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“Body Ritual among the Nacirema” by Horace Miner

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  • Summary: Articles about “Body Ritual among the Nacirema” by Horace Miner The daily ceremonies, like the rites of the holy-mouth-men, involve discomfort and torture. With ritual precision, the vestals awaken their miserable charges …

  • Match the search results: While each family has at least one such shrine, the rituals associated with it are not family ceremonies but are private and secret. The rites are normally only discussed with children, and then only during the period when they are being initiated into these mysteries. I was able, however, to establ…

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Body Ritual among the Nacirema – MINER – 1956

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  • Summary: Articles about Body Ritual among the Nacirema – MINER – 1956 Volume 58, Issue 3 p. 503-507 American Anthropologist. Free Access. Body Ritual among the Nacirema. HORACE MINER,. HORACE MINER. University of Michigan.

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Body Ritual Among the Nacirema – ResearchGate

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  • Summary: Articles about Body Ritual Among the Nacirema – ResearchGate … The Body Ritual Among the Nacirema (Miner 1956 ) is an anthropological essay, a culture-free description of a man, a Nacirema, which …

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(PDF) “The Effect of Nacirema Body Ritual and Practices …

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  • Summary: Articles about (PDF) “The Effect of Nacirema Body Ritual and Practices … With the Body Ritual among the Nacirema is a satirized ethnographic profile of the Americans. · noticed that “Nacirema” word that means “American,” and this is …

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Body Ritual Among the Nacirema by Horace Miner – Goodreads

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  • Summary: Articles about Body Ritual Among the Nacirema by Horace Miner – Goodreads A Professor has done a study on a strange tribe called the Nacirema. However, this creepy tribe has a huge secret. They have strange ways and seems almost …

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Body Ritual Among the Nacirema

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  • Summary: Articles about Body Ritual Among the Nacirema One curing ceremony which takes place in this temple involves allowing the medicine men to cut out and throw away parts of their bodies. The Nacirema believe …

  • Match the search results: The magical beliefs and practices of a group of people known as the Nacirema are interesting because they are so unusual. The Nacirema have many magical beliefs, but the most interesting are those about their own bodies and how they should be cared for.The Nacirema are a group of people who live in …

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Body Ritual Among the Nacirema (Reprint Series in Social …

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  • Summary: Articles about Body Ritual Among the Nacirema (Reprint Series in Social … In “The Body Ritual Among the Nacirema” author Horace Miner’s anthropological satire of American (Nacirema spelled backwards) practices falls flat here.

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2. Body Ritual Among the Nacirema – De Gruyter

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  • Summary: Articles about 2. Body Ritual Among the Nacirema – De Gruyter Body Ritual Among the Nacirema. From the book Societal Culture and Management. Horace Miner. https://doi.org/10.1515/9783110856064.134. Cite this.

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Body Ritual Among the Nacirema | Vlady Steffel – The Ohio …

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  • Summary: Articles about Body Ritual Among the Nacirema | Vlady Steffel – The Ohio … Nacirema culture is characterized by a highly developed market economy which has evolved in a rich natural habitat. While much of the people’s time is devoted …

  • Match the search results: While each family has at least one such shrine, the rituals associated with it are not family ceremonies but are private and secret.  The rites are normally only discussed with children, and then only during the period when they are being initiated into these mysteries.  I was able, however, to esta…

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Body Ritual among the Nacirema – UMD DRUM – The …

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  • Summary: Articles about Body Ritual among the Nacirema – UMD DRUM – The … Citation. Miner, Horace (1956) Body Ritual among the Nacirema. American Anthropologist, 58 (3). pp. 503-507.

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Body Ritual among the Nacirema — A Note on Medical …

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  • Summary: Articles about Body Ritual among the Nacirema — A Note on Medical … CLYDE Kluckhohn, an anthropologist with a sharp eye for cultural common denominators, has pointed out that man is distinguished from other living organisms …

  • Match the search results: CLYDE Kluckhohn, an anthropologist with a sharp eye for cultural common denominators, has pointed out that man is distinguished from other living organisms by three characteristics of human activity: the systematic making of tools; the use of abstract language; and religion. Religion is a broad term…

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Tag Archives: Body Ritual among the Nacirema – Teaching …

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  • Summary: Articles about Tag Archives: Body Ritual among the Nacirema – Teaching … Tag Archives: Body Ritual among the Nacirema. Studying Science, Studying Up. When I began my research at the bioscience facility at the University of Prince …

  • Match the search results: When I began my research at the bioscience facility at the University of Prince Edward Island—it’s also the campus where I teach—I didn’t have a particular audience in mind. At the time I was much more concerned with making the most of my opportunity to “study up,” in Laura Nader’s phras…

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Multi-read content the body ritual among the nacirema

Most cultures exhibit a specific configuration or style. A single value or worldview often shapes multiple institutions in a society. Examples include “macismo” in Spanish-influenced cultures, “face” in Japanese culture, and “female pollution” in some highland New Guinea cultures. Here Horace Miner shows that “body attitudes” have a pervasive effect on many institutions in Nacirema society.

The anthropologist is so familiar with the variety of behavior of different people in similar situations that he can marvel at the strangest customs. Unless all possible combinations of possible behaviors were found somewhere in the world, he would probably guess that they must be present in an undeclared strain. In fact, the problem was raised by Murdock about the organization of the clan[First]. In this light, Nacirema’s magical beliefs and practices exhibit aspects that are so unusual that it is desirable to describe them as examples of the extremes to which human behavior can lead.

Professor Linton[2]The Nacirema ritual first caught the attention of anthropologists twenty years ago, but the culture of this people is still poorly understood. They are a group of North Americans living in the territory between the Cree of Canada, the Yaqui and Tarahumare of Mexico and the Caribbean, and the Arawak of the Antilles. Little is known of their origins, although tradition has it that they came from the East. According to Nacirema mythology, her people descended from a culture hero named Notgnihsaw, known for two great feats – throwing a chunk of waffle across the Pa To Mac River and chopping down an English tree. where the spirit of truth dwells.

The Nacirema culture is characterized by a very developed market economy that developed in a rich natural habitat. Although most of the people’s time is devoted to economic purposes, a large portion of the fruits of these people’s labors and a significant portion of the day are devoted to ceremonial activities. The focus of this activity is the human body, whose appearance and health are the dominant concern in people’s character. While such an interest is certainly not uncommon, the ritual and philosophical aspects involved are unique.

The underlying belief of the entire system seems to be that the human body is ugly and its natural tendency is to be weak and sick. When man wears such a body, his only hope is to suppress these qualities through the use of rituals and ceremonies. Every household has one or more shrines dedicated to this purpose. More powerful individuals in society have multiple shrines in their homes, and indeed the opulence of a home is often viewed in terms of the number of ceremonial centers it possesses. Most houses were built of brick and wood, but the shrine rooms of the richer were built of stone. Poor families imitated the rich by pasting ceramic plaques to their prayer walls.

While every family has at least one such shrine, the rituals that accompany it are not family rites but private and secret. Rituals are usually only discussed with children and then only initiated into these mysteries over time. However, I was able to develop a sufficient relationship with the natives to inspect these temples and perform the rituals described for me.

The focal point of the shrine is a box or chest built into the wall. There are so many spells and potions stored in this chest that no native believes they can live. These preparations are guaranteed by many medical specialists. The most powerful of these are the medical professions, whose help must be rewarded with considerable gifts. However, the healing professions do not provide their clients with medicines, but decide what the ingredients are supposed to be and then write them down in an ancient and secret language. This script is understood only by physicians and herbalists who hand out amulets and ask for another gift.

The talisman, having served its purpose, is not thrown away, but placed in the talisman of the family shrine. Since these magical materials are reserved for specific ailments, and real or imagined diseases abound, the magic chest is often filled to the brim. Magic Packs are so numerous that people forget their purpose and are afraid to use them again. While the natives are very vague on this point, we can only assume that the idea of ​​keeping all the ancient magical materials, their presence in the amulet box from the body rituals being performed will protect the worshiper in some way.

There is small writing under the charm field. Every day, each family member would enter the shrine room in turn, bow to the talisman, mix different types of holy water in the background, and perform a brief purification ritual.[3]. The holy water is protected from the community’s water temple, where priests perform elaborate rituals to ritually purify the liquid.

Within the hierarchy of magical practitioners and among those of eminence in medicine there are specialists whose designation can best be translated as “holy men”. Nacirema has an almost pathological fear and fascination with the mouth, a condition believed to have supernatural effects on all social relationships. They believe teeth will fall out, gums will bleed, jaws will shrink, friends will desert them, and lovers will reject them. They also believe that there is a strong relationship between oral and moral qualities. For example, there is a ritual for removing children’s mouths that is said to improve their moral fiber.

Daily body rituals performed by all include an oral ritual. Despite the fact that these people are very aggressive[4] In terms of oral care, this ritual is a practice that makes unfamiliar strangers rebellious. I am told that the ritual consisted of stuffing a small bundle of pig hair in one’s mouth along with some sort of magic powder, and then moving the bundle in a series of celebratory gestures.[5]

In addition to their own word of mouth ritual, people look for a man to spread word of mouth once or twice a year. These practitioners have an impressive array of tools including a variety of drills, awls, converters and products. The use of these items for oral exorcisms where clients are ritually tortured is almost unbelievable. The holy man opens the client’s mouth and uses the tools mentioned above to widen any cavities that decay may have left in the teeth. Magical material is inserted into these holes. If there is no natural hole in the tooth, large sections of one or more teeth are cut out so that the excess can be applied. The purpose of these missions is from the customer perspective[6]is to stop the decay and make friends. The highly sacred and traditional character of the ceremony is evidenced by the fact that the natives return to the men orally year after year, despite the continuing decay of their teeth.

It is hoped that with a thorough investigation of Nacirema, there will also be a thorough investigation of the personality structure of these people. One had only to observe the twinkle in a holy man’s eyes as he stabbed an awl into an exposed nerve to suspect a masochistic act was involved. If this can be determined, a very interesting pattern emerges, showing clear masochistic tendencies for the majority of the population. It’s these things that Professor Linton mentioned when speaking about a certain part of the daily body ritual that is performed only by men. This part of the ritual consists of scratching and tearing the surface of the face with a sharp instrument. The rituals of special women are performed only four times in each lunar month, but what they lack in frequency is performed in a barbaric manner. As part of this ritual, women bake their heads in a small oven for about an hour. It is theoretically interesting that people who appear to be sadists first develop into experts in sadism.

Those who practice medicine have a majestic temple, don’t theyLatipso, in all communities of all sizes. The more elaborate rituals required to treat the seriously ill could only be performed in this temple. These rituals are not unique to the thaumaturge[7]but a constant group of robed young women moving gracefully through the temple chambers in distinctive headgear and dress.

ThatLatipsoThe rituals were so extreme that it was a phenomenon that a significant proportion of the natives who entered the temple who were actually ill never recovered. Young children who have not yet perfected their teaching skills are known to resist attempts to take them to the temple because “that is where one dies.” Despite this, sick adults are not only willing but eager to undergo prolonged ritual purification if they can afford it. No matter how ill the beggar is, or how serious the emergency, the guards of many temples will not let a customer in if they cannot present a bounty to the guard. Even if one achieved the rituals and survived, the Wardens would not allow the new creature to leave until one more gift was made.

People asking to enter the temple are first stripped of their clothing. In everyday life, Nacirema avoids contact with the body and its natural functions. Bathing and excretion activities were only performed in secret at the household temple, where they were performed as part of body rituals. Psychogenic shock is the result of the body’s sudden loss of its ability to secrecy upon onsetLatipso. A man whose own wife has never seen him perform an act of excrement suddenly finds himself naked and propped up by a girl in a vest as he performs self-functions in nature into a sacred vessel. Necessary for this type of ritual treatment is that the stool is used by a specialist to determine the course and nature of the client’s illness. In contrast, when clients see her naked body, they are exposed to the scrutiny, manipulation, and incitement of the doctors.

Few of the temple beggars are sane enough to do anything but lie on their hard beds. Daily rituals, like those of holy men, involved discomfort and torture. With ceremonial precision, vest wearers awaken their dawn woes and roll them on the bed of torment while performing the futile maneuvers, in the formal movements the young women have. At other times, they stick wands in the petitioner’s mouth or force him to ingest substances believed to have healing properties. Occasionally, healers come to their clients and miraculously insert the treated needles into their skin. The reality is that while these temple ceremonies do not cure diseases or even kill germs, they in no way diminish people’s trust in medicinal herbs.

There is another type of practitioner called a “listener.” This sorcerer has the power to cast out the demons that lurk in the minds of the bewitched. Nacirema believes that parents fascinate their children. Mothers are particularly suspected of cursing their children by teaching them secret body rituals. The caster’s countermagic is unusual in that it lacks ritual. The patient simply tells the “listener” all of their worries and fears, beginning with the earliest troubles they can remember. The memory displayed by Nacirema during these exorcisms is truly remarkable. It’s not uncommon for patients to lament the rejection he felt when he was weaned as a child, and some have even found their problems returning to the traumatic aftermath of the process of their own birth.

In summary, certain practices are rooted in indigenous aesthetics but rooted in a widespread dislike of the natural body and its functions. There are fasting rituals to make the fat thin and rituals to make the thin fat. Still other rituals are used to make women’s breasts larger when they are small and smaller when they are tall. The general dissatisfaction with the shape of the breast is expressed in the fact that the ideal shape is usually outside the range of human variation. Some women with almost inhuman gynecomastia are so idolized that they earn a living simply by going from village to village and having natives stare at them to pay fees.

It has already been mentioned that the elimination functions are performed ritually, mechanized, and brought into a secret state. The natural reproductive functions are similarly distorted. Sexual intercourse is a taboo subject and planned as an act. People have attempted to avoid pregnancy by using magical materials or by restricting intercourse to certain phases of the moon. Conception is actually very rare. During pregnancy, women dress like this to hide their condition. The birth takes place in secret, without the support of friends or family, and most women do not breastfeed.

Our review of the ritual life of the Nacirema has certainly shown that they are magical vehicles. It’s hard to understand how they could last so long under the burden they put on themselves. But even such strange customs have real meaning when viewed through Malinowski’s insight.[8th]when he wrote:

From afar and viewed from above, from our highly secure seats in advanced civilization, we can easily discern all that is gross and irrelevant in magic. But without their strength and guidance man could not at first master his practical difficulties, nor advance to the higher stages of civilization.

Footnotes added by Dowell and edited by Chase

  1. Murdock, George P. 1949.
  2. social structure
  3. . NY: The Macmillan Co., p. 71. George Peter Murdock (1897-1996 [?]) was a famous ethnographer.
  4. Linton, Ralph. 1936
  5. human studies
  6. . NY: D. Appleton-Century Co. p. 326. Ralph Linton (1893-1953) is best known for his studies of the coding process (that all cultures are learned and not inherited; the cultural process of a society. Society is shaped by a passed on from generation to next). , which claims culture is the “social genetics” of humanity.
  7. Wash or clean the body or any part of the body. From the Latin abluere, to wash
  8. Characterized by strict observance of the subtleties of formal etiquette and behavior.
  9. It’s worth noting that since conducting Professor Miner’s original research, Nacirema has largely abandoned her natural hair in her private oral ritual in favor of using a synthetic polymerization base oil. Also, the powders associated with this ritual are often sold liquefied. Other updates to the Nacirema culture are excluded in this document for the sake of economy.
  10. Tends to perform religious or other important functions
  11. A wonderful employee.
  12. Malinowski, Bronislaw.
  13. Magic, Science and Religion
  14. . Glencoe: The Free Press, p. 70. Bronislaw Malinowski (1884-1942) was a famous cultural anthropologist best known for arguing that human beings everywhere share biological and psychological needs and that the function of all cultural institutions is to serve these to satisfy needs; The nature of the institution is determined by its function.

Video tutorials about the body ritual among the nacirema

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A brief summary of the the Article “Body Rituals of the Nacirema,” by Horace Miner

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This is a movie version of the famous essay by Horace Miner. The essay is a classic in the study of anthropology, and the video is useful in a variety of other disciplines including my classes on African art history. This is an example of the outsider looking in a culture and making judgments about it based on his own cultural bias.

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This is the new and improved version of my reading of Horace Miner’s “Body Ritual among the Nacirema”. This is the full text read clearly and fluently. All credit goes to the original author, Horace Miner, and his publication for the material narrated. If you’re interested in anything comedic, interesting, filmic, or philosophical.

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