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On this day, the Seneca Falls Convention begins – National …

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The Seneca Falls Convention: Setting the National Stage for …

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  • Summary: Articles about The Seneca Falls Convention: Setting the National Stage for … Although the convention became best known for its demand for women’s right to vote, the Declaration of Sentiments covered a wide agenda, asserting that women …

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Seneca Falls Convention – Wikipedia

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  • Summary: Articles about Seneca Falls Convention – Wikipedia The Seneca Falls Convention was the first women’s rights convention. It advertised itself as “a convention to discuss the social, civil, and religious …

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Today in History – July 19 | Library of Congress

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  • Summary: Articles about Today in History – July 19 | Library of Congress The Seneca Falls Convention | John Muir. … in America Singing: Nineteenth-Century Song Sheets, urges the cause of women’s rights.

  • Match the search results: On July 19, 1848, the Seneca Falls Convention convened. Heralded as the first American women’s rights convention, the two day event was held in the Wesleyan Chapel in Seneca Falls, New York. The convention had been advertised on July 11, 1848 in the Seneca County Courier. Despite the minimal a…

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Seneca Falls and Building a Movement, 1776–1890

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  • Summary: Articles about Seneca Falls and Building a Movement, 1776–1890 The beginning of the American women’s suffrage movement is often marked by either the 1848 women’s rights convention in Seneca Falls, New York, or the earlier …

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  • Summary: Articles about Seneca Falls Convention | HistoryNet The Declaration of Sentiments became the blueprint for the women’s rights movement and for the suffrage movement, which soon gained national attention. Stanton, …

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The Women’s Rights Movement and the Women of Seneca Falls

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  • Summary: Articles about The Women’s Rights Movement and the Women of Seneca Falls Historians and other scholars agree that the leaders of the Seneca Falls Convention played a significant role in shaping the first wave of …

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Seneca Falls Convention – Ohio History Central

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  • Summary: Articles about Seneca Falls Convention – Ohio History Central Organizers of the event refused to allow the two women to participate because of their sex. Mott and Stanton did not act upon their idea for a convention for …

  • Match the search results: In July 1848, Mott, a member of the Society of Friends, was visiting her sister in Waterloo, New York. A group of local Quakers had asked Stanton, a resident of nearby Seneca Falls, to discuss her activities in the abolitionist movement. At this meeting, Mott and Stanton renewed their acquaintancesh…

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Women’s Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, NY – University …

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  • Summary: Articles about Women’s Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, NY – University … Elizabeth Cady Stanton organized the first Women’s Rights Convention in 1848 … until that meeting at Seneca Falls in 1848, of the pioneers in the cause, …

  • Match the search results: Why Seneca Falls? A significant reform community emerged in western New York in the 1830s and 40s. Among these reformers were abolitionists who joined relatives and started businesses in Seneca Falls and Waterloo. Here and elsewhere, Quaker women such as Philadelphia Lucretia Mott took an active rol…

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Seneca Falls Convention: For Women, By Women – Academy …

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  • Match the search results: Held in Seneca Falls, New York, in 1848, the Seneca Falls Convention was one of the first women’s rights events to take place in the United States. Led by Elizabeth Stanton and Lucretia Mott, the main purpose was to have “a convention to discuss the social, civil, and religious condition and rights …

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Seneca Falls Convention: First Women’s Rights Convention

Announcement of forthcoming “Convention on Women’s Rights” inSeneca County CourierAlthough small, it caught the attention of Charlotte Woodward. On the morning of July 19, 1848, the 19-year-old glover drove to the Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in the town of Seneca Falls, New York. To her surprise, Woodward found dozens of other women and a group of men waiting to enter the chapel, all as eager as she was to find out what a discussion of “social, civil rights” and women’s religion can do .

The convention is the brainchild of 32-year-old Elizabeth Cady Stanton, daughter of Margaret and Judge Daniel Cady and wife of Henry Stanton, a prominent abolitionist politician. Born in Johnstown, New York, Cady Stanton displayed both intelligence and a rebellious spirit from an early age. By being exposed to her father’s law books as well as his conservative views of women, she openly protested the legal and educational disadvantages that women of her day faced for working. In 1840 she angered her father by marrying Stanton, a handsome, liberal reformer, and further defied convention by deliberately omitting the word “obey” from her marriage vows.

Her marriage to Henry Stanton brought Elizabeth Cady Stanton – who insisted on keeping her maiden name – into contact with other independent women. The newlyweds honeymooned at the World Anti-Slavery Conference in London, where, to their great dismay, female delegates were denied their seats and stripped of their votes in the process. The seven women, who were relegated to a curtained visitors’ gallery, listened in stunned silence as the London Certification Commission accused them of being “constitutionally unfit for public gatherings, community and business.” It was an insult that Cady Stanton never forgot.

Among the delegates was Lucretia Coffin Mott, a hicksite Quaker libertarian preacher and successful speaker in the American abolitionist movement, who was also disillusioned with the lack of property rights for women. Mott, a mother of six, grew up on Nantucket Island “penetrated deeply by women’s rights,” she later admitted, “it was the most important issue of my life from a young age.” Ally and role model at the same time. “When I first heard her say that I have the right to think of myself as Luther, Calvin and John Knox,” she recalls, “and I also have the right to be guided by my own beliefs. . . I felt a newborn sense of freedom and dignity. “The two women quickly became friends and talked about the need for a conference to discuss itladiesEmancipation. However, eight years passed before they achieved their common goal.

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During the early years of their marriage, Cady Stanton settled happily into a middle-class family life, first in Johnstown and then in Boston, the center of reformist activism at the time. She enjoyed being part of her husband’s stimulating intellectual and reformist circle and enjoying the glory of motherhood; In a span of 17 years she gave birth to seven children. In 1847, however, the Stantons moved to Seneca Falls, a small, remote farming and manufacturing community in the Finger Lakes area of ​​New York. After Boston, Cady Stanton found life in Seneca Falls dreary, full of routine household chores, and she continued to defy conditions that restricted women’s lives. “My experience at World Anti presented an opportunity for action.

On July 13, Cady Stanton received an invitation to a tea party at the home of Jane and Richard Hunt, wealthy Quakers living in Waterloo, New York, just three miles west of Seneca Falls. There she reunited with Mott, her sister Martha Coffin Wright, and Mary Ann McClintock, wife of Waterloo Minister Hicksite Quaker. During the tea session, Cady Stanton told the group that “currents of my longstanding discontent were piling up.” They then decided to schedule a women’s “conference” for the following week. Hoping to attract a large audience, they placed an unsigned noteexpress delivery, applies Lucretia Mott as keynote speaker.

Panic almost gripped the five feminists as they gathered around the McClintocks’ table the following Sunday morning. They had only three days to set the agenda and prepare documents “for the start of an uprising.” The document states that “all men and women are created equal” and “certain inalienable rights were given by their Creator…” These natural rights belong to all women and men, but man “has usurped and asserted the throne of Jehovah’s own prerogative it. how his right assigns her a sphere of action when it belongs to her conscience and to her God. The “result” establishes an absolute tyranny over them. ”

There is a specific category of injustice. Women are denied access to higher education, jobs and pulpits, and equal pay for equal work. If they are married they have no property rights; even the wages they legally earn belong to their husbands. Wives are subject to a different moral code, but have a legal obligation to tolerate their husbands’ unethical behavior. Wives can be punished, and in the event of a divorce, the mother does not have custody of the children. In any case, the man was trying to destroy [the woman’s] confidence in her own strength, lower her self-esteem and make her willing to lead a sideline, clingy and depressed. “Most importantly, every woman” has been “deprived of her inalienable right to choose.” ‘

Eleven resolutions asking that these and other grievances be addressed accompany the nearly 1,000-word statement. When Cady Stanton insisted on a resolution in support of women’s suffrage, her other supportive husband threatened to boycott the event. Even Lucretia Mott warned her, “Why Lizzie, she’s going to ridicule us!” “Lizzie,” however, refused to back down.

Although the meeting was a women’s and women’s conference, it was considered “invisible” for a woman to hold a public meeting, so James Mott, Lucretia’s husband, agreed to chair it. The event lasted two days . Mary Ann McClintock’s husband Thomas was also involved. Henry Stanton leaves town.

When organizers arrived at Wesleyan Chapel on Wednesday morning, July 19, they found the door locked. No one had a key, so Cady Stanton’s young grandson climbed in the open window and unlocked the front door. As the church filled with spectators, another dilemma arose. The first day’s sessions were scheduled exclusively for women, but nearly 40 men attended. After a hasty deliberation at the altar, the leadership decided to let the men stay as they were already seated and seemed genuinely interested.

Tall and formal in his Quaker suit, James Mott called the first meeting at 11:00 am and appointed the McClintocks’ eldest daughter (also called Mary Ann) as secretary. Cady Stanton articulated the purpose of the convention in his first public address. “We have met here today to discuss our civil and political rights and wrongs.” She then read the statement paragraph by paragraph and invited everyone present to participate freely in the discussions. The declaration was read several times, revised and approved unanimously. Both Lucretia Mott and Cady Stanton spoke during the afternoon session, as did the McClintocks’ baby daughter, Elizabeth. To shed some light on what was happening, Mott read a satirical article about the “Frauenfeld” that her sister Martha had published in the local newspaper. Later that evening, Mott addressed a larger audience on “The Advancement of Reform.”

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The sessions of the second day are given for 11 resolutions. As Mott feared, the most controversial point was the ninth resolution – on the right to vote. The remaining 10 voted unanimously. According to Cady Stanton’s report, most of those who opposed the resolution did so because they believed it would harm others. However, she persisted. “That the drunkards, the blockheads, the horse-race rowers, the ignorant foreigners and the stupid boys should be given full credit while we ourselves are deprived of all the rights that belong to the citizens is too offensive to be tacitly obeyed. The right is ours. We must have it. “Even Cady Stanton’s eloquence would not carry through, but due to the strong support she received from Frederick Douglass, the abolitionist editor and former slave of thenorth star. “Rights have no gender,” he argued; Women are “rightly entitled to whatever we ask of men”. After many heated debates, the ninth resolution was passed – narrowly.

Thomas McClintock chaired Thursday night’s final session, reading excerpts from Sir William Blackstone’s bookCommentaries on the Laws of Englanddescribed the status of women in English common law. Brief speeches by Mary Ann McClintock and Frederick Douglass after reading a poem by Cady Stanton in reply to a signed pastoral letter from the Lords of Creation. Lucretia Mott ended the meeting with a call to action, adding to herself: “The rapid success of our careers depends on the enthusiastic and tireless efforts of men and women to overthrow the monopoly of the podium, and the equal participation of women and To ensure men in various professions, occupations and in commerce. “That too was approved unanimously.

A total of about 300 people attended the Seneca Falls Conference. Most are ordinary people like Charlotte Woodward. Most sat for 18 hours speaking, debating and reading. One hundred of them – 68 women (including Woodward) and 32 men – signed the final draft of the Statement of Opinions and Resolutions. Women’s rights as an independent reform movement were born.

Press coverage was surprisingly widespread and generally vicious, particularly on the issue of women’s suffrage. Philadelphia’sPublic ledger and daily scoreboardstated that no woman wanted to vote. “Women are nobody. wife is everything The women of Philadelphia,. . . determined to uphold their rights as wife, bell, virgin and mother. “According to Albanymechanic supporter, Equality would “dismay and demean [women] from their exalted status and destiny.” . . and proved a terrible wound for all mankind. ‘New York Heraldreleased the full text of Seneca Falls’ statement, calling it “interesting” but acknowledging that Lucretia Mott “would make a better president than some who recently hired the White House.” freelance editor of Horace Greeley’sNew York Tribune. Greeley found the claim to politically equal rights inappropriate, but “whether it is unwise and wrong to say it is a claim to a natural right and must be recognized as such.”

Outraged by the public outcry, many of the original signers asked to have their names removed from the statement. Cady Stanton complained, “Our friends gave us the cold shoulder and felt humiliated by the whole process. Many women sympathized with the aims of the congress but feared stigmatization for attending future meetings. Senator William Seward’s wife said: “I’m all for you, but I’m a natural born coward. I fear nothing more than Mr. Seward’s taunts. “

But Cady Stanton saw an opportunity in the face of public criticism. “Imagine the public promoting our idea by writing in a widely circulated newspaper such asemissary! “She wrote Mott. “Women and men will start thinking, too.” She drafts lengthy responses to every negative article and editorial, presenting her readers with the reformist side of the matter. Mott anticipates the future role of her younger colleague. “Your art is a great fit for this cause,” she told Cady Stanton.

News of the Seneca Falls Convention spread quickly and inspired many women’s rights gatherings in the area. Beginning with the next meeting two weeks later in Rochester, New York, all subsequent women’s rights forums have had female seats. New England abolitionist Lucy Stone organized the first national convention in 1850 in Worcester, Massachusetts. When Stone was criticized for including women’s rights in her anti-slavery speeches, she countered, “I was a woman before I was an abolitionist — I have to speak for women.”

Quaker reformer Susan B. Anthony joined the women’s rights movement in 1852. Of course she’d heard about the Seneca Falls Convention; Her parents and sister attended the 1848 Rochester meeting. At first, however, she considered his goals secondary to being moderate and anti-slavery. All that changed in 1851 when she met Cady Stanton, with whom she formed a long political partnership. Tied to the domestic scene by her growing family, Cady Stanton wrote articles, speeches, and letters; Anthony, who has never been married, has traveled the country speaking and organizing women’s rights groups. As Cady Stanton later said, “I made flashes and she shot them.” Over time, Susan B. Anthony’s name has become synonymous with women’s rights.

Women’s rights conventions, held every year up until the Civil War, which received most support from the abolitionist and peaceful movements. After the war, feminist leaders split over black men’s exclusion of women from the rule of law. Abolitionists argued that it was “black hour” and that the inclusion of women’s suffrage jeopardized the passage of the Fifteenth Amendment, which had already got rid of former slaves. Cady Stanton and Anthony, feeling betrayed by their former allies, reject the 15th Amendment. Their protests alienated the more cautious wing of the movement and created two organizations vying for the right to vote.

In 1869, Lucy Stone, Julia Ward Howe – famous as the author ofRepublican Anthem–And others formed the American Women of Moderates Association (AWSA), while Cady Stanton, Anthony, Martha Wright and the Radicals formed the National Liberal Women’s Association (NWSA). Lucretia Mott, now an elderly widow, tried in vain to reconcile the two sides.

Both organizations strove for political equality for women, but the more radical NWSA actively championed issues beyond suffrage. Guided by the original Seneca Falls resolutions, the NWSA calls for an end to all laws and practices that discriminate against women and calls for reform of divorce laws, equal pay and access to higher education and jobs, organized religious reform and a total rethink of Cady Stanton, who speaks publicly about women’s sexuality and condemns the Victorian double standards that forced women to put up with drunk, abusive and cocky husbands. Anthony defies – and sometimes practices – civil disobedience; In 1872 she was arrested for illegal voting in the presidential elections.

When the two rival organizations merged to form the National Association of American Women for the Interest (NAWSA) in 1890, much had been accomplished. Many states have enacted laws giving married women property rights, equal custody of their children, and legal status to execute contracts and lawsuits. Almost a third of college students are women, and 19 states allow women to vote in local school board elections. In the two western territories – Wyoming and Utah – women voted equally with men. But full national suffrage remained elusive. NAWSA began a protracted interstate struggle for voting rights.

NAWSA’s first two Presidents were Cady Stanton and Anthony, both in their 70s. Age faded in none of them, especially Cady Stanton. Once a rebel, she criticized NAWSA’s narrow-mindedness and became increasingly suspicious of NAWSA’s newly acquired pious taboo allies. NAWSA membership must be inclusive of all “kinds and classes, races and creeds” and resist intrusive indoctrination that has attempted to hide a broader women’s liberation agenda.

Cady Stanton has long advocated organized religious reform. “The chief obstacle to woman’s advancement today is the abominable position ascribed to her in the religions of all nations,” she wrote. Whenever women attempt to expand their “spiritual endowments,” the all-male missionary establishment condemns them as breaking “God’s law.” The use of the Bible to justify the inferiority of women delighted her. In 1895 she publishedWoman’s Bible, a critical commentary on the negative image of women in the Old and New Testaments. Even Anthony thinks she’s gone too far this time and can’t do more to stop heartbroken conservatives from venting their anger. During NAWSA’s annual conference, both the book and its author were publicly censored. As a result, fundamentalists will belittle Cady Stanton’s historical role, preferring to portray Susan B. Anthony as the movement’s senior stateswoman.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton died in 1902 at the age of 83 and Susan B. Anthony at the age of 86 in 1906. By then a new generation of suffrage leaders had emerged—younger, better educated, and less restrictive than in the country. The now venerable middle-class leadership of NAWSA has taken a “social feminist” stance, arguing that women are de factodifferenceof men and therefore needed voices to bring their distinctive qualities to bear on the nation’s political affairs.

But more fighters, including Quaker agitator Alice Paul and Cady Stanton’s daughter Harriot Stanton Blatch, continued to emphasize absolute equality for women. They called for a nationwide change in electoral law as a necessary first step to achieving equality.

Victory in the voting rights issue came after the First World War. Impressed by the involvement of those suffering from the war effort, in 1919 Congress passed what became known as the “Susan B. Anthony Amendment.” After state ratification a year later, he adopted American women nationally under the Nineteenth Amendment.

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It has been more than 72 years since the bold call for women’s suffrage was made at the Seneca Falls Convention. On November 2, 1920, Charlotte Woodward Pierce, 91, went to the polls in Philadelphia, the only signer of the Seneca Falls Declaration to live long enough to vote in a presidential election.

This article was written by Constance B. Rynder and was first published in the April 1999 issueamerican HistoryDiary. Subscribe for more great articlesamerican Historymagazine today!

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Learn about the movement for women’s equality that precipitated the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848, and what its attendees – including Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia Mott – hoped to achieve.

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Uploaded on the 167th anniversary of the Seneca Falls Convention, we take a look at the big idea of women’s rights in the 19th century as well as some interesting facts about the convention. Read the Declaration of Sentiments

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Originally known as the Woman’s Rights Convention, the event was organised by slavery abolitionists Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Having travelled to the 1840 World Anti-Slavery Convention in London, they had found themselves unable to participate and were inspired to take up the fight for women’s rights.

Held in the Wesleyan Methodist Chapel at Seneca Falls, their two-day conference set out to ‘discuss the social, civil, and religious condition and rights of women’. Although some men did attend the first day was exclusively for women. Discussion was focused on the ‘Declaration of Rights and Sentiments’ that Stanton had drafted a few days earlier. Modelled on the text of the United States Declaration of Independence with adjusted wording that recognised the equality of women, the Declaration of Sentiments include twelve resolutions that were voted on the next day.

All the resolutions were approved unanimously except for one. The resolution, which demanded women be given the right to vote, had been included by Elizabeth Stanton but was opposed by her friend and co-organiser Lucretia Mott for being too controversial. Others at the meeting shared the concern that its inclusion could undermine their other efforts for equality. Nevertheless the resolution found support from Frederick Douglass, the only African American at the meeting, and was eventually approved.

The Declaration of Sentiments was signed by 68 women and 32 men of the 300 conference participants and, although the document was later publicly ridiculed, it served as an important foundation for the women’s suffrage movement in the United States.

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