Best 14 political cartoons from the gilded age

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political cartoons from the gilded age

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Gilded Age Immigration Cartoons – Bill of Rights Institute

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  • Summary: Articles about Gilded Age Immigration Cartoons – Bill of Rights Institute Immigrants arriving during the Gilded Age included large numbers of eastern Europeans and Asians. Cartoons from the period reflect differing perspectives on the …

  • Match the search results: During the Gilded Age, political cartoons were used to dramatically illustrate arguments. This often meant playing up stereotypes in order to score political points. View the cartoons below and evaluate each illustrator’s viewpoints by answering the questions below each image. It may be easiest to …

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Gilded Age Cartoons – Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential …

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  • Summary: Articles about Gilded Age Cartoons – Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential … … and Labor in the Gilded Age Pictorial Press,” Illustrating the Gilded Age: Political Cartoons and the Press in American Politics and Culture, 1877-1901, …

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Political Cartoons of the Gilded Age | New Visions

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  • Summary: Articles about Political Cartoons of the Gilded Age | New Visions Analysis: What can we learn about the Gilded age from analyzing a variety of political cartoons? How do political cartoons help document contemporary, …

  • Match the search results: Students will analyze various political cartoons from the gilded age, learning to use a cartoon analysis protocol that can be applied to any political cartoon or image.  

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Cartoon America > The Ungentlemanly Art: Political Illustrations

  • Author: www.loc.gov

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  • Summary: Articles about Cartoon America > The Ungentlemanly Art: Political Illustrations Art Wood, an award-winning political cartoonist himself, collected more than 16000 … From the nineteenth century’s Gilded Age to recent times, political …

  • Match the search results: Art Wood, an award-winning political
    cartoonist himself, collected more than 16,000 political cartoons by hundreds of the leading creators of the ‘ungentlemanly art,’ a phrase that is commonly used to describe this type of graphic satire. He used the word “illustration” to desc…

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Political Cartoon Gilded Age Teaching Resources | TpT

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  • Summary: Articles about Political Cartoon Gilded Age Teaching Resources | TpT Teaching corruption in the Gilded Age? This activity includes 7 political cartoons depicting Boss Tweed and Tammany Hall.

  • Match the search results: Also included in: Political Cartoons Worksheet BUNDLE

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Gilded Age Cartoon Teaching Resources

  • Author: www.teacherspayteachers.com

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  • Summary: Articles about Gilded Age Cartoon Teaching Resources Allow your students to discover more about THE GILDED AGE using these Primary Source activities using this Political Cartoon: HIS …

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Powerhouse Cartoonists of the Gilded Age – Libraries

  • Author: library.williams.edu

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  • Summary: Articles about Powerhouse Cartoonists of the Gilded Age – Libraries They are especially well-known for their ongoing critique of the political corruption surrounding Tammany Hall. The Chapin Library holds four …

  • Match the search results: The Chapin Library holds four Keppler cartoons, two by Joseph and two by Udo. The earliest of the four, by Joseph, likely comes from the late 1870s, and is a dual critique of advertisement-happy American culture and the sluggish rate at which the Brooklyn Bridge was being constructed. The print&#821…

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The Gilded Age | Journalism in the Digital Age

  • Author: cs.stanford.edu

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  • Summary: Articles about The Gilded Age | Journalism in the Digital Age Newspapers reported the lurid details of the corruption and graft, but it was the political cartoons drawn by Thomas Nast that were permanently etched in the …

  • Match the search results: The Gilded Age was also a period of immense graft and corruption, a theme that would be a mainstay of journalistic reporting throughout the era. The federal bureaucracy became ever more clogged with political appointees in sinecures, expanding the spoils system that was the hallmark of the earlier …

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Gilded Age Cartoons: Artistic Antecedents and Descendants

  • Author: muse.jhu.edu

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  • Summary: Articles about Gilded Age Cartoons: Artistic Antecedents and Descendants However, Gilded Age cartoonists did give “an image starved public”—to borrow Tom Leonard’s term—a new way to visualize political matters and …

  • Match the search results: Images changed the way political commentary was delivered to the public during the Gilded Age, but not all images were equal. Some borrowed extensively from other images; some begat other images themselves. Using examples from known Gilded Age cartoonists—Nast, Gillam, Keppler, and Walker—the articl…

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Joseph Keppler and Gender in Gilded Age Political Cartoons

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  • Summary: Articles about Joseph Keppler and Gender in Gilded Age Political Cartoons … and its specific role in the eyes of political cartoon historian James Fischer. From there, we shall review the political history of the Gilded Age …

  • Match the search results: In order to analyze some of the reasons as to why the presidents were in female garb, potentially an insult, we shall first look at the history of the political cartoon in America, and its specific role in the eyes of political cartoon historian James Fischer. From there, we shall review the politic…

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The Art of the Fat Cat – POLITICO Magazine

  • Author: www.politico.com

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  • Summary: Articles about The Art of the Fat Cat – POLITICO Magazine Down through the Gilded Ages and all the boom-to-bust bubbles, one icon of … One of the titans of the mid-century political cartoon, the Washington Post’s …

  • Match the search results: Joseph Keppler was one of the few cartoonists even more prolific than Nast, and one who perpetually deployed portly plutocrats. This masterpiece from 1889, “The Bosses of the Senate,” helped cement the image of Big Money lobbyists as political heavyweights in the public imagination.

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PONTIN | When Cartoons Aren’t Funny | The Cornell Daily Sun

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  • Summary: Articles about PONTIN | When Cartoons Aren’t Funny | The Cornell Daily Sun Political cartoons were perhaps the most openly accessible form of … I would always wait patiently for the arrival of the Gilded Age.

  • Match the search results: Political cartoons were perhaps the most openly accessible form of sociopolitical commentary in their time, largely abandoning the requirements for highbrow education — or even mere literacy — that newspaper columns and longer form publications demanded of their readers. Sure, Upton Sinclair’s The J…

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Political Cartoons and the Gilded Age | Share My Lesson

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  • Summary: Articles about Political Cartoons and the Gilded Age | Share My Lesson Students will review what a political cartoon is and how they were a major means of news for the poor and middle class.

  • Match the search results: Students will review what a political cartoon is and how they were a major means of news for the poor and middle class. Students will learn about the corruption of urban officials and how it affected the lives of ordinary people. Political Corruption Political Cartoons. Images and meaning.

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Politics As Social History: Political Cartoons in the Gilded Age

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  • Summary: Articles about Politics As Social History: Political Cartoons in the Gilded Age Rebecca Edwards; Politics As Social History: Political Cartoons in the Gilded Age, OAH Magazine of History, Volume 13, Issue 4, 1 June 1999, …

  • Match the search results: Rebecca Edwards, Politics As Social History: Political Cartoons in the Gilded Age, OAH Magazine of History, Volume 13, Issue 4, Summer 1999, Pages 11–15, https://doi.org/10.1093/maghis/13.4.11

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Multi-read content political cartoons from the gilded age

Gilded Age:

From the 1870s through the early 20th century, the United States experienced a period of rapid economic growth. As industrialization spread, a handful of entrepreneurs dominated the American economy. The gap between rich and poor has widened greatly in the country and has become very visible to the general public. Many citizens resent the top 1%, who own most of the nation’s wealth. These business giants also often profitably exploit their workers, leading to many strikes and labor unions. Later, Mark Twain coined this era the “Golden Age” because economic growth appeared on the surface of a glittering jewel, but underneath disparities, conspicuous consumption and greed, corruption lurked (White 2019). Political cartoons have become an important tool to express public anger.

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“Protector of our industry”prepared byBernhard Gillam and edited by Keppler and Schwarzmann in the satirical magazine The Puck. It was published in 1883, six years before the Johnstown flood (Gillam 1883). Cartoons depicting the extreme inequalities that ravaged the Golden Age. In the picture wWealthy businessmen sit on a raft supported by a multitude of workers. Entrepreneurs clung to their money while workers struggled among them. This image captures the public’s frustration at the parasitic dynamic between industrial and labor giants. Employers often exploit their workers and subject them to horrible and often dangerous working conditions when they do not have to experience such conditions themselves. IAfter the Johnstown flood, this powerful dynamic underpinned public anger. What is particularly annoying is that the characters responsible for the catastrophe primarily exploited many of the victims, but suffered no consequences for either crime.

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Bosses of the Senate was created by Joseph Keppler and also published inthe puckon January 23, 1889, less than five months before Johnstown high water. This image was widely disseminated in the media (Keppler 1889). It features big businessmen brazenly defending their corporate interests while hanging out in front of tiny senators. The sign behind the businessman reads, “This is the Senate of Monopolies by monopolies for monopolies.” The businessman had an ovarygreat political influence during the Golden Age. The US legal system is corrupt and essentially useless as dominant industrial interests would undermine any pursuit of justice. Even if entrepreneurs often act unfairly and even illegally, they can often escape the consequences. This corruption became evident after the Johnstown Flood. Despite evidence of their guilt, members of the South Fork Fishing Club used their considerable wealth and influence to evade all liability.

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Using History to Make History: Power to the ((Super Rich and Successful Only)) People

Andrew Carnegie Plays a Double Reel was published inseventh ball1892, three years after the flood. The cartoon shows two opposite sides of Carnegie: the business giant and the philanthropist. Of all the prominent businessmen who emerged during the Golden Age, Andrew Carnegie is perhaps viewed in the most positive light. Committed to the gospel of his wealth, Carnegie has donated most of his fortune to charity and is known for donating to librariesdifferent cities. However, this picture shows that while he is commendable, he is also a ruthless businessman. Its economic brutality was perhaps most evident in the Homestead Strike of 1982, when workers at one of its steel mills went on strike in hopes of improving wages and working conditions. Carnegie hired a private security team to respond to these violent strikes (White 2019). Though perhaps more generous than many, Carnegie was first and foremost a businessman who relentlessly exploited his workers. Carnegie was one of the most prominent members of the South Fork Fishing Club. After the flood, local residents assumed that he, along with many other club members, was responsible for the disaster. Carnegie continued his practice and donated a library to Johnstown as part of a relief effort (PA Inquirer, August 23, 1889). The public’s reaction to his actions is very clear in this cartoon. Johnstown residents are grateful for the library, but that doesn’t excuse the injustices that caused the disaster in the first place.

cartoon

South Fork Dam (Pennsylvania, 1889) | Case Study | ASDSO Lessons Learned

The Republican Monopoly Pleasure Club and Its Dangerous Dam was published inpuckJournal of June 12, 1889 (JAHA 2019). It features members of the South Fork Fishing Club picnicking and enjoying leisurely activities on the dam as a leaking dam floods the town below. While this cartoon chronicles the Johnstown flood more literally than the previous cartoons, it is quite similar to them. Even if the Johnstown Flood hadn’t happened, it wouldn’t be a surprise to find this image in a collection of over-the-top metaphorical cartoons depicting the injustices of the Golden Age. Like the images before it, it shows undisguised outrage at entrepreneurs who face no consequences for their harmful actions. Not only are the club members unconcerned about the terrible tragedy they are causing, but they still enjoy the same lavish lifestyle while the lives of the citizens they exploit are being swept away.

Overview:

Watching this animated series, it becomes clear that the Johnstown disaster is just another dramatic example of the same social and economic dynamics that permeated the Golden Age. The demolition of the South Fork Dam reflects the collapse of industrialists at the end of the 19th century. The Golden Age was followed by the Progressive Era, a period when activists advocated political reform and society to address the problems created by industrialization (White 2019). . The public response to the political and economic corruption resulting from the Johnstown Flood helped propel the United States into a new progressive era that would begin within a decade of the disaster.

Video tutorials about political cartoons from the gilded age

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This first in our new Homework Help Evidence of History series tells the story of William “Boss” Tweed. Tracing his rise to political power in post Civil War New York City, a metropolis whose population was booming from an influx of European immigrants, this video explores the question of whether Tweed was a hero, a villain, or something in between. Examine the evidence and decide for yourself.

Gilded Age and Progressive Era:

-https://billofrightsinstitute.org/curricula/gilded-age-progressive-era

Fabric of History Podcast – Boss Tweed, New York City, and the Political Machine:

-https://billofrightsinstitute.org/podcasts/boss-tweed-new-york-city-and-the-political-machine

Boss Tweed:

-https://billofrightsinstitute.org/essays/william-boss-tweed-and-political-machines

BRIdge from the Past: Thomas Nast Takes on Boss Tweed:

-https://billofrightsinstitute.org/videos/thomas-nast-takes-on-boss-tweed-bridge-from-the-past-art-across-u-s-history

About the Bill of Rights Institute:

Established in September 1999, the Bill of Rights Institute is a 501(c)(3) non-profit educational organization that works to engage, educate, and empower individuals with a passion for the freedom and opportunity that exist in a free society. The Institute develops educational resources and programs for a network of more than 50,000 educators and 70,000 students nationwide.

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Sunday, February 25th at 6pm \u0026 10pm ET on C-SPAN3 – a visit to the National Archives Center for Legislative Archives in Washington, D.C. to look at Clifford Berryman’s popular political cartoons from the early 20th century

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