842, St Marks played an important role in the Civil War. Although its light was extinguished during the war, it remains an active lighthouse marking the location of St.

During the Civil War, local families boiled seawater to make salt for Confederate troops. Remains of this salt production still lie on the hills at the river mouths.

wood and railroad

In 1837, one of Florida’s earliest railroads, the Tallahassee to St. Marks, connected to the city of Port Leon along the Wakulla River.

Port Leon, a busy port, became the county seat of Wakulla County in 1843. Six months later, both the city and the coastal section of the railroad were obliterated by a hurricane and flood.

St Marks NWR Port Leon wharfRemains of the jetty in Port Leon from when the visitor center was in the ghost town

Live Oak, Perry was established in the early 1900’s to harvest cypress and pine logs in this area

When the abundance of the forests was exhausted, the community evaporated and the railroad was closed. The Florida Trail connects part of the railroad.

Pinhook River Bridge on the Florida TrailThe footbridge was built on top of the old railroad bridge over the Pinhook River

Pine not removed was harvested for naval supplies, including turpentine. To build the refuge in the 1930s, the federal government purchased a tract of pine forest along the Wakulla River from the Phillips Turpentine Company.

Civil Conservation Corps

The levees you walk on at St Marks are still there today due to the pioneering work of the Civilian Conservation Corps in the 1930’s.
The men of Camp BF-1 built the infrastructure for what was then known as St. Marks. BF-1 is one of the few isolated African American camps in the Civilian Conservation Corps.

Opened in 1933 in Newport, the camp was briefly closed in 1934 due to an outbreak of malaria. Both yellow fever and malaria were prevalent in Florida swamps until aggressive wetland management was introduced to control mosquitoes.

St Marks NWR impoundmentBarriers built by CCC are shelters for today’s wildlife

The camp reopened away from the Woodville swamps and continued to provide its workers with a steady income while they built the pegs, firebreaks, dikes and dams you see in the shelters today.

Camp BF-1 was closed in 1942 when World War II began. Most of the land-based infrastructure that CCC workers built with limited pickaxes, shovels, and heavy equipment remains.

Lighthouse Levee St MarksLighthouse Levee is now a nature trail

Wildlife at St. Marks

Bird lovers note that St Marks is an attractive destination as fine pictures of shorebirds can be easily taken from the refuge’s levee paths. You will also see a large number of crocodiles.

St Marks NWR alligator along canalCrocodiles are often seen along the canals in the forest

In October, the shelter celebrates the annual migration of monarch butterflies. Thousands of butterflies blanketed the flowering bushes as they stopped for a meal before crossing the Gulf of Mexico to their final destination in Mexico.

St Marks monarch migrationMigrating monarch butterflies settle in the salt marshes near the lighthouse

Hiking at St. Marks

nature trail

Short nature trails allow you to explore the habitats along Big Bend’s shoreline. All of these trails are accessible from Lighthouse Road. The visitor center has an easily accessible boardwalk and overlooks Plum Orchard Pond.

Plum Orchard Pond

Plum Orchard Pond Trail

Starting next to the Visitor Center in St Marks, the Plum Orchard Pond Trail is an easy half a mile detour that takes you along Plum Orchard Pond, a great stop.

Tower Pond Trail St Marks NWR

Tower Pond Walk

At St. Marks, the Tower Pond Trail runs for a mile through open expanses of land and wetland along the Gulf of Mexico, offering breathtaking views and great hiking trails.

Lighthouse Levee Trail

Lighthouse Dike Walk

A windswept hike along the Gulf of Mexico, the Lighthouse Levee Trail offers breathtaking panoramas of both the Bay Area and the swamps near St. Marks.

Cedar Point

Cedar Point Trail

Shaded by coastal cedars between open swamp and boat canals, the Cedar Point Trail leads from the saltwater boat ramp to the Gulf of Mexico and is just a short walk from the Gulf Coast.

original track

The Primitive Trails are a series of marked detours off the Lighthouse Road that take hikers along wooded paths and levees. The Deep Creek Trail makes a 12-mile detour while the Stoney Bayou Trail has a 4-mile detour.

Both are great choices for wildlife viewing and some of the best panoramic views you’ll find on a stroll along Big Bend’s waterfront. Both paths can also be used. Portions of the Deep Creek Trail and Stoney Bayou Trail share a coastal route with the Florida Trail.

St. Marks NWRAlong one of the levees shared with the Stoney Bayou Trail and the Florida Trail

The Florida Trail at St. Marks

The Florida Trail traverses the entire St. Marks in an east-west direction and offers the only backpacking experience in the US at a National Wildlife Refuge. The views from this coastal stretch of the Florida Trail are simply outstanding.

With many easily accessible hiking trails off US 98, the Florida Trail day hike in the Hideout is easy to do. These are the sections of the Florida Trail that we describe in detail.

Pinhook River Bridge on the Florida Trail

Florida Trail, Apalachee Bay

14.3 miles. On the shores of Big Bend, the Aucilla WMA and St. These NWR markers offer some of the most breathtaking views you’ll find along the Florida Trail and wildlife aplenty.

Shepherd Spring

Florida Trail, Shepherd Spring

5.3 miles. Dive into the coastal swamp at Palms Church, this popular Florida Trail hike focuses on Shepherd Spring, a natural treasure on St. Marks.

Marsh Point

Hiking to Marsh Point

Located at St. Marks NWR, Marsh Point captures the essence of Florida’s Gulf Coast. But hikers miss it because the bridges are gone.

Cycling at St. Marks

An extensive network of forest trails and sweeping levees are available to cyclists on both units of St. Marks and Otter Lake.

The surface ranges from hard limestone to grass. In places, water flows through some forest paths. Fat tires are recommended.

Florida Trail Shepherd SpringWoodway between Wakulla Beach Road and Spring Creek Highway

Although it doesn’t touch the stash, Tallahassee-St is 16 miles long. The Marks Trail ends in sight on the far bank of St. Marks.

Tallahassee St Marks Trail benchAlong the Tallahassee Trail-St Marks a few miles north of the hideout

This north-south paved trail joins the Coastal Trail, a new east-west route parallel to US 98 from St. Marks to Medart, providing entry points for hidden jungle road trips.

Coastal Trail WakullaThe Florida Trail leads to a refuge off the Coastal Trail west of the Wakulla River

The 13-mile Ochlockonee Bay Cycling Trail runs through the hideout between Sopchoppy Park and Mahes Sands, a paved ribbon that also offers thrill-seekers access to forests.

Ochlockonee Bay Bike Trail terminusTerminus of the Ochlockonee Bay Cycle Path at Mahes Sands Park

Boating at St. Marks

Boaters on the Florida Circumnavigational Saltwater Boating Trail follow the coast along the 50-mile shelter between Ochlockonee Bay and the Aucilla River.

Florida Circumnavigational Trail St MarksPaddle along Apalachee Bay at Ring Dike

At the east end, kayakers can access the trail from the lower Aucilla River. On the west side, the map suggests starting at Bald Point State Park to paddle across the mouth of Ochlockonee Bay and to the east shore.

Dickerson Bay PanaceaThe estuary labyrinth in Dickerson Bay off Panacea

Boaters can also use the trailhead from Mahes Sands Park, Dickerson Bay, Spring Creek, Wakulla Beach and St. Marks.

Beach at St Marks LighthouseThe beach at St Marks Lighthouse is a popular stop for boaters

There are several campgrounds within the refuge and several commercial campgrounds along the boat route. If you use refugee campsites, they must be booked in advance.

Expect windbreaks in larger bays. On the map, this section of the statewide canoe route is part of segment 5, the Crooked/St. markings.

Hiking map (PDF) Camping permit (PDF)

Camping at St. Marks

campsite nearby

The refuge itself does not have a campsite. However, there is a popular County Park campground just across from the main gate along US 98th Street in Newport. Newport Park tends to get crowded in winter. Tents, RVs and small RVs are all welcome.

There is a basic bath house, a boat ramp leading to the River St Marks, a promenade overlooking the river and a great local seafood restaurant, Outz Too, all within walking distance. To reserve your spot, call 850-745-7780.

Newport Park tent campingCamping in Newport Park

When Newport Park is full, the closest place to camp isShell Island Fish Farm, 440 Shell Island Rd, in Marks St. Call 850-925-6226 to make a reservation.

We have stayed here many times. In addition to tent and RV sites, there are small cabins, spacious cabins and a lodge for anglers. If you hike the Florida Trail, they can give you markers that you have to do by boat as you cross the St.

Shell Island Fish Camp motelShell Island Fish Farm Hostel

Camping in the back country

As far as we know, St. Marks is the only National Wildlife Refuge with remote campgrounds. To use them, you first need a special license and you have to follow very specific rules for using them.

Marsh Point campsiteMarsh Point Campground on the Florida Trail

Campgrounds are located along the Florida National Scenic Trail, which cuts through the entire hideout in an east-west direction. Some of these are shared with paddlers using the Florida Circumnavigational Saltwater Paddling Trail.

Ring Levee campsiteRing Dike Campground sits right on the edge of the estuary

Each campsite has benches and fire rings. You must bring drinking water as most surface springs in shelters are salt or brackish.

Expect intense mosquitoes and/or gnaws at the campgrounds at Pinhook River, Ring Dike, and Marsh Point, as these campgrounds are right on the estuary.

Camping regulations (PDF) Camping permits (PDF)

Looking for more information!

slideshow

Check out our photos of St. Marks

Click to show

adventures nearby

Worth exploring more if you’re in the area.

Wakulla River as seen from in front of Wakulla Lodge

Wakulla Springs State Park

A 1930’s resort turned nature park surrounding one of the largest and deepest springs in the world, Wakulla Springs State Park takes you back in time at Florida’s only state park lodge

Aucilla Rapids

Florida Trail, Aucilla River

9 miles. The scenery is breathtakingly beautiful, surprisingly rugged in many places, and unlike any other section of the Florida Trail in the state, this trip along the Aucilla River showcases some of Florida’s most important natural features in just one stroll.

Aucilla Sinks

Florida Trail, Aucilla Sinks

4.4 miles. The most intriguing stretch of the Florida Trail, which winds through an eerie and archaeologically significant part of Florida’s geology, is the Aucilla Sinks

Hiking map (PDF) Interactive map Official website

Video tutorials about st marks national wildlife refuge

keywords: #St.MarksNationalWildlifeRefuge(ProtectedSite), #TouristDestination, #Tourism(Interest), #St.Marks(City/Town/Village), #Tallahassee(City/Town/Village), #Nature(Journal), #Outdoors, #NationalWildlifeRefuge(ParkSystem), #Fishing(TVGenre), #Kayaking(Sport), #Cycling(Interest), #Photography(VisualArtForm), #WhoopingCrane(OrganismClassification), #WakullaCounty(USCounty), #JeffersonCounty(USCounty), #TaylorCounty(USCounty)

St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge is one of the oldest wildlife refuges in the United States. Established in 1931 as a wintering ground for migratory birds, it encompasses 68,000 acres spread between Wakulla, Jefferson, and Taylor Counties in the state of Florida.

keywords: #St.MarksNationalWildlifeRefuge, #Nature, #Floridia, #FloridaWildlife, #BabyHypergonar, #St.Marks, #CinemaScope, #anamorphic, #1.75x, #wakulla

A Journey through the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge

Cinematography / Editing / Composer

Ian Edward Weir

Produced By

Farnaz Khosbakht

Filmed from 2015-2017

Music Credits:

Ian Edward Weir

African Tongue Drum, Drumset, Percussion and Synthesizer

Bradley White

American Indian Flute, Shakuhachi Flute and Didgeridoo

Thomas Stratton

Flute

Anita Nix

Percussion

Ramin Yazdanpanah

Digeridoo

Sound Design and Mix

Ian Edward Weir

Special Thanks:

St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Farnaz Khoshbakht

Florida State University College of Motion Pictures Arts

John Barrow at Rectilux

Technical:

Filmed on a Panasonic GH4 4k anamorphic mode.

Lens:

Baby Hypergonar 1.75x anamorphic lens in a Rectilux Hard Core DNA variable diopter.

Bolex 16/32 1.5x anamorphot. Kowa C35 1.5x and a Kowa 1.75x Inflight anamorphic lens.

Taking lens used were the Voigtländer 42.5mm f0.95, Voigtlander Color-Skoparex 28mm 2.8 , Olympus Zuiko Pen F 38mm f1.8, MeVis 35mm f1.6, Takumar 200mm f3.5, SMC Takumar 135mm f2.5 and the Zeiss Ultron 50mm f1.8.

Edited in Adobe Premiere and colored with Colorista III and Film Convert.

My collection of nature films.

-https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLIEXyH1Xyq4SOBvliUIAb185MLBbZrv9W

Ian Edward Weir

-http://www.ianeweir.com/

keywords:

keywords: #hike, #camp, #outdoors, #backpacking, #StMarks, #National, #wildliferefuge, #wildlife, #birding, #alligators, #florida, #forgottencoast, #gulfofmexico, #thingstodo, #lighthouse

The grand finale of our Forgotten Coast expedition, we explore St. Marks and all the amazing wildlife here on the big bend of the Florida panhandle! Highlights include Headquarters Pond, Tower Pond, Stoney Bayou, and St. Marks Lighthouse, Florida’s second oldest (and still operating!) lighthouse.

#florida #forgottencoast #stmarksnationalwildliferefuge #wildlife #floridawildlife #livetheadventure #alligator #heron #egret #ibis #baldeagle #kingfisher #wetlands #gulfofmexico #migration #birdmigration #sloneswildernessexpeditions #lighthouse

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