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75 years ago, what if Japan never attacked Pearl Harbor?

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  • Summary: Articles about 75 years ago, what if Japan never attacked Pearl Harbor? But even if Japan had not attacked Pearl Harbor, it’s quite likely that the two sides would have still clashed.

  • Match the search results: Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto, the Japanese naval commander, hoped his plan to attack on Pearl Harbor would deliver a fatal blow to American capabilities in the Pacific and persuade Washington to push for a political settlement. Otherwise, he knew that his country stood no chance against the United State…

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What if Japan Hadn’t Attacked Pearl Harbor? | HistoryNet

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  • Summary: Articles about What if Japan Hadn’t Attacked Pearl Harbor? | HistoryNet What if Japan Hadn’t Attacked Pearl Harbor? We explore the scenarios that might have occurred had the U.S. not suffered the Pearl Harbor attack.

  • Match the search results: Ironically, by refusing to run such an operational risk, they wound up taking an even larger strategic risk, for the attack on Pearl Harbor was premised on the highly tenuous assumption of a short war with the United States followed by a negotiated peace that would allow Japan to keep its territoria…

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Without Pearl Harbor, a different world? – CNN

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  • Summary: Articles about Without Pearl Harbor, a different world? – CNN On the 75th anniversary of Pearl Harbor, we’ve been asked to reflect on what might have happened if Japan had not launched an attack on the …

  • Match the search results: (CNN)Oliver Stone is an Academy Awarding winning Hollywood writer and director. Peter Kuznick is professor of history and director of the Nuclear Studies Institute at American University. Together they co-authored the documentary film and book series titled The Untold History of the United States. …

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Read What If… Japan Didn’t Attack Pearl Harbor? Online – Scribd

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  • Summary: Articles about Read What If… Japan Didn’t Attack Pearl Harbor? Online – Scribd What If… Japan Didn’t Attack Pearl Harbor? – Read online for free. Sunday, 7 December 1941: a day that changed the course of World War II.

  • Match the search results: At the most extreme, no attack on Pearl Harbor could have meant no US entering the war, no ships of soldiers pouring over the Atlantic, and no D-Day, all putting ‘victory in Europe’ in doubt. On the other side of the world, it

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3 Myths About Pearl Harbor, According to a Military Historian

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  • Summary: Articles about 3 Myths About Pearl Harbor, According to a Military Historian Tuesday marks the 80th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, killing some 2,400 American servicemen and …

  • Match the search results: President Franklin D. Roosevelt had already instated the military draft in the fall of 1940, over a year before Pearl Harbor. By the time Pearl Harbor was attacked, the total number of men in uniform was over 2 million. Months before Pearl Harbor, this new draft army was already being put through th…

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Pearl Harbor (article) | World War II | Khan Academy

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  • Summary: Articles about Pearl Harbor (article) | World War II | Khan Academy What was the American response to the Japanese attack? Do you think the United States would have entered World War II if the Japanese had not bombed Pearl …

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What If Japan Hadn’t Attacked Pearl Harbor?

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  • Summary: Articles about What If Japan Hadn’t Attacked Pearl Harbor? In the time it would have taken the US Pacific Fleet to respond and sail west to reclaim the Philippines, Japan could have built multiple …

  • Match the search results: The Imperial Japanese Navy would have been in a much stronger position to repel an American response, which in any case would have been more muted than the response after the attack on Pearl Harbor. Part of the reason the attack on Pearl Harbor provoked such a strong response throughout the United S…

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Why did Japan attack Pearl Harbor? | Imperial War Museums

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  • Summary: Articles about Why did Japan attack Pearl Harbor? | Imperial War Museums On 7 December 1941, Japan launched a surprise air attack on the US naval base at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. Japanese forces also overran Allied possessions in …

  • Match the search results: Japan attacked the U.S Pacific Fleet at its base at Pearl Harbor on the 7th of December 1941, but what led to that decision? Why did the Japanese attack the USA? – The answer is oil.

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What if Japan had never struck Pearl Harbor? – All About History

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  • Summary: Articles about What if Japan had never struck Pearl Harbor? – All About History Japan’s devastating attack was a stunning surprise assault that resulted in the loss of two US Navy battleships and the deaths of more than …

  • Match the search results: It is without doubt that the bombing of Pearl Harbor was one of the major turning points of World War II. Japan’s devastating attack was a stunning surprise assault that resulted in the loss of two US Navy battleships and the deaths of more than 2,000 people, both military and civilian. The attack l…

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What if pearl Harbour never occured and Japan didn’t attack …

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  • Summary: Articles about What if pearl Harbour never occured and Japan didn’t attack … Without the attack, the war would have been hugely different. Japan could have thrown all naval assets at the British and Dutch in Burma, India, and Indonesia, …

  • Match the search results: Roosevelt was looking but the American people were not. Pearl Harbor and the declaration of war by Germany a few days later gave Roosevelt his opening but if only Pearl Harbor had happened and Germany and not signed the Tripartite Pact with Japan and declared war on us it would have been hard for Ro…

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Events leading to the attack on Pearl Harbor – Wikipedia

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  • Summary: Articles about Events leading to the attack on Pearl Harbor – Wikipedia affairs had reached such a state that the United States would become involved in a war with Japan. … ‘that if the Japanese attacked Thailand, or the Kra …

  • Match the search results: In 1924, General William L. Mitchell produced a 324-page report warning that future wars (including with Japan) would include a new role for aircraft against existing ships and facilities. He even discussed the possibility of an air attack on Pearl Harbor, but his warnings were ignored. Navy Secreta…

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The Great Debate | The National WWII Museum | New Orleans

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  • Summary: Articles about The Great Debate | The National WWII Museum | New Orleans Before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, however, Americans were … United States in the war should be, or if it should even have a role at all.

  • Match the search results: The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, ended the debate over American intervention in both the Pacific and European theaters of World War II. The day after the attack, Congress declared war on Imperial Japan with only a single dissenting vote. Germany and Italy— Japan’s allies—resp…

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Pearl Harbor and the ‘Back Door to War’ Theory

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  • Summary: Articles about Pearl Harbor and the ‘Back Door to War’ Theory U.S. battleship sinking during the Japanese attack of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, … He did not explain that if the country were attacked by one of the Axis …

  • Match the search results: Was there a “back door” to World War II, as some revisionist historians have asserted? According to this view, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, inhibited by the American public’s opposition to direct U.S. involvement in the fighting and determined to save Great Britain from a Nazi victory in Europe,…

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Multi-read content what if japan didnt attack pearl harbor

Japan has never seriously considered the latter scenario – but it may be wise to do so.

On December 15, 1941, Imperial Japanese naval and air units suddenly and deliberately attacked the Dutch fleet at Batavia in the Dutch East Indies (modern-day Indonesia). They destroyed or damaged all five cruisers and eight destroyers, leaving 55-year-old Vice Admiral Conrad Emil Lambert Helfrich with only 20 U-boats and countless but weak torpedo boats to retaliate.

Shortly thereafter, the Japanese 16th Army invaded the Dutch part of the island of Borneo – cautiously bypassing the British-administered parts – and then quickly launched attacks on Java, Sumatra, Sulawesi and other large islands of the East Indian archipelago. The tiny Dutch garrison was quickly overrun, Dutch naval bases at Batavia and Surabaya fell quickly, and by the end of February 1942 Japan secured Dutch resources of petroleum, natural gas, tin, manganese, copper, nickel, bauxite and more coal.

The Japanese government took the first step in attacking the East Indies in July 1941, when it sought and obtained the right from Vichy France to station troops, build airfields and battleship bases in the south. The German invasion of the Soviet Union last month eliminated any threat from that direction and paved the way for an offensive in the south. In contrast, the move south is predicted due to Japan’s desire to secure enough natural resources to be self-sufficient. It is dangerously dependent on the United States for scrap iron, steel, and especially oil: 80% of its gasoline comes from the United States. For years, President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s administration tried to use economic sanctions as a bargaining chip to force Japan to stop invading China. As expected, the move to southern Indochina caused a full freeze of Japanese assets in the United States and a full oil embargo.

The Japanese leadership initially assumed that if they continued their intention to occupy the Dutch East Indies, the inevitable result would be war with both the British Commonwealth and the United States. The plans therefore also include attacks on British bases in Singapore and Hong Kong, US bases in the Philippine archipelago and even the US Pacific Fleet base at Pearl Harbor.

However, close scrutiny of the British and American situations caused the Japanese planners to reconsider. They concluded that the besieged British could not afford to add Japan to their existing adversaries, Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy. Britain, in particular, could not do so without assurances that the United States would enter the war with Japan. And although the Roosevelt administration could deal with threats, American public opinion was so anti-war that the president could not persuade the country to join the war against Nazi Germany, despite the conquest of most of Europe. Indeed, in July 1941, a bill extending the nation’s peace plan—which the Roosevelt administration considered fundamental to U.S. national security—was passed by a unanimous vote.

Therefore, the revised Japanese plan called for an attack on the Dutch East Indies, although much of the Imperial Japanese Navy was held in reserve should Britain or the United States declare war.

The events fully testify to Japanese gambling. British Prime Minister Winston Churchill strengthened Singapore but took a defensive stance in Southeast Asia. After his attempt to advocate Hitler’s war against Germany was thwarted, neither Roosevelt nor his advisers could find any compelling reason to convince the public that the American boys should fight and die because the Japanese overran a little-known colony in Europe.

How logical is this scenario? There is little doubt that the Japanese could quickly defeat the Dutch and capture the East Indies by mid-December 1941, even if (as has happened in the past) the Americans, British and Australians added additional forces with their available warships to defeat the Dutch colony to defend, the Japanese had little trouble conquering the entire archipelago in March 1942.

The harder question to answer is what course Britain and the United States would actually take if Japan ignored its Pacific resources and, of course, refrained from bombing Pearl Harbor.

The British clearly could not sustain such a war without American help. Yes, Britain and the United States have steadily worked towards a common goal against Nazi Germany. The United States Congress passed the Lease Act in March 1941 and American destroyers began escorting convoys from Britain to the mid-Atlantic before delivering them to their rivals. In August, Churchill and Roosevelt held a secret conference in the waters off Newfoundland, a summit that included both military and diplomatic talks. And by the fall of 1941, the United States Navy was engaged in an unpopular but deadly war with German submarines.

However, cooperation in preparing for a conflict with Japan was much less advanced. At the Atlantic Conference, the British presented the Americans with a written proposal to warn Japan, jointly transmitted by Britain, the Netherlands and the United States, stating that if Japan pursues further aggression in Southeast Asia, the three countries in Asia “be forced to take countermeasures, even if these measures could lead to war”. Roosevelt agreed to make such a stern statement – but unilaterally, not jointly – and when the matter arose, the President simply told the Japanese ambassador that in the event of a Japanese attack to the south, he would take steps “to ensure the security of the United… to ensure states. ”

As the crisis with Japan deepened, Roosevelt’s top military advisers told him that while the United States preferred less provocative diplomacy toward Japan, the United States could not stand by and see Japan hit American, British, or Dutch assets and no other Would have choice as to take military action in this case. Roosevelt personally agreed, and on December 1 he told the British ambassador that in the event of a Japanese attack on the Dutch East Indies or British holdings in Southeast Asia, “we should all stick together”. When the ambassador asked for specifics, Roosevelt replied that the British could count on “armed support” from the United States.

However, the President also worries about his capabilities if American assets continue to be ignored by the Japanese. As historian David Reynolds pointed out, “Roosevelt can only propose war; Congress had to explain it. From a purely diplomatic point of view, therefore, Pearl Harbor is a stroke of luck.” Convincing Parliament that an attack on the Dutch East Indies would require only a military response would be difficult; it may have proved impossible.

In the end, the dilemma never arose because the Japanese never considered such an alternative strategy. After the Japanese government decided they had to confiscate the natural resources of the Dutch East Indies, they never seriously considered any plan other than a simultaneous attack on Britain and the United States in the Pacific. The decision was driven solely by operational considerations: Japan’s military planners believed they could not risk letting US air and naval bases in the Philippines reinforce the line, their line of communications with the East Indies. Because of this, they came to the conclusion that the Philippines must also be arrested.

Ironically, by denying such operational risk, they were taking an even greater strategic risk, since the attack on Pearl Harbor was based on the very fragile assumption of an attack: short war with the United States followed by peace negotiations that allowed Japan to defend their territorial interests true. Japan is betting that American public opinion will never believe in a protracted and bloody war in the Pacific and that the combination of the US naval attack on Pearl Harbor and Japan’s construction of a discreet defensive perimeter in the central and south Pacific will convince the US of that would join the mop.

As actual events later showed, it was a bad bet.

Originally published in the September 2007 issue ofWorld War II magazine.To register, clickthis.

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What if Japan had never actually struck Pearl Harbor?

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On the Anniversary of Pearl Harbor, Let us imagine a timeline where the attack on Pearl Harbor never happened. And the Catalyst for American entry into WW2 simply didn’t exist. How would events play out in this alternate timeline? Watch the video to find out one scenario.

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in this alternate reality, what if the on Pearl Harbor never happened? This isn’t that hard to accomplish in all actuality. The decision to Pearl Harbor was something that almost didn’t happen in the first place, The Naval General Staff proved reluctant to go along with the raid and Yamamoto, the commander-in-chief of the navy, was eventually driven to resign to get his way. So either Yamamoto can’t get his way or Emperor Hirohito, who had limited control over his military, finally asserted some command, and refuses it to happen. If the raid on Pearl Harbor doesn’t happen there is still one major obstacle in Japans strike south. The Philippines. The Philippines had been under American control since the Spanish-American of 1898, and while not defended as it could be, the island had a substantial American presence that would be difficult to ignore. Ignoring the islands would mean that the shipping lanes between the oil rich lands in the south and the home islands would be threatened, and a gap would exist in Japans island defense strategy. But for this scenario, let’s say that the Japanese command is willing to run the risk, and hope that the Americans won’t join the until the in the south are completed. While it may seem like a logical idea. This wouldn’t stop the United States from entering, it merely delays the inevitable.

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Japan attacked the U.S Pacific Fleet at its base at Pearl Harbor on the 7th of December 1941, but what led to that decision? Why did the Japanese attack the USA? – The answer is oil.

Japan had been modernising its economy throughout the 20th century and wanted to build an empire of its own. However, Japan lacked the natural resources to make it a reality, with all but 6% of its oil supply being imported. After capturing Manchuria, Japan became bogged down in a full-scale war with China in 1937 and had to look elsewhere for the resources it needed to fight. Meanwhile, the USA was slowly awakening from its isolationism.

When Japan occupied French Indochina in 1941, America retaliated by freezing all Japanese assets in the states, preventing Japan from purchasing oil. Having lost 94% of its oil supply and unwilling to submit to U.S demands, Japan planned to take the oil needed by force. However, striking south into British Malaya and the Dutch East Indies would almost certainly provoke an armed U.S response. To blunt that response, Japan decided to attack the U.S Pacific Fleet at Pearl Harbor, hoping that the U.S would negotiate peace.

The attack at Pearl Harbor was a huge gamble, but one which did not pay off. Though Japan took its objectives in the Pacific and Southeast Asia, the U.S did not respond as expected. Instead of reverting to isolationism, the U.S geared up for total war and Japan’s fate was sealed.

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00:00 Introduction

00:29 Japan’s ambitions

01:29 Second Sino-Japanese War

02:37 American isolationism

04:01 Japan’s oil problem

04:35 Northern vs Southern Strategies

05:54 U.S embargoes

07:10 Japan’s crisis

08:36 The attack on Pearl Harbor

11:12 The attack on Southeast Asia

12:08 U.S response

13:10 Conclusion

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