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New Deal Programs

  • Author: livingnewdeal.org

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  • Summary: Articles about New Deal Programs The list of programs is as complete as you will find anywhere. For each New Deal program, there is a summary of the law, agency, goals and achievements, …

  • Match the search results: The Living New Deal online map is making the legacy of New Deal public works and artworks visible to the public. We have crowdsourced thousands of sites, but that’s just the tip of the iceberg.  Now, the free Living New Deal app for iPhones makes the job of documenting New D…

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New Deal – Programs, Social Security & FDR – HISTORY

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  • Summary: Articles about New Deal – Programs, Social Security & FDR – HISTORY The New Deal was a series of programs and projects instituted during the Great Depression by President Franklin D. Roosevelt that aimed to …

  • Match the search results: The New Deal was a series of programs and projects instituted during the Great Depression by President Franklin D. Roosevelt that aimed to restore prosperity to Americans. When Roosevelt took office in 1933, he acted swiftly to stabilize the economy and provide jobs and relief to those who were suff…

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New Deal – Wikipedia

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  • Summary: Articles about New Deal – Wikipedia The New Deal was a series of programs, public work projects, financial reforms, and regulations enacted by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in the United …

  • Match the search results: The New Deal policies drew from many different ideas proposed earlier in the 20th century. Assistant Attorney General Thurman Arnold led efforts that hearkened back to an anti-monopoly tradition rooted in American politics by figures such as Andrew Jackson and Thomas Jefferson. Supreme Court Justice…

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The Hundred Days and Beyond: What Did the New Deal …

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  • Summary: Articles about The Hundred Days and Beyond: What Did the New Deal … The Hundred Days and Beyond: What Did the New Deal Accomplish? Franklin D. Roosevelt to Henry T. Rainey, June 10, 1933. (. There wasn …

  • Match the search results: It was these measures above all that created a half-way political revolution in the United States and bound lower-income voters to the Democratic Party until at least the 1980s and made it the national majority party until the 1990s. But it was only a half-way revolution. FDR never created the unequ…

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New Deal | Definition, History, Programs, Summary, & Facts

  • Author: www.britannica.com

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  • Summary: Articles about New Deal | Definition, History, Programs, Summary, & Facts New Deal, domestic program of the administration of U.S. Pres. Franklin D. Roosevelt (FDR) between 1933 and 1939, which took action to bring …

  • Match the search results: New Deal, domestic program of the administration of U.S. Pres. Franklin D. Roosevelt (FDR) between 1933 and 1939, which took action to bring about immediate economic relief as well as reforms in industry, agriculture, finance, waterpower, labour, and housing, vastly increasing the scope of the fede…

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New Deal History – The State Museum of Pennsylvania

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  • Summary: Articles about New Deal History – The State Museum of Pennsylvania Shortly after taking office, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt launched the New Deal, a comprehensive social and economic recovery program designed to …

  • Match the search results: Because the Great Depression wielded such a heavy blow on Pennsylvania–by the mid-1930s, more than 37 percent of its workers were unemployed–both FDR’s New Deal and Governor Earle’s Little New Deal worked in tandem to not only create jobs but to build enduring projects which still serve citizens t…

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The Great Depression and the New Deal | National Archives

  • Author: www.archives.gov

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  • Summary: Articles about The Great Depression and the New Deal | National Archives President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “New Deal” aimed at promoting economic recovery and putting … and create a vast public works program for the unemployed.

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    Many New Deal-era government agencies sponsored photography projects. Additionally, many agencies were tasked with verbally and photographically documenting projects they undertook. For the most part, these projects used a “documentary” approach that emphasized straightforward scenes of everyday …

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49b. Putting People Back to Work – USHistory.org

  • Author: www.ushistory.org

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  • Summary: Articles about 49b. Putting People Back to Work – USHistory.org Of the many programs instituted by the New Deal, the Civilian Conservation Corps … Americans of all skill levels were given jobs to match their talents.

  • Match the search results: The first major help to large numbers of jobless Americans was the Federal Emergency Relief Act. This law gave $3 billion to state and local governments for direct relief payments. Under the direction of Harry Hopkins, FERA assisted millions of Americans in need. While Hopkins and Roosevelt believed…

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Franklin Roosevelt and Equal Educational Opportunity – JSTOR

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  • Summary: Articles about Franklin Roosevelt and Equal Educational Opportunity – JSTOR federal involvement in their internal affairs. Ironically, the great educational programs of the New Deal failed to accomplish Roos- evelt’s dual aim.

  • Match the search results: The University of North Carolina Press is the oldest university press in the South and one of the oldest in the country. Founded in 1922, the Press is the creation of that same distinguished group of educators and civic leaders who were instrumental in transforming the University of North Carolina f…

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The real lesson of the New Deal: Biden can’t make unforced …

  • Author: www.washingtonpost.com

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  • Summary: Articles about The real lesson of the New Deal: Biden can’t make unforced … State and local governments provided matching funds to receive federal grants and loans, so their tax dollars supported Roosevelt’s programs, as …

  • Match the search results: But the New Deal didn’t just construct basic physical infrastructure. Roosevelt and his aides believed in socially useful infrastructure that invested in the future. This vision meant that building new schools in almost half of the nation’s counties joined the list of New Deal projects.

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The Great Depression Lesson 4 – Econ Lowdown

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  • Summary: Articles about The Great Depression Lesson 4 – Econ Lowdown You will classify New Deal programs as relief, reform or recovery and analyze the effects of these programs on the unemployment rate, government spending, Gross …

  • Match the search results: In this lesson you will examine statistical data related to the Great Depression, identify problems and offer solutions. You will reflect on the course of actions taken by then-President Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) and focus on New Deal Programs. You will classify New Deal programs as relief, re…

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New Deal in Virginia

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  • Summary: Articles about New Deal in Virginia Other New Deal work-relief programs included the Public Works … Since it required no matching state funds, Virginia’s political leaders could not obstruct …

  • Match the search results: The obstructions of the Byrd Organization, however, and the shortcomings of the New Deal programs limited their effectiveness in the state. The miserliness of state leaders left many citizens without adequate relief. Virginia agriculture, with its many subsistence farms, was not well-suited for the …

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The New Deal: Reputation and Reality – Hillsdale College

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  • Summary: Articles about The New Deal: Reputation and Reality – Hillsdale College While the WPA was a federal program, states and localities were expected to contribute to WPA projects, but no explicit matching formula was ever adopted. The …

  • Match the search results: An analysis of individual New Deal programs or combinations of New Deal programs that targeted a particular segment of the economy all yields the same result. Political variables by themselves generally explain more of the cross-state variation in New Deal expenditures that do variables measuring a …

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New Deal Cultural Programs

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  • Summary: Articles about New Deal Cultural Programs The Works Progress Administration (WPA) … Though the New Deal failed to accomplish the fundamental structural changes FDR’s words suggest, his administration …

  • Match the search results: Many excellent resources are available on the New Deal cultural projects, including the following: Hallie Flanagan, Arena (New York: Duell, Sloan & Pearce, 1940); Jerre Mangione, The Dream and the Deal: The Federal Writers' Project, 1935-1943 (New York: Avon, 1972); Richard D. McKinzie, The New…

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Encyclopedia of the Great Plains | NEW DEAL

  • Author: plainshumanities.unl.edu

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  • Summary: Articles about Encyclopedia of the Great Plains | NEW DEAL The benefits to the Plains from the New Deal work relief programs were mixed. The region lacked the skilled labor and financial resources for matching funds …

  • Match the search results: Long-standing rural fears about the threat
    of centralized power were raised by Roosevelt’s
    Court-packing and executive branch reorganization
    plans and were reinforced by the
    intrusion of federal bureaucrats into the daily
    lives of Plains men and women. The New
    Deal’s growing exploitation of class wa…

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Social Welfare History Project New Deal – Virginia …

  • Author: socialwelfare.library.vcu.edu

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  • Summary: Articles about Social Welfare History Project New Deal – Virginia … The term “New Deal” was coined during Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s … Civilian Conservation Corps Accomplishments: 1939″My Hopes for the …

  • Match the search results: The term “New Deal” was coined during Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s 1932 Democratic presidential nomination acceptance speech, when he said, “I pledge you, I pledge myself, to a new deal for the American people.” Roosevelt summarized the New Deal as a “…use of the authority of government as an organiz…

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Multi-read content match the new deal program to what it accomplished.

The new agreement is a combination of dozens of programs and agencies created by the Roosevelt administration and Congress.

Some are born by law, some are born by executive order; some are known, others not; some names were changed or modified during the course; some last only a few years, some last. It can be confusing, and we hope this list helps sort things out. The list of programs is as complete as you will find anywhere.

For each New Deal program, there is a summary of the law, agency, goals and achievements, and key players and legacies. These are mainly based on primary (cited) sources and are as accurate as possible.

—Click on the program name and a pop-up text will appear. — Click here to see all new offers in alphabetical order
—See the New Deal Progress page for the chronological order of the programs.

economic stimulus

Reconstruction Finance Society (1932)
Created during the Hoover administration, enhanced by FDR.
Financial support for public, industrial and defense activities.

National Industrial Recovery Act (1933)
Establishment of the National Recovery Agency (NRA).
Legalized industry cooperation for price control and collective bargaining over work.

Agricultural Adjustment Act (1933, reapproved 1938)
The Agricultural Adjustment Administration was established (AAA).
Measures have been introduced to reduce crop supply, stabilize prices and support farmers’ incomes.

The Electric Household and Agricultural Administration (1934)
Americans helped buy electrical appliances; Cooperation with TVA and the Rural Electrification Authority.

Income and Wealth Tax (1934-1941)
Greater emphasis on progressive taxation and wealth taxation; A constant increase in sales is achieved.

Federal Credit Union (1934)
Provides Americans with co-operative credit and savings and an alternative to usury.

United States Tourism Administration (1937)
Help increase leisure travel

bank stabilization

The Emergency Bank Relief Act (1933)
Granted the President emergency powers over the US banking system, which he described as a “bank holiday,” to allow for a review of all banks and the closure of failing banks.

The Glass-Steagall Banking Act (1933)
The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation was formed to insure individual bank accounts
Trading is separated from investment banking – “firewall”.

Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) (1933)
Bank deposits are insured to a certain extent against bank failures.

Federal Credit Union (1934)
Provides Americans with co-operative credit and savings and an alternative to usury.

Securities Act (1933)
The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is formed.
Permitted state regulation of stock trading in public companies.

Gold Reserve Act (1934)
Called with all private gold and built a government treasury (Fort Knox).

Bankruptcy Reform (1934-1938)
Businesses are protected from creditor claims; supporting cities and communities in need; corporate bankruptcy reform; created more individual insolvency opportunities.

Banking Act (1935)
Restructuring and centralization of the Federal Reserve Bank.

Public Utilities Act (1935)
Consumers are protected from certain rate hikes and also from risky speculative transactions.

relief

Federal Emergency Aid Act (1933)
CreatedFederal Agency for Disaster Management (FERA).
Provides financial assistance to the states to support local relief programs for those in need.

Federal Surplus Commodities Corporation (FSCC) (1933)-renamed Federal Residual Relief Corporation (1933-1935), then Federal Surplus Commodity Corporation (1935-1940).
Distribute surplus food and goods to those in need.

Railroad Retirement Board (1934)
Administer the Railroad Retirement Program and many other railroad employee benefits programs.

Emergency Relief Act (1935-1943)
In particular, provide funds for agents working on the New DealProject Progress Management (WPA).

Social Security Act (1935)
Established a national system for pensions, unemployment insurance and mother-of-child support and set up the Social Security Administration (SSA) to administer the system.

Public works – New program

Civil Conservation Corps (CCC) (1933)
Created under the Emergency Conservation Act.
Bring unemployed, unskilled youth to work in park and rural renovation.

Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) (1933)
Incorporated under the Tennessee Valley Jurisdiction Act.
River basin development planning is based on dams and hydropower.

Administration of Public Works (PWA) (1933)
Created under the National Industrial Recovery Act.
Private contractors are paid to build major projects proposed by the states.

Civil Engineering (CWA) (1933)
Created by Executive Order as a temporary work facilitation measure under FERA.
Directly recruit unemployed people to work on local projects; became the model for WPA.

Federal Agency for Emergency Management (FERA) (1933)
Created under the Federal Emergency Relief Act to give states grants for work programs to hire the unemployed and directly assist the poor.

Project Progress Management (WPA) (1935)-renamed Work Project Management (1939)
Created by the Executive Order for the Funding of State and Local Public Works Projects.
Employed unemployed directly and became the largest of any public program.

National Youth Administration (NYA) (1935)
Created by Executive Order as part of WPA.
Hiring young men and women in and out of school for work programs.

Rural Electrification Administration (REA) (1935)
Created by Executive Order to provide electricity to isolated rural areas.
Permanently manufactured byRural Electrification Act (1936).

Soil Protection Service (SCS) (1935)
Created byThe Land Protection Act (1935)to continue the work of the Soil Erosion Service (SES) created under the Conservation Emergency Act (1933).

Public Works – Extension of existing programs

Public Roads Bureau (BPR) (1918)-renamed Public Roads Administration (1939)
Roads built in national parks

United States Postal Service (1792)
Working with the US Treasury Department, and thenPublic Building Management (PGA)to create new post office buildings and post office artworks.

Bureau of Complaints (1902)
Construction of dams and irrigation projects in western states and major watersheds in Columbia, Colorado

Corps of Engineers (1802)
Build levees, dams and canals across the country, construct the Missouri River Basin project and improve levees along the Mississippi, Ohio and Sacramento rivers.

Quarter Corps (1775)
Responsible for the transportation of supplies, food and support services for the US military. As part of the New Deal, the Quartermaster Corps received significant funding from both the Public Works Administration (PWA) and emergency relief funds.

United States Armed Forces and National Defense Industry
Upgrade military base, fund navy

art

Artwork Project (PWAP) (1933)
Paid for by the CWA and operated by the US Treasury Department.

art
Plays, concerts and works of art.

Treasury Department of Fine Arts (TSFA) (1934)- was originally called Treasury Division of Painting and Sculpture (TSPS) from 1934 to 1938, then Division of Fine Arts (TSFA) from 1938 to 1939 and finally only Division of Fine Arts (SFA), located in the newly created Public Administration Building, 1939 until 1943.
The assembled artworks were created to enhance public buildings, particularly the post office.

The Art of Treasury Relief Project (TRAP) (1935)
The smallest of the programs that hires unemployed artists to create public works of art.

Indian Crafts Panel (1935)
Created to promote and protect Indian handicrafts.

Federal One Project (1935)
Created by WPA to recruit artists, writers, historians and other professionals
The largest art program with five departments:

-Federal Art Project (FAP) (1935)
-Federal Music Project (FMP) (1935)
-Federal Writers Project (FWP) (1935)
-Federal Theater Project (FTP) (1935)
-Historical Records Survey (HRS) (1935)

A reorganization in 1939 changed the names of the first three programs to the WPA Arts Program, WPA Music Program, and WPA Writers Program, eliminated the theater project, and made HRS part of the WPA Research and Profile Program.

Federal Dance Project (1936)
An offshoot of the federal theater project created to provide exceptional opportunities for unemployed dancers.

National Administrative Youth Dance Troupe (1936)
A small performing arts department in the NYA.

preserve history

National Archives and Records Administration (1934)
The National Archives of the United States of America for historical documents, photographs, and other records.

Historic Places Act (1935)
Make the preservation of historic sites the responsibility of the National Parks Service, and empower the agency to survey, select, and preserve structures and sites of national importance.

Historical Records Survey (HRS) (1935)
Make an inventory of federal, state, and local records; Results of work used today by historians, researchers and genealogists.

Reorganization of public work programs

United States Department of the Treasury, Public Buildings Branch (PBB) (1933)-called Public Works Branch from 1933 to 1935, then Public Works Branch from 1935 to 1939
Part of the newly formed procurement department to consolidate federal construction operations.
Manage the construction and repair of most federal buildings.
Managed Treasury Division of the image

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) (1937)
Created by Bonneville Power Act.
Managed network and income from the Columbia River project.

Public Buildings Administration (PBA) (1939)
Established under the Reorganization Act of 1939 to administer all federal (non-military) buildings and to undertake the work of the United States Department of Procurement.

Federal Agency (BWA) (1939)
Founded after the Reorganization Act of 1939 as an umbrella organization for
manages existing public works programs including PWA, WPA, USHA, PRA (BPR) and PBA.

Federal Security Service (FSA) (1939)
Created under the Reorganization Act of 1939 to administer certain federal agencies

landscape

Agricultural Adjustment Act (1933, reapproved 1938)
Establishment of the Agricultural Adjustment Administration (AAA) to stabilize prices and prop up incomes through government purchases, marketing boards, and land funds.

Farm Credit Act (1933)
The Farm Credit Authority is formed (FCA).
Monitor all farm loan programs

Electrical Household and Court Management (1934)
Americans helped buy electrical appliances; Cooperation with TVA and the Rural Electrification Authority.

Bankruptcy Reform (1934-1938)
Businesses are protected from creditor claims; supporting cities and communities in need; corporate bankruptcy reform; created more individual insolvency opportunities.

Virgin Islands Company (1934)
revitalizing the Virgin Islands’ sugar and rum industries; lowering the unemployment rate; provision of various agricultural services and loan schemes; in cooperation with a homesteading program.

The Shelterbelt Project (1934)
A major tree planting project on the Great Plains to protect against wind erosion and create jobs for the unemployed.

Resettlement Administration (RA) (1935)
Developed from previous Emergency Relief Acts.
Create planned communities for Americans whose livelihoods have been devastated by the recession; reclamation of overexploited land; loans to farmers.

The Land Protection Act (1935)
Formation of the Conservation Society Service (SCS) to support the construction of soil protection and water protection structures following the success of the Emergency Soil Erosion Service (SES).

Rural Electrification Act (1936)
Preceded by Executive Order establishing the Rural Electrification Administration (REA) (1935); brought grid power to remote rural areas.

Bankhead-Jones Farm Tenants Act (1937)
Offer help to tenants and growers.

housing benefit

Homeowner Loan Act (1933)
Founded a home equity loan company (HOLC).
Provides financial assistance to homeowners and the mortgage industry.

Housing Office in the Alley (1934)
Housing improvements for low-income residents of Washington, DC.

National Housing Act (1934)
Formation of the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) to secure mortgages from banks
Creating Federal Savings

United States Housing Act (1937)
Formation of the United States Housing Authority (USHA) to build public housing.

Employment Law

National Industrial Recovery Act (1933)
Ensure workers’ right to organize, set a national minimum wage and ban child labor.

Wagner-Peyser Act/US Labor Administration (1933)
Was abolished and subsequently reorganized the United States Employment Service (USES) into a more efficient agency; USES has helped reintegrate the unemployed into the labor market.

Railroad Retirement Board (1934)
Administer the Railroad Retirement Program and many other railroad employee benefits programs.

National Industrial Relations Act (Wagner Act) (1935)
Reaffirming the right to collective bargaining with the rules and enforcement of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB).

Social Security Act (1935)
Provision of unemployment insurance and social security taxes on payroll and wages.

Fair Labor Standards Act (1938)
The right to recovery expires ifNational Industrial Recovery Lawwas overturned by the Supreme Court: minimum wage and no child labor.

health

National Cancer Institute Act (1937)
Foundation of the National Cancer Institute within the National Institutes of Health.

Food, Drug and Cosmetics Act (1938)
Improving public safety for consumers.

country

Civil Conservation Corps (CCC) (1933)
Created under the Emergency Conservation Act.
Bring unemployed, unskilled youth to work in park and rural renovation.

Reorganization of federal parks (1933)
Transfer of all National Park Service national monuments and battlefields by executive order, as well as federal buildings in Washington D.C.

The Shelterbelt Project (1934)
A major tree planting project on the Great Plains to protect against wind erosion and create jobs for the unemployed.

Fish
Established shelters for birds and wildlife on state land and created a streamlined funding system for purchasing marginal farmland for new shelters.

The Land Protection Act (1935)
Established Conservation Society Service (SCS) to prevent soil erosion and water loss on degraded farmland, continued work of Emergency Soil Erosion Service (SES).

The Taylor-Weide Law (1935)
Free grazing on federal lands has ended and regulated grazing zones have been established statewide, managed by a new grazing service within the Department of the Interior.

trade regulations, transport,

Lift the Prohibition (1933)
The 21st Amendment is passed by Congress, followed by the states.

Export-Import Bank (1934)
Created to facilitate trade with other countries; Started as two banks that merged into one in 1936.

The Reciprocal Commercial Agreements Act (1934)
Leads to trade agreements with 19 countries between 1934 and 1939.

Communications Act (1934)
Formation of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to regulate the radio spectrum.

The Robinson-Patman Law (1936)
Also known as the “Price Discrimination Act”; stricter rules against monopoly control and pricing (mainly for retail chains); supplemented by the Wheeler-Lea Act (1938).

Civil Aviation Act (1938)
Creation of the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA); then split into the Civil Aviation Board (CAB) to run the airlines and the Civil Aviation Authority (later the Federal Aviation Administration) to control air traffic.

country of india

India’s Reorganization Act (1934)
Land was given back or tribal ownership, the development of tribal businesses encouraged, a system of credit established, self-government restored.

Virgin Islands Company (1934)
revitalizing the Virgin Islands’ sugar and rum industries; lowering the unemployment rate; provision of various agricultural services and loan schemes; in cooperation with a homesteading program.

Puerto Rico Reconstruction Administration (PRRA) (1935)
Large-scale public works program employing thousands of unemployed

Oklahoma Indians and Alaskan Natives (1936)
These regions are covered by the provisions of the Indian Reorganization Act.

Civil

Civil Rights Department, Department of Justice (1939)
Examined civil liberties and violations of civil liberties. The predecessor of today’s Civil Rights Commission.

training

Federal Forum Project (1936)
Bringing Americans together to discuss current events and issues.

United States Film Service (1938)
Produce educational and dramatic films on environmental and socio-economic issues. Check out our bio for more informationPare Lorentz.

These abstracts are the work of Brent McKee with assistance from Richard A. Walker.

If you find any errors or omissions, please write to us at i[email protected]

Video tutorials about match the new deal program to what it accomplished.

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In which John Green teaches you about the New Deal, which was president Franklin D. Roosevelt’s plan to pull the United States out of the Great Depression of the 1930s. Did it work? Maybe. John will teach you about some of the most effective and some of the best-known programs of the New Deal. They weren’t always the same thing. John will tell you who supported the New Deal, and who opposed it. He’ll also get into how the New Deal changed the relationship between the government and citizens, and will even reveal just how the Depression ended. (hint: it was war spending)

Hey teachers and students – Check out CommonLit’s free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. President Roosevelt developed his New Deal policies to ease the economic burdens of the Great Depression, a grim reality he began to tackle with his first fireside chat:

-https://www.commonlit.org/texts/president-roosevelt-s-first-fireside-chat

In his Economic Bill of Rights, FDR tried to get the country to trust its banks again:

-https://www.commonlit.org/texts/the-economic-bill-of-rights

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“The New Deal Then and Now: What is the Role of Government in Response to Great Crises?” is a public program hosted by the descendants of the original F.D.R. Cabinet and Brain Trust.

00:00 – Part I: How Did FDR’s New Deal Save the Country, and How Did Promoters of Limited Government Push Back?

Historians address the momentous paradigm shift from a “laissez faire” federal government to an activist one, as well as the conservative pushback of the 1980s and beyond, and lessons for responding to today’s crises.

Panelists:

Jonathan Alter

Nancy MacLean

Henry Scott Wallace (moderator)

50:38 – Part II: What’s at Stake?

What are the great needs of the country in this time of multiple crises, where solutions are mired in Washington gridlock? Expert panelists address some of the most essential categories of American life: jobs, climate, filibuster reform, and voting rights.

Adam Jentleson

David Riemer

Mary Ellen Sprenkel

Michael Waldman

Henry Scott Wallace (moderator)

1:41:44 – Part III: Is it Time for a 21st Century New Deal?

Are circumstances today comparable to the 1930s? Are the American people ready to embrace an activist New Deal-style government truly on their side? Are they willing to raise taxes on the rich and corporations to pay for it? New Deal descendants discuss.

Tomlin Perkins Coggeshall

David Hopkins Giffen

June Hopkins

James Roosevelt, Jr.

Phoebe Roosevelt

Henry Scott Wallace

David Riemer (moderator)

Participating descendants include:

Tomlin Perkins Coggeshall is the grandson of Frances Perkins, FDR’s Labor Secretary, and founder of the Frances Perkins Center.

David Hopkins Giffen is the great-grandson of Harry Hopkins, WPA Administrator and Commerce Secretary, and the Executive Director of Coalition for the Homeless.

June Hopkins is the granddaughter of Harry Hopkins, WPA Administrator and Commerce Secretary, and the author of Harry Hopkins: Sudden Hero, Brash Reformer.

James Roosevelt, Jr. is the grandson of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt and serves as co-chair of the Rules and Bylaws Committee of the Democratic National Committee.

Phoebe Roosevelt is the great-granddaughter of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, a high school history teacher, and an attorney who served in the Affirmative Litigation division of the New York City Law Department.

Henry Scott Wallace is the grandson of Henry A. Wallace, FDR’s Vice President and Secretary of Agriculture and Commerce, and is a former congressional candidate and co-chair of the Wallace Global Fund.

Participating authors, journalists, historians, and advocates include:

Jonathan Alter is a journalist, historian, documentary filmmaker, and the author of The Defining Moment: FDR’s Hundred Days and the Triumph of Hope and, most recently, His Very Best: Jimmy Carter, A Life.

Nancy MacLean is Distinguished Professor of History and Public Policy at Duke University and the author of Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right’s Stealth Plan for America.

David Riemer is a Senior Fellow at Community Advocates Public Policy Institute in Milwaukee, Wisconsin and the author of Putting Government in its Place: The Case for a New Deal 3.0.

Mary Ellen Sprenkel is President and CEO of The Corps Network, a nationwide network of public-service job corps, and helped the White House design the new Civilian Climate Corps.

Michael Waldman is the president of the Brennan Center for Justice at the NYU School of Law and the author of The Fight to Vote and The Second Amendment: A Biography.

Adam Jentleson was deputy chief of staff to former Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and author of Kill Switch: The Rise of the Modern Senate and the Crippling of American Democracy.

As the nation awaits a vote on President Biden’s historic infrastructure bills—a “new New Deal,” as many have called it—Roosevelt House hosts a public conference examining the lessons of FDR’s original New Deal, and how those lessons can inform the federal response to the most challenging set of crises since the Great Depression. The program is led by descendants of Franklin Roosevelt’s own Cabinet members and “Brain Trust.”

This conference is the result of the vision and determination of a group of descendants of the FDR administration who, for more than a year, have urged Congress to embrace a transformational legislative agenda—and launch a 21st Century New Deal for the benefit of all Americans. Joining them for the conference are noted authors, historians, and advocates.

Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute at Hunter College, October 29, 2021.

keywords: #apushnewdeal, #apushfdr, #fdrnewdeal, #newdeal, #newdeal

All APUSH Simplified videos organized by time period:

-https://docs.google.com/document/d/1w5YowGMbHBlf7xPp58TG1P7lvbMWv-2yLQSqT57T2v8/edit?usp=sharing

https://www.loc.gov/exhibits/african-american-odyssey/depression-new-deal-and-world-war-ii.html

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