Best 12 how many people died building the empire state building

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how many people died building the empire state building

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Empire State Building – Wikipedia

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  • Summary: Articles about Empire State Building – Wikipedia According to official accounts, five workers died during the construction, although the New York Daily News gave reports of 14 deaths and a headline in the …

  • Match the search results: While plans for the Empire State Building were being finalized, an intense competition in New York for the title of “world’s tallest building” was underway. 40 Wall Street (then the Bank of Manhattan Building) and the Chrysler Building in Manhattan both vied for this distinction and were already und…

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The human cost of construction: An inside look at the world’s …

  • Author: www.iccsafe.org

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  • Summary: Articles about The human cost of construction: An inside look at the world’s … The Empire State Building and Chicago’s Sears Tower both reported just five deaths during their respective construction periods.

  • Match the search results: Completed in 1930 after two quick years of construction, the Chrysler building in New York was the world’s tallest building for only 11 months before being surpassed by the Empire State Building. 3,000 workers, building at an average rate of four floors per week, manually laid almost 4 million brick…

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Historic snaps show the terrifying conditions for Empire State …

  • Author: www.thesun.co.uk

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  • Summary: Articles about Historic snaps show the terrifying conditions for Empire State … Official accounts state that five workers lost their lives during the construction of the building. This isn’t surprising when you notice the lack of harnesses …

  • Match the search results: “In fact, the analogy is startling, even to the occasional grim reality of a building accident where maimed bodies, and even death, remind us that we are fighting a war of construction against the forces of nature.”

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How Many People Died Building the Empire State Building?

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  • Summary: Articles about How Many People Died Building the Empire State Building? There were five fatalities. Five people were killed in the collapse of the Empire State Building. Although it is said that hundreds perished during …

  • Match the search results: Today, however, the Empire State Building is stuffed full of firms, both huge and small, employing thousands of people. In reality, the building employs almost 20,000 people. It's just that most of them are not staff members but rather contractors who work for builders or managers hired by the b…

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Looking Back on the World’s Deadliest Construction Projects

  • Author: www.forconstructionpros.com

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  • Summary: Articles about Looking Back on the World’s Deadliest Construction Projects Like the Chrysler Building, which had 3,000 workers and zero deaths, the Eiffel Tower kept its construction worker death toll down to one worker …

  • Match the search results: Like the Chrysler Building, which had 3,000 workers and zero deaths, the Eiffel Tower kept its construction worker death toll down to one worker with much credit going to extensive use of guard rails and safety screens. The other U.S. skyscraper projects included the Empire State Building, which had…

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The Wild and Dark History of the Empire State Building | 6sqft

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  • Summary: Articles about The Wild and Dark History of the Empire State Building | 6sqft The pilot tried to climb and twist away but it was too late. Upon impact, the bomber made a hole in the building measuring eighteen feet high …

  • Match the search results: Prior to the Empire State Building, the U.S. lineup of tall towers included the Metropolitan Life Tower at 700 feet, constructed in 1909, followed by the 729-foot Woolworth Building in 1913, and finally the 927-foot Bank of Manhattan Building in 1929.

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Five died building the real Empire State Building. I cut my finger

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  • Summary: Articles about Five died building the real Empire State Building. I cut my finger The real Empire State Building was built in just 410 days by 3,400 men, at an astonishing rate of four and a half floors a week.

  • Match the search results: Has the project done me any good? Possibly. I have become acutely aware of the shape of this iconic building, of its mass, its contours, its proportions, its most subtle architectural features. Before I embarked on the model, I couldn’t have drawn you a convincing picture of the Empire State Buildin…

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10 Surprising Facts About the Empire State Building – HISTORY

  • Author: www.history.com

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  • Summary: Articles about 10 Surprising Facts About the Empire State Building – HISTORY The Empire State Building was eventually finished ahead of schedule and under budget, but it also came with a human cost: at least five workers …

  • Match the search results: When he drew up its plans in 1929, architect William Lamb of the firm Shreve, Lamb and Harmon is said to have modeled the Empire State Building after Winston-Salem, North Carolina’s Reynolds Building—which he had previously designed—and Carew Tower in Cincinnati. The two earlier…

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How Many People Died Building the Empire State Building?

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  • Summary: Articles about How Many People Died Building the Empire State Building? According to official records, five people died while constructing the Empire State Building. One was struck by a truck, another fell down an elevator shaft …

  • Match the search results: The Empire State Building measures 1,454 feet from its base to the tip of the lightning rod. It has 102 floors and, at the time of construction in 1931, was the tallest building in the world. It held that title for over 40 years, until the north tower of the World Trade Center was built in 1972.

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Empire State Building | Height, Construction, History, & Facts

  • Author: www.britannica.com

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  • Summary: Articles about Empire State Building | Height, Construction, History, & Facts Empire State Building, steel-framed skyscraper rising 102 stories that was completed in New York City in 1931 and was the tallest building in the world …

  • Match the search results: The Empire State Building’s notable appearances in some of the 20th century’s most romantic films may have served as the inspiration for the contest. First in Love Affair (1939) and then its remake An Affair to Remember (1957), the films’ star-crossed lovers memorably make plans to meet again at the…

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how many men died building the empire state building

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  • Summary: Articles about how many men died building the empire state building 14 How many died building the Golden Gate Bridge? 15 How many people died building the Sydney Harbour bridge? 16 Who really built the Brooklyn Bridge?

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5 Unexpected Facts about the Empire State Building – Renoir …

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  • Summary: Articles about 5 Unexpected Facts about the Empire State Building – Renoir … The Empire State Building Was a Financial Flop When It Was First Built … of the building being filled, so they would have their workers go through the …

  • Match the search results: The competition was fierce and in the running were the Chrysler Building and the Bank of Manhattan Building, but ultimately New York Governor Al Smith and John J Raskob announced their plans for the Empire State Building, which at the time became the tallest building in the world and held the title …

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Multi-read content how many people died building the empire state building

Building can be a risky business. Over the past 200 years, hundreds of thousands of people have died working on construction projects, whether from accidents, equipment failure, or unsafe working conditions. Fatalities on major construction sites have declined in recent years as safety procedures, labor rights and equipment have improved.

New interactive timeline from Southern California law firm DIMARCO | ARAUJO | MONTEVIDEO includes some of the most important architectural and infrastructure projects in the world, including the Panama Canal (30,609 fatalities), Hoover Dam (96 fatalities), World Trade Center (60 fatalities), and Hoover Dam (96 fatalities). ) and Brookyln Bridge (30 dead). The timeline puts some of the most dangerous projects into context and shows how major construction projects of the past 200 years compare in terms of the number of people lost. The timeline also breaks down each project’s mortality rate per thousand workers.

The timeline also includes some surprisingly non-fatal construction projects, from the Chrysler Building in New York, where none died among the 3,000 workers who completed it in 1930, to the Eiffel Tower, with only one reported death during construction in 1889. The Empire State Building and the Sears Tower in Chicago both reported just 5 deaths during their respective construction periods.

One of the deadliest projects is the Suez Canal. Its construction caused the deaths of 120,000 wage and forced laborers who excavated it over a decade in the mid-19th century, which, with around 1.5 million people involved in construction, equates to a rate of 80 deaths for every 1,000 workers – a rate that is consistent with comparable to the construction of the Transcontinental Railroad in the United States, which employed 1,200 of its 15,000 workers. The most devastating project was the Panama Canal, which killed more than 30,000 people, accounting for about 40% of the workforce.

1825

Erie Canal: 1,000 dead

Dubbed the 8th Wonder of the World upon its completion in 1825, the Erie Canal connected Lake Erie to the Hudson River and was instrumental in opening up the land west of the Appalachian Mountains to human settlement and trade. It took a total of eight years and about 50,000 workers, working for 80 cents a day, to complete the legendary 363-mile road. Out of the 50,000 workers, 1,000 were killed by disease outbreaks from the swampy terrain and the careless use of gunpowder in the blasting. Others drowned or were buried under tons of rubble due to frequent sewer collapses.

1869

Transcontinental Railroad: 1,200 dead

15,000 worked on this project, which began in 1863. White men were paid $35.00 a month plus housing. The Chinese receive $25.00 a month but are paid for their own sustenance. However, the figure of 1,200 has never been verified. A June 30, 1870 article titled “Bones in Transit” in the Sacramento Reporter reported that “about 20,000 pounds of bones” unearthed from shallow graves were brought back to China by train, a figure that totals up to to 1,200 Chinese. Another article published in the Sacramento Union the same day said the bones of only about 50 Chinese were on board. Others believe that some Chinese must also have died in an outbreak of smallpox among railroad workers, although there is no record of any of those killed being Chinese. In addition, there are reports of Chinese workers killed in Nevada as a result of Indian raids.

1869

Suez Canal: 120,000 dead

The Suez Canal, completed in 1869, connecting the Mediterranean Sea to the Red Sea, allowed shipping between Europe and Asia without having to cross Africa. The 101-mile road employed 1.5 million forced and wage laborers from various countries, mostly Egypt, and 120,000 people died during the 11-year excavation process. Today, more than half of the world’s intercontinental shipping passes through the canal.

1883

Brooklyn Bridge: 30 dead

The Brooklyn Bridge has linked Manhattan and Brooklyn since its completion in 1883 and is one of the most recognizable structures in the United States. What is surprising is that the bridge is more than a mile long and only employs 600 workers who worked for about 13 years for a salary of $2/day until it was completed. Of those 600 workers, 30 died, including the bridge’s designer, John A. Roebling, who broke his leg while measuring a compass and died of tetanus a few weeks later. The remaining casualties were falls, falling debris, and cases of caisson disease known as “The Bends”. Although the bridge is more than 130 years old, it still carries around 150,000 cars and pedestrians every day.

1889

Eiffel Tower: 1 dead

Built in 1889 as the gateway to the World’s Fair, the Eiffel Tower is easily one of the most recognizable structures in the world. The tower was completed in record time by a small crew of 300 workers and took a total construction time of just over 26 months. Of those 300 workers on site, only one fatality was attributed to the extensive use of safety nets and cordons. Today, the Eiffel Tower welcomes an impressive 7 million visitors a year.

1912

Titanic: 8 people died

Known as one of the most impressive feats of engineering of its time and one of the most celebrated disasters of the century, Titanic took three years and around 3,000 workers to complete ahead of its maiden voyage in 2016. 1912. Laborers earn about two pounds a week, worked 50 hours and drove about 3 million tunnels during construction. Eight workers died during construction at the Harland and Wolff shipyards, which is actually fewer than the 15 deaths originally expected for a project of this magnitude.

1913

Los Angeles Viaduct: 43 dead

Completed in 1913, the Los Angeles Aqueduct was responsible for the expansion of Los Angeles County into the large West Coast metropolis it is today. This 233-mile aqueduct took 4,000 laborers working for $2 a day to build, and when completed, it became the longest aqueduct and the largest aqueduct in the world. Conditions in the Owens Valley were hot, remote, and often dangerous, resulting in the deaths of 43 workers over the five-year construction period. However, after the completion of the aqueduct, the population of Los Angeles could skyrocket from 300,000 to more than 10 million today.

1914

Panama Canal: 30,609 dead

The Panama Canal, which connects the Pacific and Atlantic oceans for maritime trade, is one of the modern world’s most remarkable engineering achievements, and also one of its most dangerous. The 48-mile canal, managed by a number of different countries over a 32-year construction period, required around 75,000 workers from a variety of backgrounds. However, the area is known as the “Fever Coast,” with cases ranging from mild chickenpox to typhoid and yellow fever, killing 30,609 workers and hospitalizing thousands more. Coupled with poor working conditions, malnutrition and frequent accidents, the workers watched every night as their fallen comrades were transported in coffins.

1924

Sydney Harbor Bridge: 16 dead

One of Australia’s most recognizable landmarks, the Sydney Harbor Bridge connects Sydney’s CBD to the North Shore. It was completed in 1924 after 8 years of construction by around 2,500 workers and is the sixth longest arch bridge in the world. 16 workers died during construction; two were caused by a fall from the bridge, and two were caused by unsafe working conditions when heating and inserting the bridge’s six million bolts by hand.

1930

Empire State Building: 5 dead

Completed in 1930 after a frantic 13 months of construction, the Empire State Building is an American cultural icon that has held the record as the world’s tallest building for 42 years. The 3,400 workers, working for $15 a day, moved at a rapid pace, building 4.5 stories a week to completion. Although rumors have it that hundreds of people died during construction, official records show that the death toll stands at 5 workers who met their fate from accidental falls or from heavy objects.

1930

Chrysler Building: 0 deaths

Completed in 1930 after two years of construction, the Chrysler Building in New York was the world’s tallest building for just 11 months before it was surpassed by the Empire State Building. 3,000 workers, building at an average rate of 4 stories per week, manually placed nearly 4 million bricks until the building was completed. Surprisingly, despite the fast pace of completion, no workers were killed in the construction of the Chrysler Building.

1931

Hawk’s Nest Tunnel: 764 dead

The construction of a three-mile tunnel through Mount Gauley in West Virginia in 1931 is considered one of the worst industrial disasters in American history because of the certainty of death. The exact death toll for its 5,000 employees is difficult to determine, as many die from silicosis, an incurable lung disease that can take years to become fatal. For example, it is estimated that at least 764 of the 1213 men who worked underground in just 2 months died within 5 years of the tunnel’s completion, but other estimates put that number at more than 2000. So many of those workers who working for as little as 25 cents a day will almost certainly cost their lives if they stay underground for a relatively short time.

1933

White Sea-Baltic Canal: 12,000 dead

The White Sea-Baltic Canal, built entirely using the forced labor of prisoners, was completed in 1933 with the aim of bringing both military and economic benefits to the Soviet Union by connecting the two regions. Over a 20-month period, 126,000 workers were forced to dig 141 miles of canals, using nothing but hand tools and living in appalling conditions. Official records show that 12,000 prisoners died of starvation, cold and physical exhaustion, other estimates put the number at 25,000. Too bad the canal turned out to be too narrow and shallow for most boats so there is little or no traffic on the canal today.

1936

San Francisco Bay Bridge: 28 dead

Opened six months before the Golden Gate Bridge in 1936, the Bay Bridge was built as part of Interstate 80 to serve as a direct connection from San Francisco to Oakland. After three years and 8,300 people working for $7.75 a day, the nearly 4.5-mile bridge was completed. Five days of grand opening celebrations followed, drawing more than a million people and causing the largest traffic jam in San Francisco history. However, 28 workers were killed during construction, necessitating more advanced safety measures and creating a safety net for similar projects in the future.

1936

Hoover Dam: 96 dead

Built during the Great Depression as part of the New Deal programs, the Hoover Dam serves a number of purposes including providing jobs for the unemployed, controlling floods and providing irrigation and hydroelectric power generation. Opened in 1936, the project provided employment for 21,000 workers, who earned about $5 every 10 hours. Official statistics on “injuries at work” state that 96 workers die from explosions, falls, drowning or being hit by equipment, but does not take into account deaths from heat, illness or exhaustion, meaning the total number is likely to be much higher.

1937

Golden Gate Bridge: 11 dead

Known as one of the most scenic and awe-inspiring suspension bridges in the world, the Golden Gate spans a three-mile wide channel between San Francisco Bay and the Pacific Ocean. Completed in 1937, just months after the Bay Bridge, the Golden Gate was built by a series of 10 contractors who are no longer in business, so there is no official figure on the size of the labor force used to build it. However, only 11 people were recorded to have died during construction, 10 of whom had just one incident when a 5 ton aerial platform broke down. That number is low because Joseph Strauss, chief engineer, made safety a primary concern by spending $130,000 on the safety net and making it the first job site in the United States to require hard hats. These safety nets saved a total of 19 lives that later became known as “Club Halfway to Hell”.

1940

Fort Peck Dam: 60 dead

The Fort Peck Dam is another major project commissioned by Franklin Delano Roosevelt as part of the New Deal to boost job growth and harness hydroelectric power. The dam, the tallest of the six major dams along the Missouri River, took six long years and 50,000 workers to complete. Until it opened in 1940, workers worked 24 hours a day in three shifts for 50 cents an hour. 60 men died during construction from falls and dangerous conditions. After a massive landslide in 1938, the Fort Peck Dam is still one of the largest hydraulic earth dams in the world today.

1942

Grand Coulee Dam: 77 dead

Completed in 1942 to harness the power of the Columbia River to control flooding and provide irrigation water, the Grand Coulee Dam remains the largest electrical facility in the United States to date. After overcoming several legal hurdles, it took 9 years and 8,800 workers paying 80 cents an hour to complete this monumental project. 77 workers were killed during construction, mostly from falls and hazardous conditions. A third power plant was added to the dam between 1968 and 1975, killing four more people.

1943

Burma-Siamese Railway: 106,000 dead

Known as the “Death Railway,” this 258-mile road was completed in 1943 by Japanese prisoners of World War II to connect Bangkok and Burma. A collection of 275,000 British, Dutch, American, Australian and Asian POWs carried out the project in over a year, but it cost an estimated 106,000 lives due to appalling treatment, starvation and disease. For example, a section of railway known as Hellfire Pass was responsible for 20% of all Australian deaths throughout World War II. After the war ended, the Japanese leaders were tried on war crimes charges for atrocities against prisoners and sentenced 32 to death.

1957

Mackinac Bridge: 5 dead

Opened to traffic in 1957, the Mackinac Bridge was built to connect and improve traffic between Michigan’s Upper and Lower Peninsulas. Approximately 5 miles long, the bridge took 3,500 workers in 48 months to complete what is now the third longest suspension bridge in the world. Only five workers died during construction; One was in a car accident, one was in a sweat, one drowned, and two fell off the catwalk.

1970

World Trade Center: 60 dead

Completed in 1973, the World Trade Center is Manhattan’s commercial center and one of the most recognizable symbols of New York and the United States. Erected by a team of 3,500 workers at a time, the 110-story towers were the fifth and sixth tallest buildings in the world at the time of their demolition in 2001, a relatively high number considering how modern towers are.

1970

Aswan High Dam: 500 dead

To protect crops and control the frequent flooding of the Nile, the Aswan High Dam was started by the Egyptian government in 1960. For 10 years, 30,000 Egyptian workers died and 500 workers, the dam was completed and put into operation. However, the construction process required more than 90,000 people to relocate, and the quality of Egypt’s farmland deteriorated every year due to the lack of nutrient flows from the Nile.

1974

Sears Tower: 5 dead

The Sears Tower, also known as the Willis Tower, was completed in 1973 and is the second tallest building in the United States and currently the 12th tallest building in the world. It took 2,000 workers three years to complete the massive 1,450-foot structure, and the total cost was nearly $175 million. During construction, only 5 workers were killed in two separate incidents when a fire broke out in the elevator shaft and a worker fell off the ground on the 109th floor.

1977

Trans-Alaska Pipeline System: 32 fatalities

At 800 miles in length, the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) is one of the largest pipeline systems in the world and, at $8 billion, one of the largest privately funded construction projects in the world. The pipeline was built to transport crude oil from Alaska’s northernmost tip to the ice-free port of Valdez, where it will be loaded and shipped to US refineries. Working for $11 to $18 an hour, 27,300 laborers battled extremely cold conditions and permafrost for two years until its completion in 1977. According to records, 32 workers from Alyeska Pipeline Services Company were killed during construction due to extreme conditions and various accidents.

1978

Karakoram Expressway: 1,300 dead

The Karakoram Highway connects western China to the capital of Pakistan and runs 500 miles through some of Asia’s most impassable regions. With 24,000 workers and a construction time of almost 20 years, this highway is the highest paved international road in the world. With a year-round harsh climate, frequent earthquakes and frequent rockfalls, 1,300 people lost their lives during construction. Today, the highway exists primarily as a tourist attraction for climbers and cyclists.

2004

Taipei 101: 5 dead

Partly named for its 101 floors, Taipei 101, or the Taipei World Financial Center, is currently the sixth tallest building in the world. Completed in 2004 after six years, it is valued at $1.8 billion and employs 2000 people and is equipped with some of the most innovative safety features available as it is on many fault lines and on the street. Despite all these safety precautions, five workers died during construction when a 6.8 magnitude earthquake struck the building and brought down the crane.

2009

Downtown Las Vegas: 6 dead

At 76 acres and six massive towers on the Strip, the $9.2 billion CityCenter in Las Vegas is the largest privately funded development in the United States. The hotel was completed in three short years with a workforce of approximately 8,000 workers and opened to the public in late 2009. dubbed the project “City Cemetery” and briefly went on strike in 2008 over poor security conditions.

2015

Gotthard Base Tunnel: 8 dead

Estimated completion date of the project in 2016

The Gotthard Base Tunnel is considered the longest and deepest transport tunnel in the world and will serve as Switzerland’s new railway line through the Alps. It is widely regarded as the project of the century, and the 20-year construction period reflects its scale. When completed (estimated in 2016), the $10.3 billion ($9.8 billion) tunnel will include 94 miles of tunnels, shafts and passages.

2015

World Cup in Qatar: 6,750 dead

Estimated completion date in 2022 and estimated mortality used

To host the 2022 World Cup, Qatar built nine new stadiums, renovated three stadiums and built the infrastructure to host matches, players and fans. New roads, subway and rail systems, housing and even cities are being built as part of the promised infrastructure, all at the cost of thousands of lives and thousands of migrant workers. As of March 2021, an estimated 6,750 migrant workers have died working on host sites and infrastructure to host the 2022 World Cup. Due to a combination of heat exhaustion, long hours, poor living conditions and contracts that can result in workers being imprisoned for up to five years around two million migrant workers are subjected to slave-like conditions with no hope of improvement. Coupled with the fact that the Qatari government is ignoring the situation and actively concealing the evidence by sending journalists to jail for reporting on the severity of the conditions, the official death and damage toll may be much higher than the original . estimates.

The source:DIMARCO | ARAUJO | MONTEVIDEO

Video tutorials about how many people died building the empire state building

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The iconic Empire State Building was built in only 400 days.

Pretty impresive for a 400 meter high skyscraper.

During its construction from 1930 to 1931 at its peak 3000 men worked simultaneously at the construction site.

As you can see safety meassures were not taken too seriously.

But considering this the total number of deadly accidents was relatively low. Only 5 labourers died during the construction.

A sixth committed suïcide by jumping of the tower after he was fired.

Sadly dozens of people would follow suit within the following years by jumping of the tower.

In 1945 a terrible accident happened caused by the fog.

[RADIO]

14 people were killed.

In 1997another tragic event took place when a 69 year old Palestinian teacher opened fire on the observation deck.

Killing one person, wounding 6 and taking his own life.

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One of the world’s most famous skyscrapers has just been through a major 10-year modernisation project. See New York City’s 1930s icon has been updated for the modern age. This video is powered by Otis –

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