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POWELL, Adam Clayton, Jr. | US House of Representatives

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  • Summary: Articles about POWELL, Adam Clayton, Jr. | US House of Representatives An unapologetic activist, Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., left his mark on Congress … the future Representative married two more times: Hazel Scott in 1945 and …

  • Match the search results: Soon after his arrival in Washington, Powell challenged the informal regulations forbidding black Representatives from using Capitol facilities reserved for Members. Following the lead of Oscar De Priest, Powell often took black constituents to the whites–only House Restaurant and ordered his s…

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Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Biography – Famous People

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  • Summary: Articles about Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Biography – Famous People Soon after divorcing Hazel in 1960 Powell married Yvette Flores Diago from Puerto Rico. They had a son named Adam Clayton Powell Diago. However, the boy later …

  • Match the search results: children: Adam Clayton Powell III, Adam Clayton Powell IV

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Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. | Great Black Heroes

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  • Summary: Articles about Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. | Great Black Heroes He married Isabel Washington, a star dancer at the Cotton Club, in 1933, and adopted her son Preston. He was deeply committed to the church, its …

  • Match the search results: Powell did not make many friends, especially among the southern Congressmen, but he stood up and addressed issues facing Blacks. One particularly noteworthy incident occurred when he stood on the House floor and chastised Congressman John Rankin of Mississippi. A tradition within the House was that …

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Adam Clayton Powell Jr.

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  • Summary: Articles about Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Adam Clayton Powell Jr. was a politician and activist for the African-American community during the Civil Rights era. He was the pastor of the Abyssinian …

  • Match the search results: Unfortunately, in 1967, the House Democratic Caucus along with Powell’s congressional opponents removed Powell from the committee chairmanship after citing his vacations abroad, “erratic” work style, and “unpredictability” as some of the many reasons. However, Harlem residents sent an impactful mess…

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A Man of Many Roles – The New York Times

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  • Summary: Articles about A Man of Many Roles – The New York Times Adam Clayton Powell Jr. was born Nov. 29, 1908, in New Haven. His mother, Mattie Fletcher Powell, and his father, the Rev. Adam Clayton Powell …

  • Match the search results: Adam Clayton Powell Jr. was born Nov. 29, 1908, in New Haven. His mother, Mattie Fletcher Powell, and his father, the Rev. Adam Clayton Powell Sr., soon moved to New york, where Mr. Powell was made pastor of the Abyssinian Baptist Church. The church was then on 40th Street, between Seventh and Eight…

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The Press: Tabloid Dream – Videos Index on TIME.com

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  • Summary: Articles about The Press: Tabloid Dream – Videos Index on TIME.com Two of Manhattan’s favorite tabloid characters got married last week. The Rev. Adam Clayton Powell Jr., 36, wing-collared pastor of Harlem’s big Abyssinian …

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    Two of Manhattan’s favorite tabloid characters got married last week.
    The Rev. Adam Clayton Powell Jr., 36, wing-collared pastor of Harlem’s
    big Abyssinian Baptist Church and New York’s first Negro Congressman,
    took as a wife (his second) round-eyed, plump Hazel Scott, 25,
    Bach-to-boogie pia…

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Isabell & Adam Clayton Powell Cottage – African-American …

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  • Summary: Articles about Isabell & Adam Clayton Powell Cottage – African-American … Following her marriage, she gave up her show career, and became a supportive wife to Clayton Powell, Jr., who was then a charismatic junior minister at the …

  • Match the search results: The History Project will dedicate the seventeenth site of the Trail on August 24th when a plaque will be unveiled at the Powell house on Dorothy West Avenue in the historic Highlands area of Oak Bluffs. The plaque is to honor the lives of Isabell Washington Powell and the late Congressman Adam Clayt…

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adam clayton powell jr death

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  • Summary: Articles about adam clayton powell jr death Hazel Scott, the pianist and singer who was once married to the late Adam Clayton Powell Jr., died of cancer yesterday at Mount Sinai Medical Center.

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Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. Biography, Life, Interesting Facts

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  • Summary: Articles about Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. Biography, Life, Interesting Facts Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., November 29, An American Politician, Adam Clayton was an all in one kind of person, He materialized as a potential colossus in the …

  • Match the search results: In 1933 Adam Clayton Jr. married Isabel Washington, a singer but they later parted ways in 1945. The same years he married Hazel Scot, a singer with whom he had a son called Adam Clayton Powell III. The marriage ended up in divorce early in 1960. The same year he married Yvette Flores Diago, and the…

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Adam Clayton Powell Jr., Politician born – African …

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  • Summary: Articles about Adam Clayton Powell Jr., Politician born – African … This date marks the 1908 birth of Adam Clayton Powell Jr. He was a Black … In the early 1950s, he and Hazel Scott were married; they divorced in 1956.

  • Match the search results: Born in New Haven, Connecticut, Powell moved to New York City where his father Adam Clayton Powell Sr. ministered at the Abyssinian Baptist Church. After attending public schools, he graduated from Colgate University and received his M. A. in religious education from Columbia University.

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Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. | Who Speaks for the Negro?

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  • Summary: Articles about Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. | Who Speaks for the Negro? Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. (1908-1972) was an African American politician, pastor, and civil rights activist. He was born in New Haven, Connecticut, and received …

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    Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. (1908-1972) was an African American politician, pastor, and civil rights activist. He was born in New Haven, Connecticut, and received a master's degree in religious education from Columbia University. He rose to prominence as a civil rights activist in Harlem in the …

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Adam Clayton Powell Jr., Class of 1930 | Colgate at 200 …

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  • Summary: Articles about Adam Clayton Powell Jr., Class of 1930 | Colgate at 200 … Adam Clayton Powell Jr. as a student at Colgate, circa 1930 … and understanding between blacks and whites and defended interracial marriage.7 As word of …

  • Match the search results: Despite the controversial ending to his political career, his legacy endures, and his contributions are honored today — nationally, in Harlem, and at Colgate. In uptown Manhattan, Seventh Avenue is also called Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Boulevard, and Harlem’s State Office bears his name. Adam Clayton …

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ADAM CLAYTON POWELL JR.: THE USES AND ABUSES OF …

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  • Summary: Articles about ADAM CLAYTON POWELL JR.: THE USES AND ABUSES OF … He and Isabel were married before an overflow audience at Abyssinian Baptist Church on. Page 7. ADAM CLAYTON POWELL J R . 129. March 8, 1933. In later years, …

  • Match the search results: —Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Commencement Address, May 29, 1966 Howard University, Washington, D.C.

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Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. Biography at Black History Now

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  • Summary: Articles about Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. Biography at Black History Now 1908-1972 Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., was New York City’s first black … he married a dancer from the famed Cotton Club, Isabel Washington.

  • Match the search results: 1908-1972  Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., was New York City’s first black congressman. Representing the residents of Harlem in the nation’s capital for two and a half decades as a forceful advocate for African American causes, he rose steadily in power to become one of America’s most influential and effe…

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Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. stands tall as a giantin Harlem’s black community, not only as a pastor of the Abyssinian Baptist Church, but also as a community activist and as the first African American to represent New York in the United States House of Representatives.

Adam Clayton Powell Jr. born in New Haven, Connecticuton November 29, 1908. He was the son of Adam Clayton Powell, Sr., then a Baptist minister in New Haven, and his wife Mattie Buster Shaffer. He has an older sister, Blanche, and the family is of mixed ethnic background; Africans, Europeans and Indians. Powell Sr. graduated from Wayland College, Yale University and Virginia Seminary and was elected pastor of the Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem, the church that eventually grew to more than 10,000 members.

Adam Jr. grew up in a fairly wealthy family due to his father’s success and attended Townsend Harris High School before attending City College of New York and then Colgate University (his father had sent him to Colgate, a Baptist school Adam on track and take him away from the nightlife and nightclubs he frequented). He is a handsome young man and can often be mistaken for Caucasian (at birth his hair is blond) due to his fair skin and hazel eyes, which often allows him to avoid much of his anti-Negro racial conflict. Classmates. This caused them a lot of trouble as he did not distinguish his racial background from his classmates and was even a member of a white fraternity (very awkward, very popular at the time).

His father encouraged him to follow in his footsteps as a pastor. adam jr (Adam) received his bachelor’s degree from Colgate in 1930 and later received his M.A. in religious education from Columbia University a year later. Although he initially intended to work in the medical field, he realized that the Church would offer him a ready-made career. After his ordination, Adam supported his father in the church, both by preaching in the church while expanding his outreach (primarily in charitable endeavors) and replacing his father as pastor and prefect of the church in 1938. He married Isabel. Washington, a star dancer at the Cotton Club, and adopted her son, Preston, in 1933. He is deeply involved in the church, parishioners, and the community around him, and is currently pastor of the largest protest group in the United States.

Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. - Great Black Heroes

He rose to prominence in politics and fought for equal employment and housing opportunities. He became chairman of the Employment Coordination Committee, which pressured local businesses to hire black people at all levels of employment. He led very notable protests, including an “Only Stores Where You Can Work” boycott of all stores along 125, closing most stores, forcing them to hire black workers. During the 1939 World’s Fair, his protesters picked up people outside the fair’s headquarters in the Empire State Building, resulting in a 250 percent increase in black recruitment. Two years later, he led the New York Transit bus boycott, which resulted in 200 additional black jobs. His activism in the community led him to run for New York City Council, and he became the first black man to be elected to the council in 1941.

Three years later he ran for a seat in the United States House of Representatives. He joined a campaign to fight for black civil rights, including seeking a ban on barriers to voting (like poll taxes), equal employment opportunities, and the ban on lynching. Running as a Democrat, he was elected representative of the 22nd congressional district (including Harlem) in 1944 and the first black congressman from New York State. He did not try to quietly pave the way, but dealt head-on with issues affecting his constituency. Since Jim Crow is Southern country law and virtually all Southern congressmen are Separatists, there was no one willing to stand in the House of Representatives and address issues that would affect them. Powell will be the one to do this.

Powell didn’t make many friends, especially among Southern congressmen, but he stood up and addressed the problems facing black people. One particularly notable incident occurred when he stood on the floor of the House of Representatives and caned Mississippi Congressman John Rankin. It is a tradition in the House of Representatives that newcomers to Congress do not speak in the House during their first year. However, when Rankin used the word “nigger” around the house on that occasion, Powell stood up and announced “the time has come to charge Rankin, or at least expel him from the group”. Taking on a powerful congressman like Rankin proved that Powell would be a force to be reckoned with. Powell would have been particularly interested in teasing Rankin. Rankin called Powell’s election to the House of Representatives “a disgrace,” and when Rankin said he didn’t want to sit anywhere near Powell, Adam looked for every possible opportunity to sit near the Mississippi representative. In one, he followed him from seat to seat until Rankin moved five times.

Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. - Great Black Heroes

In 1945, after divorcing Isabel, Powell married Hazel Scott, a jazz singer and pianist. The two have a son named Adam Clayton Powell III. Powell only served the same other black congressman (William Levi Dawson of Illinois) until 1955, and both faced numerous informal hurdles in congressional offices. Powell opposes and refuses to postpone bans on the House Whites Only restaurant, Congress Barbershop, House Gym and other establishments. Britain repeatedly fought segregationists over politics and decency, finding allies in the black community and with organizations like the NAACP to promote equality for black people across America.

One method he uses to achieve his goal is called the Powell Amendment. For any proposed law requiring federal spending, he would introduce an amendment requiring federal funding to be withheld from any jurisdiction that upholds segregation. This affects liberal allies and conservative enemies alike, but is slowly seeping into the minds of politicians as they realize Powell is not going to stop and will not go away. However, some are not yet ready to give up the fight. During the 1955 meeting of the Education and Labor Committee, Powell was beaten up by Congressman Cleveland Bailey of West Virginia, an isolationist who resented Powell’s repeated use of the “Powell Amendment” at the meeting.

His willingness to anger even his allies earned him the party ticket in 1956 and endorsed Republican President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Powell was dissatisfied with the Democratic Platform’s civil rights and asserted that he was not considered a stamp of the Democratic Party. He also sailed against mainstream opinion when he traveled to Indonesia to attend the 1955 Asia-Africa Conference, which celebrated the recent independence of countries like Ghana, Sierra Leone and Indonesia from colonial rule. The State Department asked him not to attend, but he did so as an observer, eventually speaking of the need to end colonialism abroad and division at home, while defending the United States against communist arguments being used against his country. Powell returned home to a warm welcome, who was named “Man of the Year” by the Foreign Veterans Association and invited to speak with President Eisenhower. He suggested that the United States wasted the opportunity to truly compete with the Soviet Union by sending ballet and symphony troupes on world tours. Instead, he thought, the country should focus on introducing current and popular American offerings like jazz, a style of American music that has been attracted to and acceded to by members of the American sect of many different races. Powell suggested sending famous jazz musicians on foreign tours to spread the American art form to attract the attention of young citizens around the world. The State Department agreed and set up such a goodwill tour, which included famous musicians like Dizzy Gillespie. Gillespie dubbed the tour, which many dubbed “Jazz Diplomacy”. The musicians were able to meet high-ranking officials as well as the “common man” and the tour was considered a great success. A man attending a concert in Zagreb, Yugoslavia said: “What this country needs is fewer ambassadors and more press conferences!”

In 1960, after his divorce from Hazel, Adam remarried, this time to Yvette Flores Diago, daughter of the mayor of San Juan, Puerto Rico. They had a son, who he also named Adam Clayton Powell (who later changed his name to Adam Clayton Powell, IV).

Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. - Great Black Heroes

After serving 15 years in the House of Representatives, Powell finally received the role of committee chairman in 1961 when he became chairman of the House Education and Labor Committee. The commission’s stated goal is to “ensure the needs of Americans are met so students and workers can thrive in a changing school system and competitive global economy.” Under his leadership, the committee created federal programs dealing with Medicaid, minimum wage and equal pay for women, and disability education, library support, and training. Much of this legislation was incorporated into President John F. Kennedy’s “New Frontiers” program and President Lyndon Johnson’s “Great Society” and “War on Poverty” programs.

Among his greatest accomplishments was passing legislation protecting the rights of black people, particularly those affected by the Jim Crow laws in the South. He authored bills to criminalize property division, abolish segregation in public schools, and repeal the Southern practice of imposing a ballot tax on black voters. This tax was levied on voters in many Southern states, but a grandfathering clause allowed adult males whose fathers or grandfathers had voted before Emancipation to be exempt from the tax. As a result, white male voters were allowed to vote, while many black voters who could not afford to pay taxes were prevented from participating in the voting process. The Civil Rights Act of 1965 contains many of these provisions and calls for their enforcement.

His growing power made him a target for his political enemies. Unfortunately, in many ways, Powell has made himself an easier target through spending on committee funds, legal troubles, erratic behavior, frequent travel, and frequent absences from home. No doubt many members of the Southern House disliked him simply because of his race and sought every opportunity to punish him. Unfortunately for Powell, while he fought hard against the unfair treatment of members of the House, he also provided them with plenty of ammunition to use against him.

In 1958, Powell was indicted by a federal grand jury for tax evasion. The trial ended with a suspended jury, but the federal government continued to probe his finances. In 1960, Powell gave a television interview in which he accused a Harlem widow named Esther James of being a “pickpocket” for police corruption. James sued him and was awarded $211,500.00. Powell refused to pay damages and instead will not return to his county in Harlem until Sunday if court officials cannot serve it (the award was eventually paid years later). He was found guilty of a criminal offense, but the matter ruined him significantly). In 1967, a House committee suspended Powell’s third wife, Yvette Diago, and accused her of being on the House payroll without doing any work. In fact, Diago admitted that she had moved to Puerto Rico in 1961, but was paid out of Congress Powell’s payroll from that time until January 1967, when the allegations came to light and she was arrested.

Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. - Great Black Heroes

He also travels extensively, with vacations in Florida as well as a vacation home he owns in Bimini, Bahamas. Opponents of the House of Representatives claim he used house money to pay for the trip, including once when he was accompanied by two young women at the expense of the Commonwealth government. That woman was Tamara Wall, an attorney and secretary to Corinne Huff, the first Black Miss Ohio. with whom Powell was involved). As a result, the House of Representatives stripped him of the committee’s leadership in January 1967, and the House of Representatives refused to appoint him until the Judiciary Committee completed its investigation into him. On March 1, 1967, the House of Representatives voted 307 to 116 to remove him from his trial. Powell decided to sue to keep his seat. Although he won the special election to fill his vacant seat (by a score of 7-1), he refused to accept it, preferring to challenge his removal in court. Meanwhile, in November 1968, his Harlem constituents, with overwhelming support, challenged him to be re-elected. House had no choice but to accommodate him now, but did so while contesting his seniority and fined him $25,000. On June 16, 1969, the United States Supreme Court ruled 7-1 in Powell vs. McCormack that the House of Representatives violated his constitutional rights by refusing to vote for him because he was a duly elected member of the House of Representatives congress. Unfortunately, after his Supreme Court victory, he seemed to put salt in his enemies’ faces by showing just 9 calls out of 177, a record for absenteeism. He was the most powerful black politician of his time, but as with many greats, arrogance seems to have become his most destructive opponent.

As for his travel expenses, Powell defended himself by saying, “I will always do exactly what every other congressman and committee chair has done and is doing and will do.” Its constituents have grown weary of their agents, who always seem to have fires to put out, whether in the form of court cases, political infighting, or embarrassing scandals. He was defeated by Charles Rangel in the 1970 Democratic primary by just 150 votes. He attempted to gain election in November as an independent through a signature campaign but failed and resigned from the Abyssinian Baptist Church and returned to his home in Bimini.

In April 1972, Powell’s health began to deteriorate and he had to rush from Bimini to Miami, Florida for hospitalization. He died on April 4, 1972 of acute prostatitis, an inflammation of the prostate. His funeral was held at the Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem and his ashes were scattered over the waters of Bimini by his son Adam III.

Adam Clayton Powell - Great Black Heroes

Many public schools have been named for him over the years, including an office building in Harlem on Seventh Avenue and an area north of Central Park in New York City that has been renamed Adam Clayton, Powell, Jr. Avenue. However, his true legacy was as a confident political figure, as many black people were afraid to speak out against the racism and poverty they had experienced. A shrewd and persuasive leader, he does not shrink from his rivals and leads the fight to change everything in a turbulent society. Most notably, he is credited as the man who opened the door to a few minorities who would follow in his footsteps as politicians in the National Assembly of Non-union Nations.

Father Adam Clayton Powell

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A look back at a nearly forgotten man, the former Harlem Congressman, and Pastor of the oldest Black Protestant church in New York, Adam Clayton Powell, Junior. This segment includes an interview with the former New York City Councilman, and State Assembly member, Adam Clayton Powell, the Fourth, one of his surviving sons who joined us at Sahara TV’s New York studios.

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Adam Powell

Adam Clayon Powell Jr.jpg

Member of the

United States House of Representatives

from New York

In office

January 3, 1945 – January 3, 1971

Preceded by Walter A. Lynch

Succeeded by Charles Rangel

Constituency 22nd district (1945–1953)

16th district (1953–1963)

18th district (1963–1971)

Personal details

Born Adam Clayton Powell Jr.

November 29, 1908

New Haven, Connecticut, U.S.

Died April 4, 1972 (aged 63)

Miami, Florida, U.S.

Political party Democratic

Spouse(s) Isabel Washington (1933–1945)

Hazel Scott (1945–1960)

Yvette Flores Diago (1960–1965)

Children Adam III

Adam IV

1 adopted

Education City University of New York, City College

Colgate University (BA)

Columbia University (MA)

Shaw University (DDiv)

Adam Clayton Powell Jr. (November 29, 1908 – April 4, 1972)[1] was a Baptist pastor and an American politician, who represented the Harlem neighborhood of New York City in the United States House of Representatives from 1945 until 1971. He was the first person of African-American descent to be elected from New York to Congress.[2][3]

Re-elected for nearly three decades, Powell became a powerful national politician of the Democratic Party, and served as a national spokesman on civil rights and social issues. He also urged United States presidents to support emerging nations in Africa and Asia as they gained independence after colonialism.

In 1961, after 16 years in the House, Powell became chairman of the Education and Labor Committee, the most powerful position held by an African American in Congress. As chairman, he supported the passage of important social and civil rights legislation under presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson. Following allegations of corruption, in 1967 Powell was excluded from his seat by Democratic Representatives-elect of the 90th United States Congress, but he was re-elected and regained the seat in the 1969 ruling by the Supreme Court of the United States in Powell v. McCormack. He lost his seat in 1970 to Charles Rangel and retired from electoral politics.

In April 1972, Powell became gravely ill and was flown to a Miami hospital from his home in Bimini. He died there on April 4, 1972, at the age of 63, from acute prostatitis, according to contemporary newspaper accounts. After his funeral at the Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem, his son, Adam III, poured his ashes from a plane over the waters of Bimini.

– wikipedia

A1 Keep The Faith, Baby

A2 My Dear Colleagues

A3 Handwriting On The Wall

B1 Burn, Baby, Burn

B2 Death Of Any Man

B3 One Day

#####

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keywords: #Clayton, #Powell, #explains, #Black, #Power, #1968

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