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Guns, Germs and Steel Summary – What You Will Learn

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  • Summary: Articles about Guns, Germs and Steel Summary – What You Will Learn At the cost of a few society members who die in battle as soldiers, the whole society becomes much more effective at conquering other societies and resisting …

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Guns, Germs, and Steel Summary | GradeSaver

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  • Summary: Articles about Guns, Germs, and Steel Summary | GradeSaver Guns, Germs, and Steel Summary … The book begins with a preface in which Diamond claims that the main purpose of his text is to explain why …

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  • Summary: Articles about Guns, Germs, and Steel Study Guide – eNotes.com Jared Diamond argues that the three major factors that separate the haves from the have-nots in world history are the development of agriculture, the accident …

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  • Summary: Articles about Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies In a boldly ambitious analysis of history’s broad patterns, evolutionary biologist Diamond (The Third Chimpanzee) identifies food production as a key to the …

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‘Guns, Germs and Steel’: Jared Diamond on Geography as …

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Diamond (Jared) Guns Germs and Steel Summary

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Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies

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  • Summary: Articles about Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies Did you ever wonder if there is a certain inevitability in the way world civilization and history has evolved? Jared Diamond’s work Guns, Germs and Steel argues …

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  • Match the search results: Covering societal advances in several areas like writing and religion, Guns, Germs and Steel offers an explanation about how society slowly evolve into its current state. A fascinating and revealing book which provides so much information that you didn’t know about the human kind that will leave yo…

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  • Summary: Articles about Guns, germs, and Steel: the fates of human societies – Jared … Differences within Eurasia. Guns, Germs, and Steel is about differences of human societies between the different continents over the last 11,000 years. Those …

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Summary of Guns, Germs, and Steel: by Jared Diamond

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  • Match the search results: PLEASE NOTE: This is a summary, analysis and review of the book and not the original book. Jared Diamond’s exhaustive tome, Guns, Germs, and Steel delves deep into the differentiating factors affecting humanity around the world since the beginning of recorded history telling the story of why some c…

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Guns, Germs, and Steel PDF Summary – Jared Diamond

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  • Summary: Articles about Guns, Germs, and Steel PDF Summary – Jared Diamond Guns, Germs, and Steel PDF Summary by Jared Diamond examines human societies in the form of a short history of everybody for the last 13000 …

  • Match the search results: The main thesis of Jared Diamond’s transdisciplinary classic “Guns, Germs, and Steel” is that “history followed different courses for different peoples because of differences among peoples’ environments, not because of biological differences among peoples themselves.”

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Multi-read content guns germs and steel summary

The book in three sentences

Some environments offer more starting materials and more favorable conditions for using inventions and building societies than others. This was particularly noticeable in the rise of the European peoples, which was due to environmental differences rather than biological differences in humans themselves. There are 4 main reasons why Europeans came to power and conquered the native peoples of North and South America, and not vice versa: 1) continental differences in plant and animal species available for domestication, resulting in more food and larger populations in Europe and Asia led, 2) the spread of agriculture, technology, and innovation due to the geographic orientation of Europe and Asia (east-west) relative to the Americas (north-south), 3) slight intercontinental spread between Europe and Asia and Africa, and 4) Differences in continent size leading to differences in overall population size and technology penetration.

Summary of Weapons, Germs and Steel

This is a synopsis of my book on Guns, Germs, and Steel by Jared Diamond. My notes are informal and often include quotes from the book as well as my own thoughts. This summary also includes key lessons and important passages from the book.

  • History unfolds differently for different peoples due to differences in their habitats rather than biological differences within them.
  • This book attempts to answer the question, “Why is the pace of progress so different for cultures on different continents?”
  • Around 11,000 years ago, all human societies were hunter-gatherers.
  • Understanding the causes of history improves our ability to intervene and make our world a better place. Many people mistakenly believe that discussing history is just a way of explaining difficult issues. Nothing at all. It improves our ability to trade effectively.
  • The most common interpretation of the different paths taken by Europe compared to Africa, Asia, Oceania, etc. are genetic and biological. It is believed that there are some innate biological differences that made Europeans smarter, more creative, or more resilient. However, science has not provided any solid evidence that this is the main reason for the different results.
  • Interesting side note: Scientists are always competing to uncover the earliest “early human remains” or the earliest XYZ. As a result, there is a new discovery “at the earliest” every few years. Of course, only one can be the earliest.
  • The occupation of Australia was an amazing achievement. This is the first time people use water technology and expand its scope.
  • Humans may have been responsible for the extinction of nearly all of Australia’s large mammals. The same is true of the many large mammals that populated the Americas more than 10,000 years ago.
  • The environment of ancient Polynesian society greatly influenced the way of life and behavior. Many islands have different landscapes and climate zones. Whether cultures developed weapons and became adept at war, whether they became hunter-gatherers or farmers, whether they acted more tribal or hierarchically is largely determined by the environment in which these people live.
  • Food and animal domestication arose independently in five different regions of the world (at different times) and possibly in four other regions, although there is still some controversy about these regions. .
  • We often think that there is a sharp divide between farming and hunter-gatherer lifestyles, but there can actually be a mix of both. For example, some cultures grow crops, continue a hunter-gatherer lifestyle as they grow, and then return to harvesting and eating.
  • Farming has not resulted in a significantly better lifestyle. In fact, life tends to be worse for those who actually farm than for hunter-gatherers. If this is true, and the evidence seems to indicate it, then it means that the progress of civilization has essentially taken place behind the scenes of non-society. In other words, the whole system we live in – agriculture, capitalism, etc. – requires inequality to work.
  • Farming allows for an increase in food production per unit area, meaning that a given area can support a larger population. This allowed agrarian cultures to defeat hunter-gatherer cultures by sheer force due to their larger populations. This led to the spread of more agrarian societies around the world.
  • During the Industrial Revolution in Britain, dark moths became more likely to survive as their surroundings became dirtier and covered in soot, smoke and debris. Therefore, dark moths are more likely to survive than light moths. As the environment changed, so did the moth’s evolution. A fascinating example of evolution on a small scale.
  • Grains alone make up more than half of the food consumed by modern humans.
  • The increase in domestic food production in some areas is the result of a number of factors. First, in certain areas there are plants that are more suitable for domestication. This results in people arriving earlier in the country than in these regions. Second, because of this early start, these people eventually domesticated more difficult crops to grow. The evidence seems to indicate that all humans have the ability to produce food, and even modern hunter-gatherers appear to move in this way by nature.
  • The rise of agriculture in some areas before others has to do with the environment, not people’s intelligence.
  • The Anna Karenina Principle: In many areas of life, success is not about doing something right, but about avoiding the many mistakes that can be made.
  • Domestic animals differ from their wild ancestors in many ways. For example, many domesticated animals vary in size and have smaller brains than their wild ancestors.
  • The domestication of large mammals ended about 4,500 years ago. This shows that humans have tried to domesticate them all and there are no longer suitable species. This is further evidence that the type of animals available determines domestication in certain regions, not the people who live in the area. The spread of this agriculture was in turn influenced by the environment.
  • There is an inefficiency in the food process. The nutrient transfer is well below 100 percent and is usually around 10 percent. For example, it takes 10,000 pounds of corn to make a 1,000 pound bull.
  • The main geographic axis of North and South America is North-South. That is, the landmass is longer. The same applies to Africa. But for Europe and Asia, the main axis is east-west. Interestingly, this location and shape makes a lot of sense, as it appears that agriculture and innovation spread faster along the east-west axis than north-south.
  • Places along the same east-west axis share the same latitude and therefore have similar day lengths, seasons, climates, precipitation, and biomes. All of this increases the rate of innovation relative to the north-south axis.
  • All tropical rainforests are within 10 degrees of latitude of the equator.
  • A body of evidence for variation in distribution along geographic axes is the distribution of domesticated crops. Many crops spread across Asia with a single domestication, while crops such as cotton or squash were domesticated in many separate areas throughout Mesoamerica. This is because the crop is spreading too slowly for a domesticated species to take over the area.
  • It is important to realize that while Diamond discusses time frames that are hundreds or thousands of years long, the core idea can be applied to short periods of individual behavior as well. In fact, large long-term differences only occur because short-term differences repeat themselves over and over again. Small environmental differences have resulted in small changes in the behavior of individuals, resulting in significant differences when repeated over thousands of years.
  • One reason farming communities have developed immunity to diseases that have wiped out hunter-gatherer populations is that some diseases (like measles) are “common diseases.” They need a large population to sustain themselves because they act quickly: they can either die or develop immunity. In order for the disease to go away on its own, there must be enough newborns to catch the disease from those who have developed immunity. Only peasant communities could reach the necessary population size.
  • On average, farming sustains populations 10 to 100 times larger than hunting and gathering.
  • North America had about 20 million Native Americans when Columbus landed in 1492. Within two centuries, 95% of the native people had died, mostly from infectious diseases.
  • The writing system is historically considered to be the determining factor in whether an ancient civilization is considered advanced. This can be argued. The Incas built a great civilization without writing.
  • All alphabets in the modern world have evolved from an original alphabet, either in idea form or actual writing, developed in the Middle East.
  • Writing developed independently in some regions, but spread through the spread of ideas in most cultures and places.
  • Most inventions are not born out of necessity, but out of tinkering and curiosity.
  • Technology develops more cumulatively than in isolated exploits. Even people we often associate with acts of genius, like the Wright brothers and Thomas Edison, were actually built on the work of their ancestors and had able followers and progressive ideas.
  • Technology finds most of its uses after it is invented, rather than being invented to meet a foreseeable need. The phrase “necessity is the mother of invention” is generally wrong. (Though some examples, such as the Manhattan Project, still exist.)
  • Longevity is one reason technology can grow and spread faster in some places than others. The longer lifespan increases the surface area you have to experiment with ideas and allows you to take on longer projects that you would otherwise avoid with limited time.
  • Geographical location is a crucial factor in the rate of innovation and technology acceleration, since a centrally located society accumulates knowledge and technology not only from its own inventions, but also from neighboring societies. In the case of a particularly large landmass like Eurasia, technologies can spread from one culture to another and so on across the continent. This spread was much faster in these places than in the Aboriginal cultures of Tasmania, which had no external contact with other civilizations for more than 10,000 years.
  • Government and religion are two of the main reasons some societies overtake others. These shared myths led to collaboration and increased power.
  • There are four levels of organization in society: Gang (5-80 people), Tribe (100-1000 people), Kingdom (1000 to tens of thousands people), and State (50,000 people or more).
  • Humanity has been on a clear path from small groups to larger groups culminating in nations over the past few thousand years.
  • Population size in an area is a strong indicator of social complexity.
  • Culture is heavily dependent on population density. The higher the population, the more the culture seems to multiply and spread.
  • War or threat of war has been an important factor in uniting human societies throughout history. This is how cultures merge.
  • Five Dog Night is an Australian term for a very cold night as you have to use five dogs as a blanket.
  • Isolation is an important factor preventing the spread of creativity and innovation as most people and societies get their ideas from outside society. Therefore, constant connection with others and sharing of ideas and resources is essential for technological and creative advancement.
  • Food production is an important component in determining the strength of a society. People of the same lineage inhabited New Guinea and Indonesia, but Indonesians remained hunter-gatherers while New Guineans developed agriculture. When the Austronesians invaded the area, the Indonesians came under their control, but the New Guineans (with their food, antimicrobials, and technology) were able to resist.
  • Once again, the environment determines the distribution of power across the islands of East Asia and the Pacific. Depending on their location, the islanders vary in their relationships with other peoples and in the plant and animal species available to them for domestication. People with favorable positions for food production and access to technology have replaced those with less favorable environments.
  • The end of Chapter 18 contains many interesting examples of peoples who were largely genetically similar because of similar ancestors, but developed very different societies and technologies because of their own environments.
  • Example of Cultural Evolution: The New Zealand Moari were able to identify the most useful rocks and animals for domestication within a century of their arrival.
  • The striking differences in the history of peoples on different continents are not due to differences between peoples, but rather to differences in their habitats.
  • There are four main reasons why Europeans rose to power and conquered the native peoples of North and South America, not the other way around.
  • Reason 1: Continental differences in plants and animals available for domestication. The difference is huge. Europe and Asia have the best prospects, then Africa, then America, then Australia. Improved agricultural aspects led to larger populations and larger armies in Europe and Asia.
  • Reason 2: the diffusion rate of technological innovations due to the orientation of continents (east-west versus north-south) and geographic barriers (mountains, deserts, etc.). The favorable geography of the European and Asian country led to a much faster expansion of agriculture and technology.
  • Reason 3: slight intercontinental spread. Ideas, technologies and innovations can easily spread between Europe, Asia and Africa. However, it is difficult to spread to the Americas because the vast oceans and landmass, located in cold climates and at high latitudes, are not suitable for cultivation.
  • Reason 4: the continents’ difference in total population size. Europe and Asia is a vast country where competition is common and widespread.
  • All human societies contain creative people. It’s just that some environments offer more source materials and more favorable conditions for using inventions than others.
  • The division of Europe was key to Columbus’ crossing of the Atlantic. He was rejected by four different kingdoms before eventually convincing the King and Queen of Spain to fund his voyage. Meanwhile, Chona had the technology to explore the world by ship, but her dictator at the time was reluctant to do so. In this way, one person has prevented the whole human being (with technology) from being successful. A little fragmentation is fine. Too much centralized power means one person can capture the creativity of many.
  • In the 1960s and 1970s, decisions by several Chinese leaders resulted in schools in the country being closed for five years. As crazy as it is, centralized power still plays a big part.
  • Europe has always been much more fragmented than China. Even at its peak, the Roman Empire never controlled more than half of Europe.
  • Understanding ultimate cause is essential to understanding human behavior.
  • Predicting history is much easier over long periods of time, but fundamentally impossible over short periods of time.
  • Great discussion of science in the last half of the epilogue.
  • Careful observation of natural experiments (things that happen in the real world) can lead to fascinating and useful insights.
  • Epidemiology, ecology, and evolutionary biology are developing better methods to deal with confounding factors that often occur in natural experiments.

read suggestions

This is a list of authors, books, and concepts covered in Guns, Germs, and Steel that may be helpful for future reading.

  • Toynbee’s 12 volume history series
  • Movie: The gods must be crazy
  • New Zealand Maori War with muskets
  • Applications of Chaos Theory. The QWERTY keyboard versus the Dvorak keyboard is an example.

Additional Thoughts

Here is a list of interesting notes, side stories, or additional thoughts that caught my eye while reading the book.

  • Many of the large mammals used for food production were not domesticated in the Americas because around 13,000 B.C. became extinct (due to the arrival of humans?). This happened before agriculture reached America, so domesticating these animals never occurred to prehistoric hunter-gatherers. But why?

Jared Diamond’s guns, germs and steel

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This video was recorded for EFL students in a CLIL class using Jared Diamond’s classic work, “Guns, Germs, and Steel”. It is used as part of an in-class listening gap activity for review, and because it is for non-native English learners, please adjust as necessary.

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GradeSaver “Guns, Germs, and Steel Part 1: From Eden to Cajamarca Summary and Analysis”. GradeSaver, 14 August 2018. Web. 14 August 2018.

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A summary of Jared Diamond’s important arguments in Guns, Germs and Steel about why growth began where it did thousands of years ago.

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This video was recorded for EFL students in a CLIL class using Jared Diamond’s classic work, “Guns, Germs, and Steel”. It is used as part of an in-class listening gap activity for review, and because it is for non-native English learners, the pace is slower than normal. Adjust as necessary!

Adapted from original transcript:

GradeSaver “Guns, Germs, and Steel Part 2: The Rise and Spread of Food Production Summary and Analysis”. GradeSaver, 14 January 2019. Web. 14 January 2019.

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This video was recorded for EFL students in a CLIL class using Jared Diamond’s classic work, “Guns, Germs, and Steel”. It is used as part of an in-class listening gap activity for review, and because it is for non-native English learners, the pace is slower than normal. Adjust as necessary!

Adapted from original transcript:

GradeSaver “Guns, Germs, and Steel Part 3: From Food to Guns, Germs, and Steel Summary and Analysis”. GradeSaver, 14 January 2019. Web. 14 January 2019.

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