Best 17 political cartoon on cold war

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Herblock and Fellow Cartoonists Confront the Issues Cold War

  • Author: loc.gov

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  • Summary: Articles about Herblock and Fellow Cartoonists Confront the Issues Cold War Few American editorial cartoonists favored the Soviet government during the Cold War, but they had divergent responses to the fear of nuclear warfare.

  • Match the search results: In the decades after World War II, mutual distrust between the United States and the Soviet Union led to international tension and the chilling threat of nuclear warfare in an era commonly called the “Cold War.” As early as 1946, six out of every ten Americans believed that the Soviet Un…

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Soviet Political Cartoon, ‘Passing the Baton’ – Wilson Center …

  • Author: digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org

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  • Summary: Articles about Soviet Political Cartoon, ‘Passing the Baton’ – Wilson Center … Political cartoon from the Soviet satirical magazine Krokodil. A female character labeled “Cold War” accepts a flaming relay torch with burning letters …

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    Political cartoon from the Soviet satirical magazine Krokodil. A female character labeled "Cold War" accepts a flaming relay torch with burning letters reading "Boycott Olympics" passed by a figure representing the United States. Underneath is the caption, "the b…

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Cold War | The National Library of Wales

  • Author: www.library.wales

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  • Summary: Articles about Cold War | The National Library of Wales Fear was a constant element of the Cold War. This cartoon refers to the fear in the west that the Soviet Union could attack at any moment, and also concern over …

  • Match the search results: Even though spying was an everyday part of the Cold War, international incidents sometimes blew up around covert operations. In May 1960 an American plane was shot down over Soviet airspace. The Soviets said that the plane was spying and demanded an apology, which the Americans refused to give and a…

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The Eagle and the Bear – UMMA Exchange

  • Author: exchange.umma.umich.edu

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  • Summary: Articles about The Eagle and the Bear – UMMA Exchange The Cold War between the United States and the Russian-dominated USSR … of the other, namely political cartoons and official propaganda, …

  • Match the search results: For all of the adulation that surrounded many depictions of the February Revolution in the United States, others took on a much more cynical view of political developments within the country.  The deposition of the Tsarist government, which had been fully committed to the Entente’s war efforts, and …

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Soviet Political Posters and Cartoons | Artists: HK – Brown …

  • Author: library.brown.edu

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  • Summary: Articles about Soviet Political Posters and Cartoons | Artists: HK – Brown … He began to work in the medium of the political poster during the 1930s and … As postwar peace shifted into Cold War tension, the United States and other …

  • Match the search results: Gustav Klutsis — one of the pioneers of the use of photomontage in Soviet graphic arts — combined archival images of political figures, his own family, and street photographs in carefully composed posters of Soviet leaders and workers. He experimented with the techniques of double exposu…

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Soviet Political Cartoon, ‘Passing the Baton’ – Wilson Center …

  • Author: digitalarchive.wilsoncenter.org

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (27167 Ratings)

  • Top rated: 4 ⭐

  • Lowest rating: 2 ⭐

  • Summary: Articles about Soviet Political Cartoon, ‘Passing the Baton’ – Wilson Center … Political cartoon from the Soviet satirical magazine Krokodil. A female character labeled “Cold War” accepts a flaming relay torch with burning letters …

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    Political cartoon from the Soviet satirical magazine Krokodil. A female character labeled "Cold War" accepts a flaming relay torch with burning letters reading "Boycott Olympics" passed by a figure representing the United States. Underneath is the caption, "the b…

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Cold War | The National Library of Wales

  • Author: www.library.wales

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (19262 Ratings)

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  • Summary: Articles about Cold War | The National Library of Wales Fear was a constant element of the Cold War. This cartoon refers to the fear in the west that the Soviet Union could attack at any moment, and also concern over …

  • Match the search results: Even though spying was an everyday part of the Cold War, international incidents sometimes blew up around covert operations. In May 1960 an American plane was shot down over Soviet airspace. The Soviets said that the plane was spying and demanded an apology, which the Americans refused to give and a…

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A 1957 American political cartoon titled “Another Race We …

  • Author: dp.la

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (38744 Ratings)

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  • Summary: Articles about A 1957 American political cartoon titled “Another Race We … This cartoon alludes to the warming relations between the Soviet Union and India, a formerly neutral country in the Cold War.

  • Match the search results: This political cartoon from a St. Louis newspaper sums up America’s despair over the successful Soviet launch of Sputnik, the first satellite to orbit the earth. This cartoon alludes to the warming relations between the Soviet Union and India, a formerly neutral country in the Cold War.

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Cold War Conflict in Vietnam: ‘The Vietnam-Era Presidency’

  • Author: hti.osu.edu

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  • Summary: Articles about Cold War Conflict in Vietnam: ‘The Vietnam-Era Presidency’ Students will collaboratively analyze and compare editorial cartoons focusing on the roles of successive American Presidents during the Vietnam conflict.

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    Department of History

    230 Annie and John Glenn Avenue

    Columbus,

    OH

    43210

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The Marshall Plan from the Perspective Political Cartoons and …

  • Author: www.trumanlibrary.gov

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  • Summary: Articles about The Marshall Plan from the Perspective Political Cartoons and … Analyze political cartoons and political posters via individual and cooperative learning activities … Diploma History with Mr. Conway Cold War Cartoons.

  • Match the search results: To assist students in developing skills that will enable them to analyze political cartoons and political posters and develop an understanding of the different perspectives of the Marshall Plan.

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Herblock Looks at 1962: Fifty Years Ago in Editorial Cartoons

  • Author: go.usa.gov

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (20425 Ratings)

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  • Summary: Articles about Herblock Looks at 1962: Fifty Years Ago in Editorial Cartoons Herblock developed his character “Mr. Atom” in 1946 to visualize the threat of nuclear annihilation omnipresent during the Cold War between the Soviet Union …

  • Match the search results: For the 1962 election campaign, Herblock used the metaphor of a door-to-door brush salesman whose patter goes unheeded, because he felt that the political races had bored voters into tuning out. In the 1960s less than two-thirds of eligible voters went to the polls. Newspaper articles pointed out th…

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Cold War political cartoon – The American Century

  • Author: americancentury.omeka.wlu.edu

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (30932 Ratings)

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  • Summary: Articles about Cold War political cartoon – The American Century Cold War political cartoon … by efforts by both sides to widen their spheres of influence through political, military, and technological superiority.

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“Stick ’em up!” June 9, 1964 | IDCA

  • Author: iowaculture.gov

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  • Summary: Articles about “Stick ’em up!” June 9, 1964 | IDCA The political cartoon is a black and white image of LBJ and a Vietnamese soldier. Courtesy of Library of Congress, Valtman, Edmund S., “Stick ’em up!” The …

  • Match the search results: This political cartoon shows the irony of the conflict in Vietnam. At the time the cartoon was created, the United States had the most advanced nuclear arsenal, however, all of the advanced technology did not guarantee the U.S. a victory in Vietnam. Following the events at the Gulf of Tonkin, the Un…

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Media Discourse as a Symbolic Contest: The Bomb in Political …

  • Author: www.jstor.org

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (33573 Ratings)

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  • Summary: Articles about Media Discourse as a Symbolic Contest: The Bomb in Political … results suggest certain dilemmas and vulnerabilities in Cold War packages and … KEY WORDS: cartoons; political symbolism; nuclear war; Soviet-American …

  • Match the search results: The mass media provide a series of arenas in which symbolic contests are carried out among competing sponsors of meaning. Measuring the display of competing interpretations is a way of assessing relative success. The Cold War period involved a long competition within the United States between two co…

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Jim Berryman cartoon, “Anybody Working?” October 6,1957

  • Author: www.visitthecapitol.gov

  • Evaluate 4 ⭐ (36939 Ratings)

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  • Summary: Articles about Jim Berryman cartoon, “Anybody Working?” October 6,1957 … political cartoonist Jim Berryman captured America’s anxious response to the … technology, languages, and other essential skills for Cold War defense, …

  • Match the search results: In a deft drawing of an observatory that resembled both the U.S. Capitol and Sputnik, political cartoonist Jim Berryman captured America’s anxious response to the successful launch of the Soviet satellite. The “men watching” sign emphasized the United States’ position of witness as the Soviet Union …

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Cornered?, cartoon by Edwin Marcus, March 26, 1950 – US …

  • Author: www.visitthecapitol.gov

  • Evaluate 3 ⭐ (3937 Ratings)

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  • Summary: Articles about Cornered?, cartoon by Edwin Marcus, March 26, 1950 – US … Joseph McCarthy: America on Trial 1953-1954. As America and the Soviet Union faced off in the Cold War, sensational charges of Soviet spying triggered …

  • Match the search results: McCarthy called hundreds of witnesses, browbeating and intimidating them. His charges of Communist subversion in the U.S. Army culminated in the 1954 televised Army–McCarthy hearings. When Army Counsel Joseph Welch challenged the senator’s reckless charges, asking, “Have you no sense of decency, sir…

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Two Worlds: Boris Efimov, Soviet Political Caricature, and the …

  • Author: www.oxfordhandbooks.com

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  • Summary: Articles about Two Worlds: Boris Efimov, Soviet Political Caricature, and the … This article analyzes the political cartoons of Boris Efimov, one of the most … Soviet Political Caricature, and the Construction of the Long Cold War …

  • Match the search results: This article analyzes the political cartoons of Boris Efimov, one of the most significant Soviet propagandists, and how they helped to construct a Soviet way of seeing the world. Published in major newspapers and journals, Efimov’s caricatures, along with those of his fellow political cartoonists, a…

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Multi-read content political cartoon on cold war

Video tutorials about political cartoon on cold war

keywords: #ColdWar, #APUSH, #JoczProductions, #U.S.History

Learn American history through political cartoons. In this episode we examine Cold War for all your AP U.S. History and U.S. History learning needs.

More U.S. History videos:

www.apushexplained.com

Origins of the Cold War:

-https://youtu.be/u-SSdOJ1HAc

Cold War History Meme Review:

-https://youtu.be/WtexGX5dEqU

Cold War Fully Explained:

-https://youtu.be/OxTsEnG_kx4

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This animated short film is a Cold War-era propaganda product presented by the United States Chamber of Commerce. The main goal of the cartoon is to glorify the capitalism and the free enterprise system.

The film does a great job of demonstrating the basic concepts of capitalism. It explains how business and competition works. It says that we pay taxes to have schools, hospitals, roads, fire and police departments, aid to the needy and obviously national defense. It also says that we shouldn’t want the government to provide non essential services since they have to be paid for by higher taxes.

The film was produced by John Sutherland. The Freedoms Foundation awarded the film its gold honor medal as “the best film developed in the United States during 1954 to further better understanding of the American way of life”.

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND / CONTEXT

After World War 2 nuclear anxiety, anti-Communism and international political realignments fueled the Cold War-era United States and turned the country’s media landscape into a battleground from the late 1940s on. In the press, on the radio, and increasingly through the newly emerging medium of television, business and labor struggled for power over the national consciousness. These opposing forces fought to redefine the economic structure of the American nation.

To most working people, postwar “normalcy” meant a final farewell to Depression-induced privation, access to consumer goods unavailable during the war years, and a redistribution of the economic pie through the newly powerful labor movement. To business, however, the end of hostilities promised freedom from New Deal liberalism. Corporations sought an end to planning and government influence, to communist, socialist and labor movements, and above all, shrinkage of the public sector, swollen in sixteen years of economic depression and war. Both sides characterized their points of view as patriotic and their opponents as un-American.

Business fought for influence through organizations like the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. Their intentions were presented as lofty and neutral: to educate Americans about their economic system and its benefits. Launching a giant propaganda offensive, these organizations pumped out press releases, published books, organized public and private meetings, bought advertising and produced motion pictures.

Differences between capitalism and communism:

Capitalism and communism are two political theories which can be stated as the complete opposite of one another as their fundamental ideologies contrast each other in the most prominent ways.

Capitalism can best be defined as a financial and a social system that recognizes individual property rights, individual consumption and approves of the private ownership of capital. It gave rise to the industrialization and is based on the rights of the individual and allows individuals unlimited opportunities in creating wealth for themselves. Capitalism also encourages the individual to own as much property and goods that they can afford to buy which in turn results in inequality. This inequality then results in each citizen striving to accumulate more wealth in order to stand above the rest and yet, each individual is supposed to respect the rights of other individuals. The citizens of a capitalist society are provided with equal opportunity when competing as sellers or buyers of goods or property, with the government playing no part in it except setting up certain rules and regulations regarding the process. Capitalism is honest competition and letting the marketplace decide who has the better product for better prices and one sees no oppression of the individual here as a result.

Communism is based on the belief that individual gain must be scarified in order to achieve collective gain. Thus communism allows the state or the community the ownership of all goods and services with the intention of promoting a common ownership. Communism preaches of a classless, egalitarian society where everybody is treated equally and everybody is given an equal standing. According to communists, capitalism is a system within the rich get richer and the poor get poorer as a result of the rich people yielding power when the poor are forced to live under their reign.

It’s Everybody’s Business | Cold War Era Propaganda Cartoon on Capitalism \u0026 Free Enterprise | 1954

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keywords: #KingJoe, #cartoon, #cartoons, #animation, #animated, #film, #animatedfilm, #animatedshort, #shortfilm, #video, #oldcartoon, #vintagecartoon, #propaganda, #propagandacartoon, #propagandafilm, #Americanpropaganda, #USpropaganda, #ColdWarcartoon, #ColdWarpropaganda, #capitalism, #capitalist, #workers, #Americanworkers, #employment, #labor, #laborers, #laborforce, #work, #job, #jobs, #factory, #industry, #industrial, #Americanindustry, #usindustry, #economy, #US, #USA, #UnitedStates, #America, #American, #history

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This 1949 Technicolor cartoon is a Cold War-era propaganda film aimed at American workers with the objective of convincing them of their good fortune. It shows us the life of a common working man in America, and how he is able to achieve financial success for himself thanks to investment, competition, research, and technology.

Joe, an average American working man who, wears overalls and talks with a pseudo-Brooklyn accent, is “king of the workers of the world” not because he is worthy, but because the machinery in his factory “multiplies strength and efficiency.” We also learn that Joe is “king” not because he can exert power over anything, but because “he can buy more with his wages than any other worker on the globe.”

We gets a nicely illustrated introduction to then-standard basic economic theories of production and investment that “make the United States the industrial master of the world”. As proof that the American capitalist system is the most wonderful on earth, the narrator informs us that Americans own 72% of the cars in the world, 92% of the bathtubs, and “practically all the refrigerators in existence.” The narrator sums up the attitude industrial America was pushing: “Labor and management must continue to increase the production of better goods at lower prices so that more people will be able to buy the things that make life easier and happier for all of us.”

The cartoon is a John Sutherland production. It is one of the “fun and facts about America” series, made “to create a deeper understanding of what has made America the finest place in the world to live.”

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND / CONTEXT

The Cold War (1947-1991) was in many respects a struggle for the hearts and minds of people everywhere. That competition was carried out through massive American and Soviet propaganda campaigns to isolate the respective opponent internationally, win the approval of world opinion, and consolidate the own sphere of influence. Every opportunity from art exhibits to international sports events, and every medium from radio to television, was used to fight the propaganda war.

During the Cold War, films functioned as a means to influence and control public opinion internally. The United States and the Soviet Union invested heavily in propaganda designed to influence the hearts and minds of people around the world, especially using motion pictures. Cold War films produced by both sides attempted to address different facets of the superpower conflict and sought to influence both domestic and foreign opinion. The gap between American and Soviet film gave the Americans a distinct advantage over the Soviet Union; America was readily prepared to utilize their cinematic achievements as a way to effectively impact the public opinion in a way the Soviet Union could not. Cinema, Americans hoped, would help close the gap caused by Soviet development of nuclear weapons and advancements in space technology. The use of film as an effective form of widespread propaganda transformed cinema into another Cold War battlefront.

American films incorporated a wide scale of Cold War themes and issues into all genres of film, which gave American motion pictures a particular lead over Soviet film. Despite the audiences’ lack of zeal for Anti-Communist/Cold War related cinema, the films produced evidently did serve as successful propaganda in both America and the USSR. The films released during this time received a response from the Soviet Union, which subsequently released its own array of films to combat the depiction of the Communist threat.

Television and advertising played key roles in constructing the image of an ideal American way of life. American propaganda functioned to shore up support and national pride by projecting an image of prosperity, freedom and strength. In many ways, however, these images were fantasy. They contrasted and conflicted with many American’s real life.

Meet King Joe | 1949 | Cold War Era American Propaganda Cartoon

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keywords: #politicalcartoons

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