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21st century is what years

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21st century – Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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  • Summary: Articles about 21st century – Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The 21st century started on January 1, 2001 and will end on December 31, 2100. It is the current century. Years[change | change source].

  • Match the search results: The 21st century started on January 1, 2001 and will end on December 31, 2100. It is the current century.

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Beginning of the 21st Century and the Third Millennium

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  • Summary: Articles about Beginning of the 21st Century and the Third Millennium Years of the Gregorian calendar, which is currently in use, are counted from AD 1. Thus, the 1st century comprised the years AD 1 through AD 100 …

  • Match the search results:        Years of the Gregorian calendar, which is currently in use, are counted from AD 1. Thus, the 1st century comprised the years AD 1 through AD 100. The second century started with AD 101 and continued through AD 200. By extrapolation, the 20th century comprises the…

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Centuries and How to Refer to Them | Merriam-Webster

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  • Summary: Articles about Centuries and How to Refer to Them | Merriam-Webster And as we all know, we’re currently in the 21st century, but the years start with 20. And in the 20th century, they all started with 19, and in the 19th, with …

  • Match the search results: *But back to those implications we mentioned above: will the years of the 22nd century really all start with 21? It depends on who you ask. Some people think the 22nd century will start January 1, 2100 and end December 31, 2199, with the 23rd century beginning on January 1, 2200. But there is a long…

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why is it called 21st century – Lisbdnet.com

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  • Summary: Articles about why is it called 21st century – Lisbdnet.com The 21st century is the current century of the Anno Domini era or the Common Era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. It began on January …

  • Match the search results: when was the 21st centurywhat century are we in21st century timelinewhat century are we in 2020is 2021 the 21st century21st century skills21st century literature

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Common questions about dates (article) | Khan Academy

  • Author: www.khanacademy.org

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  • Summary: Articles about Common questions about dates (article) | Khan Academy 400 B.C.E. means approximately 400 years Before the Common Era. Why 2012 is in the 21st Century.

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2021: 21st year of 21st century will repeat in 2027, 2100 – The …

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  • Summary: Articles about 2021: 21st year of 21st century will repeat in 2027, 2100 – The … The numeral 2021 is the 21st year of the 21st century. The non-leap year began on a Friday and will end on a Friday. The calendar of 2021 is the …

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For the 2000th Time, the 21st Begins in 2001

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  • Summary: Articles about For the 2000th Time, the 21st Begins in 2001 I quote the World Almanac and Book of Facts: “A century consists of 100 consecutive calendar years. The first century consisted of the years 1 …

  • Match the search results: I quote the World Almanac and Book of Facts: “A century consists of 100 consecutive calendar years. The first century consisted of the years 1 through 100. The 20th Century consists of the years 1901 through 2000 and will end Dec. 31, 2000. The 21st Century will begin Jan. 1, 2001.”

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2021: 21st year of 21st century will repeat in 2027, 2100 – The …

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  • Summary: Articles about 2021: 21st year of 21st century will repeat in 2027, 2100 – The … The calendar of 2021 is the same as the year 2010, and will repeat in 2027, and in 2100, the last year of the 21st century.

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Is this the most important century in human history? – Vox

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  • Summary: Articles about Is this the most important century in human history? – Vox The 21st century is the most important century in human history. … There are 50,000 years of human history behind us, and potentially …

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history of technology – The 20th and 21st centuries | Britannica

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  • Summary: Articles about history of technology – The 20th and 21st centuries | Britannica In venturing to interpret the events of the 20th century, it will be convenient to separate the years before 1945 from those that followed. The years 1900 …

  • Match the search results: There were profound political changes in the 20th century related to technological capacity and leadership. It may be an exaggeration to regard the 20th century as “the American century,” but the rise of the United States as a superstate was sufficiently rapid and dramatic to excuse the hyperbole. I…

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Battle of the Centuries – Library of Congress

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  • Summary: Articles about Battle of the Centuries – Library of Congress To complete a century, one must complete 100 years; the first century of our … 45 on) will indicate, plans to celebrate the opening of the 21st century …

  • Match the search results: The source of the confusion is easy to discern; ever since learning how to
    write, we have dated our documents with year designations beginning with the
    digits 19. Obviously, when we must begin to date them starting with 20, we
    have embarked on a new century! Haven’t we? The answer is no, we ha…

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Competition in the 21st Century – 1st Edition – Kirk Tyson

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  • Summary: Articles about Competition in the 21st Century – 1st Edition – Kirk Tyson Ten years in the making, this book paints competition of the future based on in-depth research of worldwide business over the past 100 years. By analogy, it …

  • Match the search results: On a Clear Day You Can See the 21st CenturyA Peek at the Future: Industries with the Inside Track and Those That Will DerailThe New Centurions: A Business Smorgasbord of Successful Global Companies, Leaders and Business Practices of the FutureTime Warp: The Ghosts of Business Past, Why They’re Still…

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21st century – Fandom

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  • Summary: Articles about 21st century – Fandom For information about Star Trek releases and related events in the 21st century, please see the production timeline. I’ve …

  • Match the search results: The 21st century, defined in the calendar of Earth as the period from 2001 to 2100, was a decisive turning point in Human history. After World War III devastated large parts of Earth placing Humanity in near-extinction, Zefram Cochrane made his historic jump to Warp 1 with the Phoenix making First c…

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21st Century Children – OECD

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  • Summary: Articles about 21st Century Children – OECD 21st Century Children looks at the nature of modern childhood and the ways in which schools and communities can work together to protect and guide children …

  • Match the search results: 21st Century Children looks at the nature of modern childhood and the ways in which‌ schools and communities can work together to protect and guide children while still allowing them the flexibility to make their own mistakes. 

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Timeline Of 20th And 21st Century Wars – Imperial War …

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  • Summary: Articles about Timeline Of 20th And 21st Century Wars – Imperial War … Military conflict took place during every year of the 20th Century. There were only short periods of time that the world was free of war.

  • Match the search results: Conflict took place in every year of the 20th Century; the world was free from the violence caused by war for only very short periods of time. It has been estimated that 187 million people died as a result of war from 1900 to the present. The actual number is likely far higher.

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Launching IFMBE into the 21st Century: 50 Years and Counting

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  • Summary: Articles about Launching IFMBE into the 21st Century: 50 Years and Counting This book has been created for the 50th anniversary of the International Federation for Medical and Biological Enineering and Computing IFMBE.

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Why we say 21st Century for years starting 20… – English …

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  • Summary: Articles about Why we say 21st Century for years starting 20… – English … Years beginning 20xx are described as the 21st Century because of the way we describe age in English – this is how it works!

  • Match the search results: From 1 onward, the century begin
    1 called 1st century =100years,
    2 called 2nd century = 200years,
    3 called 3rd century =300years,
    4 called 4th century = 400years, etc till
    10 called 10th century = 1000years
    11 called 11th century = 1100years, etc till 18 called 18th century = 1800years
    19 called 19t…

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Children of the 21st century: The first five years – UCL Discovery

  • Author: discovery.ucl.ac.uk

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  • Summary: Articles about Children of the 21st century: The first five years – UCL Discovery This book is the second in a series of books which will report on the findings from the data and follows on from Children of the 21st century: From birth to …

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    Hansen, K;

    Joshi, H;

    Dex, S;

    (2010)

    Children of the 21st century: The fi…

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Multi-read content 21st century is what years

21st Century Timeline21st Century (disambiguation)

Millennium: 3rd millennium
Century: 20th century
The 21st Century
22nd century
Timeline: 20th century
The 21st Century
22nd century
Heads of State: 20th century
The 21st Century
22nd century
Many Decades: 2000s2010s2020s2030s2040s 2050s2060s2070s2080s2090s
Type: Birth – death facility – facility for the disabled

Thatday 21(twenty-one)centuryit is the presentcenturyInsidealternating currentera orcommon era, UnderGregorian calendar. It started on January 1, 2001 (MMI) and ends on December 31, 2100 (MMC).[First]

The beginning of the 21st century marks the rise of aglobal economyandThird World consumerism, deepened global concerns about terrorism thereafterSeptember 11, 2001, terrorist attacksand increaseprivate company.[2][3][4]NATO intervenesAfghanistanandIraqthe early 2000s and overthrew several regimesArabic springThe early 2010s saw mixed resultsArab world, resulting in a numbercivil warand political instability.[5]ThatUnited States of Americaquietglobal superpower, duringChinais now considered oneemerging global superpower.

In 2017, 49.3% of the world’s population lived in “some form of democracy”, although only 4.5% lived in “full democracies”.[6]The United Nations estimates that two-thirds of the world’s population will be urbanized by 2050; the opposite of a century ago, when less than a third lived in cities.

European Unionhas been greatly expanded in the 21st century, adds13 member countries, butUnited Kingdom withdraw. MostEuropean UnionMember States introduced a common currency,Euro. ThatOrganization of the North Atlantic Treaty(NATO) has also expanded significantly in the 21st century, he added11 member countries.

effect ofthe global warmingandRise of the sea levelaggravatingecological crisis, with eight islands disappearing between 2007 and 2014.[7][8th][9]

Since the beginning of 2020,Pandemic caused by covid-19began to spread rapidly worldwide, killing and causing more than 6 million people worldwideThe global economy is severely disrupted, includingbiggest global recessionsinceBig Crisis.

With the increase ofmobile device, which more than half of the world population has access toInternetin 2018.[ten]After the success ofHuman Gene Protection Project,DNA testServices become available and affordable.[11][Twelfth]

  • 1 pronunciation
  • 2 guilds
  • 2.1 Knowledge and Information
    2.2 Culture and Politics
    2.3 Population and urbanization
    2.4 Economy, Education and Retirement
    2.5 Language diversity
  • 3 events
  • 3.1 2000s
    3.2 the 2010s
    3/3/2020
  • 4 Politics, War and States
  • 4.1 New States and Territory Changes
  • 5 science and technology
  • 5.1 Space Exploration
    5.2 Physics
    5.3 Mathematics
    5.4 Biotechnology and medicine
    5.5 Telecommunications
  • 6 civil unrest
  • 7 disasters
  • 7.1 Disasters
    7.2 Man-Caused Disasters
  • 8 Pandemics and Epidemics
  • 9 Economy and Industry
  • 10 sports
  • 10.1 Association Football
    10.2 Crickets
    10.3 Gridiron Soccer
    10.4 Golfing
    10.5 Sport Motorcycles
    10.6 Rugby Union
    10.7 Tennis (men)
    10.8 Tennis (women)
  • 11 Arts and Entertainment
  • 11.1 Art
    11.2 Music
    11.3 Television
  • 12 issues and concerns
  • 13 astronomical events
  • 14 See more
  • 15 references
  • 16 Read More
  • 17 External links

articulation[Editor]

There is a general lack of consensus on how to pronounce certain 21st century years in English. Scholars have shown that the early years of the last century are often pronounced, for example, as “eighteen years” (for 1805) and “nineteen years” (for 1905).[13]Generally speaking,the early years of the 21st centuryis pronounced “two thousand (and) years”, with a change occurring around 2010, when pronunciation frequently alternates between the first year form of “two thousand and ten” and the more succinct traditional form of “twenty”.

ThatOlympic Games in Vancouver, which took place in 2010, was officially mentioned byVancouver 2010is the “Twenty Ten Olympics”.

company[Editor]

shanghaiChina

Technical advances such assupersonic, prenatal genetic testing andgenetic engineeringare changing the demographics and possibly the genetic make-up of the population. Becausesex-selective abortion, fewer girls are being born in the 21st century (and since the early 1980s) than in previous centuries, mainly becauseboy’s hobbyin East and South Asia. In 2014, only 47% of births in India were girls.[14]This has led to an increasebachelorin countries like China and India. The firstgenetically modified childrenborn in November 2018 inChina, which ushered in a new biological era for mankind and caused great controversy.

Worries[15]anddepression[16]rate has increasedUnited States of Americaand in many other places in the world. However,SuicideThis rate has declined in Europe and most of the rest of the world this century, and has fallen by 29% globally between 2000 and 2018, although it has increased by 18%United States of AmericaIn the same period. Suicide rates fell most significantly among Chinese and Indian women, the elderly, and middle-aged Russian men.[17][18]

knowledge and information[Editor]

In totalwritten workof humanity from the beginningremember historyuntil 2003, as far as knownlanguage, is estimated at fiveexabytesData.[19][20]Since 2003, at the beginning ofsocial mediaand “User Generated Content”, the same amount of data generated every two days.[21]The development of human knowledge and information continues in aexponential rate.

telecommunicationsmuch more advanced and widespread at the beginning of the 21st century than at the end of the 20th century. Only a few percent of the world populationInternetusers andmobile phoneowner in the late 1990s; As of 2018, 55% of the world’s population is online and as of 2019, an estimated 67% own a mobile phone.[22]In the 2010sartificial intelligence, mainly in shapestudy carefullyandmachine learning, has become increasingly popular and used in prominent waysgmailandGoogleSearch engine for banks, military and other areas. In 2017, 14% of the world’s population still had no access to electricity.[23]

Prayag Kumbh Melareligious festival

in 2001,Dennis Titobe the firstspace tourism, the era of begancommercial space. businessmanElon MuskandRichard Bransonworks on commercial space exploration, colonization and tourism whileChinaandIndiahave made significant advances in their space programs. On January 3, 2019, China landed a robotic spacecraftother side of the moon, the first to do so.[24]

culture and politics[Editor]

International relations since 1989

War and violence have decreased significantly since the 20th century, continuing a post-World War II trend known asLong Lasting Peace.malnutritionandpoorstill prevalent around the world, but few people live in the worst forms of poverty. In 1990 about a quarter of the world’s population was malnourished and almost 36% of the world’s population lived in Indiaextremely poor; by 2015, those numbers had fallen to about an eighth, or 10 percent.

ThatFacebook data scandal – Cambridge Analyticadraw international attention to the potential detrimental effects of social media in influencing public opinion, particularly in relation toUS Presidential Election 2016.

population and urbanization[Editor]

Thatworld populationwas about 6.1 billion at the beginning of the 21st century and reached 7.8 billion by March 2020. That’s itestimated achievedalmost 8.6 billion by 2030,[25]and 9.8 billion by 2050. Theounited nationThe World Urbanization Outlook predicts that 60% of the world’s population will live theresuper cityandmegalopolisesby 2030, 70% by 2050 and 90% by 2080. Investments are expected to be more than five times current global levels by 2040.gross domestic productlikely to be part of the urban infrastructure.[26]

longevityhas increased asinfant mortality ratecontinue to decrease. For example, a baby born in 2016 lives on average (worldwide) to 72 years – 26 years longer than the global average for someone born in 1950. Ten millionBrothers(16% ofUnited Kingdompopulation) live to an average of 100 years or older.[27]

climate changeremains a serious concern; UN chief António Guterres, for example, described it as “existential threat”for humanity.[28]More,The Holocene ExtinctionEvent, the sixth major extinction event in Earth’s history, continued with widespread degradationhabitat biodiversityas a by-product of human activity.[29]

no contact tribe

Business, Education and Retirement[Editor]

Economically and politically, the United States and Western Europe dominated at the turn of the century; sameThe 2010s, China will be oneemerging global superpowerand in a way the worldlargest economy. conditionspurchasing power parityIndia’s economy is gaining in importanceJapanaround 2011.[30]

Bitcoinand otherelectronic moneyare decentralized currencies that are not controlled by any central bank. These currencies are enjoying increasing popularity around the world due to the ever-increasing availabilityInternetand serves mainly assave value.

There is a continuous effect oftechnology unemploymentbecauseautomationandcomputerization: The percentage of jobs that disappear – as machines replace them – is expected to increase.[thirty-one]Automation is changing the number of jobs and skill needs of industries. As of 2019, the production output is fromFirst World Countries“Manufacturing has more than doubled since 1984; but it is now produced with less than a third of the workers and greatly reducedoperating cost.[32]Half of the jobs that require less than a bachelor’s degree are currently being replaced by partial or full automation.[33]

ThatWorld Economic Forumpredicts that 65% of children go to schoolelementary schoolwill end up in a job or career that doesn’t currently exist.[34]

Due to the increase, an increase in the retirement age was demandedlongevityand has been adopted in many jurisdictions.[35][36]

Different languages[Editor]

Since 2009,SIL ethnologistcataloged 6,909 living human languages.[37]The exact number of known living languages ​​varies between 5,000 and 10,000, depending generally on how accurate one’s definition of “language” is and particularly on how one classifies dialects.

Estimates depend on many factors, but the consensus is that between 6,000 and 7,000 languages ​​are spoken today. Between 50 and 90% of them will become extinct by 2100.[38]

ThatTop 20 languagesSpoken by more than 50 million speakers each, spoken by 50% of the world’s population. In contrast, many other languages ​​are spoken by small communities, most with fewer than 10,000 speakers.[38]

incident[Editor]

21st Century Timeline

2000s[Editor]

Second Congo War

  • 1998–2003 – Events
  • Second Congo War
  • continued into the early 21st century. A 1999 ceasefire was quickly broken and the UN peacekeeping mission,
  • MONUC
  • She couldn’t control the battle. army out
  • Rwanda
  • and
  • Uganda
  • continue to support rebel groups against
  • Democratic Republic of Congo
  • Rifts have also grown between Rwanda and Uganda as they accuse each other of supporting rival rebel groups.
  • Laurent Kabila
  • , President of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, was assassinated in January 2001 and his son,
  • Joseph Kabila
  • , Perfomance. Steps towards peace were taken during 2002 and both Rwanda and Uganda withdrew from the country. On December 17, 2002, a major treaty officially ended the war. However, the Democratic Republic of the Congo holds power in less than half of the country, with most eastern and northern regions still controlled by rebel groups where significant internal fighting still rages. In addition, Rwanda still supports anti-DRC rebels, and the anti-Rwanda rebels continue to operate out of DRC. It is estimated that the war killed an estimated 3.9 million people, displaced nearly 5.5 million and caused widespread and prolonged famine that resulted in deaths. Serious human rights violations continue to be reported.
  • [39]
  • 2001

Mr George W BushPresidents of States

  • January 20: George W. Bush takes office as the 43rd President of the United States. He is the second President of the Bush family.
    1/4: The Netherlands becomes the first country in the world to legalize same-sex marriage.
    May 13: Conservative media tycoon Silvio Berlusconi wins Italy’s general election and becomes the country’s prime minister. Berlusconi would dominate Italian political life for the rest of the decade.
    June 1: The Royal Massacre of Nepal occurs at a house in the grounds of the Narayanhity Royal Palace, the residence of the Nepalese monarchy. Ten family members were killed during a monthly royal reunion dinner or party indoors. The dead included King Birendra of Nepal and Queen Aishwarya.
    20-22 July: During the 27th G8 summit, over 200,000 anti-globalization protesters demonstrated in Genoa, with two protesters killed by Italian police. On July 21, a group of carabinieri attacked the Armando Diaz school, seriously injuring many peaceful demonstrators. Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi stressed that the police use the minimum amount of force to achieve their goals.

9/11 attacks

  • September 11: Attacks September 11-19 Al Qaeda terrorists hijack 4 airliners and crash 2 into the World Trade Center, one into the Pentagon and one into the World Trade Center field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania United States on September 11 September, nearly 3,000 people killed. President George W. Bush then declared the war on terror.
    December 11: After 15 years of negotiations, the People’s Republic of China becomes a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO).
  • 2001–2014 – Events
  • Northern Alliance
  • and
  • Nato
  • -lead to
  • ISAF
  • aggression
  • Afghanistan
  • Above
  • October 7, 2001
  • , and overthrow the faction that supported Al Qaeda
  • Taliban
  • Government. The military remains in place to form a democratic government, fight a slowly escalating insurgency, and track down the al-Qaeda leader.
  • Osama Bin Laden
  • who is
  • was killed
  • about
  • United States Army
  • nearly 10 years later, on May 2, 2011. On December 24, 2014, NATO forces officially ended combat operations in Afghanistan; but the power remains to the present.
  • 2002
  • May 20: After a long occupation by Indonesia, East Timor’s independence is recognized by Portugal and the United Nations.
    July 1: The International Criminal Court (ICC) is established.
    September 10: Switzerland becomes a member of the United Nations as a neutral country.
    October 12: Jemaah Islamiyah, a violent Muslim group, claims responsibility for detonating three bombs in the tourist area of ​​Kuta on the Indonesian island of Bali. The attack killed 202 people and injured 209.
    November 15: Hu Jintao becomes General Secretary of the Chinese Communist Party, becoming China’s post-Jiang Zemin supreme leader.
  • 2003–present – In February 2003, a conflict erupted in
  • Darfur
  • ,
  • Sudan
  • , started and quickly escalated in
  • Total war
  • . As of 2008, an estimated 400,000 people had been killed and more than 2.5 million people displaced. In 2005, the ICC ruled that Darfur’s war criminals should be tried, and on July 14, 2008, the President of Sudan
  • Omar al-Bashir
  • was charged with 5 accounts of
  • crimes against humanity
  • and 2 war crimes reports, although the ICC does not have the power to enforce these charges.
  • 2003–2010 – Events
  • United States-led coalition
  • aggression
  • Iraq
  • on March 20, 2003 and overthrew the government of
  • Saddam Hussein
  • (who was executed by the Iraqi government on December 30, 2006). Coalition forces remained in the country to form a democratic government and fight an escalating insurgency. In addition to an uprising against the US presence, there was also an uprising in Iraq
  • civil war
  • many years. The war was soon viewed by many governments as a central frontline in the war on terror, despite growing international dissatisfaction with the war. That
  • total number of deaths
  • has been estimated at nearly 150,000, but these estimates are disputed, with one controversial study estimating as many as over 1 million.
  • [40]
  • After that, the US-led coalition began
  • increase troops
  • In 2007, the number of victims was significantly reduced. The fight ended, at least officially, in August 2010.
  • 2003–2005 – A series
  • nonviolence
  • revolution
  • called
  • color revolution
  • overthrow governments
  • Georgia
  • ,
  • Ukraine
  • ,
  • Kyrgyz
  • , and
  • Lebanon
  • .
  • 2003
  • December: Libyan head of state Muammar Gaddafi announces that Libya will voluntarily eliminate all weapons of mass destruction.
  • 2004
  • March 11: 10 explosions occurred on the Cercanías commuter train system in Madrid, Spain, killing 191 people and injuring about 2,000.
    May 1: The European Union expands to 10 countries (8 former communist countries plus Malta and Cyprus).
    September 1: A group of Chechen rebels infiltrate a school in Beslan, taking thousands of hostages for three days. A series of shootings and bombings killed 334 and injured 750.
    Nov 11: Palestinian leader and President of the Palestine Liberation Organization Yasser Arafat dies in France at the age of 75 of a hemorrhagic stroke.
    November 18: Massachusetts becomes the first US state to legalize same-sex marriage.
  • 2005
  • July 7: Four radical Islamic suicide bombers plant three bombs in London; 56 people were killed, including four suicide bombers.
    November 19: After the death of Pope John Paul II in April, Joseph Ratzinger of Germany becomes Pope Benedict XVI. chosen.
    November 22: Angela Merkel becomes Germany’s first elected chancellor.

Angela MerkelJose Manuel Barroso

  • 2006–2008 – Former dismantling
  • Yugoslavia
  • continue later
  • Montenegro
  • gained independence on June 3, 2006 and
  • Kosovo
  • declared independence on February 17, 2008. However, Kosovo’s independence is disputed by Russia and many of its allies, and only
  • partially recognized
  • .
  • 2006
  • July 12 Hezbollah crosses the Lebanese border and captures two Israeli soldiers. Israel responded by sending troops across the border and bombing Hezbollah strongholds, while Hezbollah fired about six rockets a day at cities in northern Israel. At the end of the war, 1,200 Lebanese civilians, 500 Hezbollah were shot dead, 44 Israeli civilians and 121 Israeli soldiers were killed. A ceasefire was signed on August 14, after which Israeli troops withdrew from Lebanon.
    October 9: North Korea conducts its first nuclear test on October 9. [41] This followed years of political disputes with the United States over the status of its nuclear program.
  • 2007-2008 –
  • Nepal
  • ‘S
  • Centuries-old monarchy
  • was overthrown and the country became a republic.
  • 2007
  • January 1: Bulgaria and Romania join the European Union.
    January 25: In June, a civil war in Gaza escalates, resulting in Hamas eventually expelling most of the forces loyal to Fatah from the Gaza Strip. In response, Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas sacked Hamas Prime Minister Ismail Haniyeh and dissolved the Hamas-ruled parliament. The distributed conflict continues.
    July 25: Pratibha Patil becomes the first woman to be elected President of India.
    13 December: 27 EU member states sign the Lisbon Treaty, which came into force on 1 December 2009.
  • 2007-2008 –
  • crisis
  • Follow
  • Kenya presidential election 2007
  • , leading to the formation of a coalition government
  • Mwai Kibaki
  • as President and
  • Raila Odinga
  • as prime minister.
  • 2008
  • February 17: Kosovo unilaterally declares its independence from Serbia. Serbia refuses to recognize Kosovo, considering it part of its territory.
    April 1: Some Nepali Communist Party (Centre Maoist) cadres attacked the senior leader of the Nepalese Parliament, Bal Chandra Poudel, during elections in Rasuwa, Nepal.
    1st-12th August: An armed conflict breaks out between Georgia on the one hand and the Russian Federation with the Ossetians and Abkhazians on the other. Russia officially recognized the independence of Abkhazia and South Ossetia.
    November 4: Barack Obama is elected the first African American President of the United States. He was sworn into office in January 2009. He received the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize from the Norwegian Nobel Committee, which recognized “his extraordinary efforts in strengthening international diplomacy and cooperation among peoples,” and accepted the award the following year with “deep gratitude and great humility.”

Barack ObamaAfrican AmericanchairmanUnited States of AmericaDmitry MedvedevStrategic Arms Reduction Treaty

  • 2009
  • June 13: A protest against Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad begins in Iran after the presidential election.

The 2010s[Editor]

Julia GilardPrime Minister of Australia

Osama bin Laden’s deathThe White House

  • 2010
  • June 24: Julia Gillard becomes Australia’s first woman Prime Minister.
    South Africa is the first country in Africa to host the FiFa World Cup.
    April 10: Polish President Lech Kaczyński dies in a plane crash near the city of Smolensk, Russia, along with his wife and 94 others on board.
    November 13 Burmese opposition leader and 1991 Nobel Peace Prize laureate Aung San Suu Kyi is released from prison after having been imprisoned since 1989.
    December 17: The Arab Spring, a wave of revolution, started in Tunisia, spread to the countries of the Middle East, with demonstrations, demonstrations, riots and civil wars demanding free and decent elections.
  • 2011
  • March 11: The 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami and subsequent Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in Japan killed 15,899 people.
    April 29: An estimated two billion people watched the wedding of Prince William, Duke of Cambridge and Catherine Middleton at Westminster Abbey in London.
    May 2: Al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden, who was responsible for developing the plan for the 9/11 attacks, is killed by United’s SEAL Team 6 (DEVGRU) in a raid on his compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan US Navy killed.
    July 10: Britain’s biggest tabloid, News of the World, closes after 168 years of publication due to the 2009 phone hacking scandal.
    July 14: South Sudan becomes a member of the United Nations after the January 2011 independence referendum.
    July 22: Anders Behring Breivik is responsible for two terrorist attacks, the first was the bombing of government buildings in central Oslo, the second the mass shooting at an orphanage on the island of Utya. It was the deadliest attack in Norway since World War II, killing 77 and wounding 319.
    September 17: The Occupy movement, an international protest movement against social and economic inequality, takes shape. Inspired in part by the Arab Spring, it was one of the first major global protest movements of the social media age.
    October 20: Deposed dictator Muammar Gaddafi is captured and killed by the Libyan National Liberation Army during the Libyan Civil War.
    October 31: Dilma Rousseff is elected Brazil’s first female president. She held the presidency until her impeachment and impeachment on August 31, 2016.
    November 16: Longtime Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi resigns amid public outcry, financial crisis and sex scandal.
    December 15: The Iraq war officially ends.
    December 17: Kim Jong-il, North Korea’s supreme leader, dies on December 17. His son Kim Jong-un comes to power in the country.
  • 2012
  • January 12: In January 2012, civil unrest broke out in Romania over the introduction of a new healthcare reform law, but also the unpopularity of the Băsescu-backed Boc government. The unrest continued until Victor Ponta resigned amid the fire at the Colectiv nightclub in November 2015.
    11-12 September: In Benghazi, Libya, a coordinated attack on two US government facilities is carried out by members of the Islamist militant group Ansar al-Sharia.
    November 15 Xi Jinping becomes General Secretary of the Chinese Communist Party, becoming China’s supreme leader after Hu Jintao.
    December 10: Séléka rebels seize power in the Central African Republic, overthrow the president and government and start a civil war.

Pope Francis

  • two thousand thirteen
  • January 11: France intervenes with its army in the conflict in northern Mali and defeats the Islamists who have taken control of the country.
    February 25 Park Geun-hye becomes the first woman elected President of South Korea.
    February 28: Pope Benedict XVI. resigns as the first pope since 1415. Benedict receives the title of Pope Emeritus. At the papal conclave that followed, Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Argentina was elected pope on March 13, becoming the first Latin American pope. Bergoglio takes the name of Pope Francis.
    March 5: Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez dies of prostate cancer and is replaced by Nicolás Maduro.
    March 21: Kurdish leader Abdullah Öcalan is convicted of ending an armed uprising against Turkey.
    April 8: British politician and first woman Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher dies at the age of 87 from a stroke.
    July 1: Croatia becomes the 28th member of the European Union.
    Iran allowed international inspections of its nuclear policy in exchange for the lifting of sanctions and the right to produce small amounts of low-enriched uranium, marking a clear new policy for Iran towards the United Nations under President Hassan Rouhani.
    September 14 Syria avoids US intervention on its territory during the Syrian Civil War and accepts the destruction of its entire chemical weapons arsenal.
    November: China declares an “Air Defense Identification Zone” in the East China Sea, including the Senkaku Islands, an archipelago held by Japan but claimed by both Japan and China, and the Socotra Reef owned by both China and China also claimed by South Korea. Korea.
    December 5: South Africa’s civil and political leader, Nelson Mandela, dies of natural causes at the age of 95.
    December 15: Civil war erupts in South Sudan.

UkraineEuromaidanThe European way of Ukraine

Donetsk

  • 2013-2014-A
  • Political crisis in Thailand
  • broke out and the government declared
  • martial law
  • Right later.
  • 2014
  • February 22: Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych is ousted amid the Euromaidan revolution. The Russian Federation subsequently annexed Crimea, and the “low-intensity” war between the Ukrainian government and Russian-backed separatists began in Donbass.
    May 26: Narendra Modi becomes India’s 14th Prime Minister with a clear majority.
    July 8 – August 26: Israel, tensions between Hamas in Gaza and the State of Israel rise again. Hamas fired hundreds of rockets at civilian towns in Israel, and the IDF retaliated, conducting airstrikes in Gaza for more than a month, with heavy casualties on both sides.
    July 17: Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, a civilian airliner, is shot down over pro-Russian separatist-held territory in eastern Ukraine.
    18 September: Scotland votes to remain part of the UK in its 2014 independence referendum.
    September to October: During the Syrian civil war, the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant terrorist group emerge and seize areas in northern Iraq and Syria near the border with Turkey. The United States led a coalition of more than 30 countries to defeat ISIL. Meanwhile, Russia leads a coalition with Syria, Iraq and Iran, and Russian military action began on September 30, 2015.
    October 31: In Burkina Faso, President Blaise Compaoré resigns amid widespread protests ending his 27-year term.
    November 16: In Romania, Klaus Iohannis wins the November 2014 elections, becoming the first Romanian president from an ethnic minority.
    December 17: US President Barack Obama and Cuban President Raúl Castro announce the start of the process to normalize relations between Cuba and the United States, ending 54 years of hostilities between the nations. Meanwhile, on July 20, 2015, with full diplomatic ties, the embassies of both countries were opened after 5 decades.

Europe’s 2015 Migration Crisis

  • 2015
  • January 7: Two gunmen, brothers Saïd and Chérif Kouachi, commit a mass murder at the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, killing 12 people. After the attack, about two million people, including more than 40 world leaders, gathered in Paris for a national unity demonstration, and 3.7 million people took part in demonstrations across the country. The phrase Je suis Charlie has become a popular slogan of support at protests and on social media.
    March 23: Singaporean politician and first Prime Minister of Singapore, Lee Kuan Yew, dies at the age of 91.
    End of the year: In China, the Communist Party announces the end of the one-child policy after 35 years.
    June 26: The US Supreme Court rules in Obergefell v. Hodges that same-sex couples have a constitutional right to marry.
    During the “2015 European Migrant Crisis”, some 1.3 million people, particularly refugees from the wars in Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan, came to seek asylum and caused significant political movement within the European Union. Germany finally accepted the majority of the asylum seekers.
    July 14 Iran and P5-1 (China, France, Russia, UK and US, Germany) agree on final terms of joint comprehensive plan of action regarding their nuclear program.
    November 13: ISIL claims responsibility for the November 2015 Paris attacks. Many people were killed and injured in the incident.
    November 24 Turkey shoots down a Russian Sukhoi Su-24M fighter jet. This is the first instance of a NATO member destroying a Russian plane since the Sui Ho Dam attack (during the Korean War).
    November 30-December 12: During the United Nations Climate Change Summit, 193 countries agreed on a process to reduce carbon emissions from 2020.

coupRecep Tayyip Erdogan

  • 2016
  • June 5: Hillary Clinton is nominated by the Democratic Party as the United States presidential nominee, becoming the first woman to be nominated for president by a major party.
    June 12: In Orlando, Florida, Omar Mateen, a 29-year-old security guard, kills 49 people and injures 53 others in a terrorist attack at Pulse, a gay nightclub.
    23 June: The United Kingdom decides to leave the European Union in its June 2016 referendum.
    July 13: After 6 years at the helm, British politician and Prime Minister David Cameron resigns and is replaced by Theresa May, the UK’s second female Prime Minister.
    15-16 July: A coup is carried out in Turkey against state institutions, including but not limited to the government and President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan. The effort was spearheaded by a faction within the Turkish Armed Forces that organized into the Homeland Peace Council.
  • November 8th:
  • donald trump
  • was elected the 45th President of the United States, defeated
  • Hillary Clinton
  • .
  • 2017
  • 21-22 January: Millions of people across the United States and around the world take part in the Women’s March to protest the inauguration of Donald Trump.
    January 27: US President Donald Trump signs an executive order restricting travel and immigration from seven Muslim-majority countries. The order was blocked by US federal courts; Second, Trump’s corresponding order was also blocked by the federal courts. The second block of injunctions was partially overturned by the Supreme Court in June. The Supreme Court said it would review the order in October.
    April 6: In response to a suspected chemical weapons attack on a rebel-held city, the US military fired 59 Tomahawk cruise missiles at Shayrat Air Force Base in Syria.
    17-18 August: 2017 Barcelona attacks, a terrorist attack on more than 100 people in Barcelona, ​​Spain, killing 13 and injuring many more.
    October 27: Catalonia declares its independence from Spain,[42] but the Catalan Republic is not recognized by the Spanish government or any other sovereign state. [43]
  • 2018 –
  • China
  • ‘S
  • National People’s Congress
  • approve a
  • constitutional amendment
  • that removed
  • term limitation
  • for myself
  • Leader
  • , grant
  • Xi Jinping
  • Status of “
  • leadership for life
  • “. Xi is
  • General Secretary of the Chinese Communist Party
  • (
  • De facto leader
  • ).

Xi JinpingLeaderfor life

March for our livesParkland, FL

  • 2018
  • March 24: In more than 900 cities around the world, people take part in demonstrations against gun violence and mass shootings, demanding stricter gun control for Our Lives, a student-led protest in response to the Stoneman Douglas High School shooting in March Parkland, Florida in February.
    May 9: The opposition-led Pakatan Harapan coalition led by former Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad wins a majority in Malaysia’s parliament, ending the 61-year rule of the Barisan Nasional coalition since its inception in 1957.
    May 19: Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s wedding takes place at St. George’s Chapel in England, with an estimated global audience of 1.9 billion people.
    June 12: President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un attend the Singapore Summit, the first face-to-face meeting between the two countries’ leaders.
    October 28: Jair Bolsonaro is elected Brazil’s 38th president after he was stabbed and operated on three times during the campaign.
  • 2019
  • January 10: Venezuela finds itself in a presidential crisis after disputed results of the 2018 Venezuelan presidential election led to Juan Guaidó being declared incumbent president against Nicolás Maduro.
    27-28 February: President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un meet at the 2019 North Korea-US Summit in Hanoi, Vietnam.
    March 13 School shooting in Suzano: At a school in Suzano, São Paulo, Brazil, two former students kill eight people and injure eleven others before committing suicide.
    March, 15:
    Christchurch mosque shootings: Australian terrorist Brenton Harrison Tarrant kills 51 and injures 40 at two mosques in New Zealand.
    More than 2 million people in Hong Kong began protesting the proposed law on extradition to China.
    March 23: Territory of terrorist organization Islamic State in Syria collapses during Syrian civil war. After years of global repulsion, the extremist group has morphed from a pro-state to an insurgent force, as it still has offices and influence in regions of the world.
    April 30: Emperor Akihito abdicates the throne, the first abdication by a Japanese king in almost two centuries. The abdication ends Japan’s Heisei era and ushers in the Reiwa era with the accession of the new Emperor Naruhito on May 1st.
    July 16: The European Parliament elects Ursula von der Leyen as the new President of the European Commission.
    July 24: Boris Johnson becomes Prime Minister of the United Kingdom after defeating Jeremy Hunt in a leadership contest to succeed Theresa May.
    10 December: Sanna Marin becomes the world’s youngest acting prime minister at 34 after being elected leader of Finland’s Social Democratic Party.
    December 18: President Donald Trump is impeached by the United States House of Representatives.
    December 31: China reports first known COVID-19 case in Wuhan; The disease will rapidly evolve into a global pandemic over the next three months. [44] [45]

The years 2020[Editor]

George Floyd protestedPandemic caused by covid-19

[forty six]

Joe BidenPresidents of States

[47]

  • year 2020
  • January 3: A US drone strike at Baghdad International Airport kills Iranian General Qasem Soleimani and Iraqi paramilitary leader Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis. Five days later, Iran carried out retaliatory strikes on US bases in Iraq, while Ukraine International Airlines Flight 752 was shot down by the IRGC after being mistaken for a cruise missile.
    January 31: Great Britain becomes the first member state to leave the European Union.
    March: Start of the global pandemic of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The pandemic saw widespread economic disruption, including a stock market crash.
    May 26: Protests over the killing of George Floyd erupt in hundreds of cities across the United States and around the world. Derek Chauvin, the officer who killed Floyd, is eventually convicted of two counts of murder and one count of manslaughter after the protest.
    June 30: China passes the controversial Hong Kong National Security Law, allowing China to crack down on opposition to Beijing at home and abroad.
    August 11: Kamala Harris is nominated by the Democratic Party for vice president of the United States, becoming the first African-American, first Asian-American, and third woman vice president to run for office in a major party.
    August 18: A mutiny at a military base by soldiers of the Malian Armed Forces turns into a coup d’état. President Ibrahim Boubacar Keïta and Prime Minister Boubou Cissé were forced to resign, along with other senior government and military officials.
    September 4: Kosovo and Serbia announce that they will normalize economic relations.
    Israel, Sudan, Morocco, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain have signed an agreement officially normalizing diplomatic relations.
    Azerbaijan launched a successful military campaign against Armenian forces to retake the disputed Nagorno-Karabakh region. Turkey sent Syrian mercenaries to help with this effort, and Russia ended the conflict by sending peacekeepers.
    November 3: Joe Biden is elected 46th President of the United States and Kamala Harris is elected Vice President. Biden is the oldest person elected to a first term.
    November 15: Kyrgyz President Sooronbay Jeenbekov resigns after weeks of mass protests following October 2020 parliamentary elections; Opposition leader Sadyr Japarov took over as acting President and Prime Minister of Kyrgyzstan.
    Sudanese Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok and Sudan People’s Liberation Movement North (SPLM-N) leader Abdelaziz al-Hilu sign an agreement to transform the country into a secular state.
    A United Nations Human Rights Council fact-finding mission officially accused the Venezuelan government of crimes against humanity, including murder, torture and violence against the political opposition, and has been missing since 2014. Including President Nicolás Maduro and other senior Venezuelan officials in the charges.
    France, Germany and the UK have issued a joint note to the United Nations rejecting China’s claims to the South China Sea and supporting the Philippines’ ruling against China that violated historic rights to the Nine-Dash Line against the UN Convention on the law violated by the sea. However, the statement said they “take no position” on “territorial sovereignty”.
  • year 2021
  • Jan. 6: Pro-Trump rioters storm the US Capitol, disrupting US President-elect Joe Biden’s congressional certification. Trump was indicted a second time a week later for his role in the Storming case, making him the first US federal official to be indicted more than once and the first president to be tried after his term expires.
    February 1: A coup in Myanmar removes Aung San Suu Kyi from power and restores military rule. [48]
    February 18: NASA’s Mars 2020 mission (with the Perseverance drone and Ingenuity helicopter) lands on Mars in Jezero Crater after a seven-month journey. [49]
    April 30-June 13: A pilgrimage to Lag BaOmer, rising violence during the 2021 Israeli-Palestinian crisis, and ongoing issues with the COVID-19 pandemic in Israel ahead of the 2021 Israeli presidential election. In the midst of the elections Naftali Bennett and Yair Lapid agreed on a Bennett-led rotating government to unseat Benjamin Netanyahu as prime minister as the crisis month was the peak of scandals and corruption, including financial crime charges, in Netanyahu’s long-term record.
    July 7: The President of Haiti, Jovenel Moïse, is assassinated in a midnight attack by unknown mercenaries.
    August 15: The Taliban regain control of Kabul after US and Republican government forces fled Afghanistan, marking the end of the war in Afghanistan after nearly 20 years. [50]
    November 30: Barbados becomes a republic by replacing Elizabeth II as Queen and Sandra Mason as President as head of state.
  • 2022
  • February 24: After a long military build-up, Russia launches an invasion of Ukraine.

Politics, War and States[Editor]

International relations since 1989List of Wars: 2003 – Present

Wladimir PutinMr George W BushMoscow

G827th G8 SummitGenoaItaly

New lands and territorial changes[Editor]

Some territories gained independence in the 21st century. This is a list of sovereign states that have gained and are recognized by their independence in the 21st centuryU.N..

Declaration of IndependenceKosovo

  • East Timor
  • (East Timor)
  • [51]
  • on May 20, 2002.
  • Montenegro
  • on June 3, 2006.
  • Serbia
  • on June 3, 2006.
  • South Sudan
  • on July 9, 2011.

These countries have gained sovereignty through government reforms.

  • Union of Comoros
  • on December 23, 2001,

ThatUnion of ComorossubstituteFederal Islamic Republic of Comoros

  • The Islamic transitional state of Afghanistan
  • on July 13, 2002,

ThatThe Islamic transitional state of AfghanistansubstituteIslamic State of Afghanistan.

  • State Union of Serbia and Montenegro
  • on February 4, 2003.

ThatState Union of Serbia and MontenegrosubstituteFederal Republic of Yugoslavia.

  • Islamic Republic of Afghanistan
  • on December 7, 2004,

ThatIslamic Republic of AfghanistansubstituteThe Islamic transitional state of Afghanistan

  • Federal Democratic Republic of Nepal
  • on May 28, 2008.

ThatFederal Democratic Republic of NepalsubstituteKingdom of Nepal.

  • Libya’s National Transitional Council
  • on October 20, 2011.

ThatLibya’s National Transitional CouncilsubstituteGreat Socialist People’s Libyan Arab Jamahiriya.

  • State of Libya
  • on 08/08/2012.

ThatState of LibyasubstituteLibya’s National Transitional Council.

  • The Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan
  • on August 15, 2021.

ThatThe Islamic Emirate of AfghanistansubstituteIslamic Republic of Afghanistan.

These territories have declared independence and guaranteed relative autonomy, but are recognized by only a few UN member states:

  • Kosovo
  • on February 17, 2008. (
  • partially recognized
  • )
  • South Ossetia
  • on August 26, 2008. (
  • partially recognized
  • )
  • Abkhazia
  • on August 26, 2008. (
  • partially recognized
  • )
  • Donetsk People’s Republic
  • and
  • People’s Republic of Lugansk
  • in May 2014. (
  • partially recognized
  • ) was founded in by separatists from Ukraine
  • War in Donbass
  • . The states were allied for such a short time as
  • Novorossiya
  • , was disbanded in 2015.

These areas have declared their independence and secured relative autonomy, but they are not recognized by anyone:

  • The Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant
  • in June 2014. Already have
  • occupied most of Iraq, Syria and Libya
  • . It
  • be considered
  • terrorist organization and no longer has any significant territorial control.
  • Republic of Catalonia
  • on October 27, 2017.
  • The Catalan Parliament
  • claimed to be the Catalan Republic but
  • Kingdom of Spain
  • did not realize this and for a time enforced the rule head on. (See
  • Catalan independence referendum 2017
  • and
  • Spanish Constitutional Crisis 2017–2018
  • )
  • Southern Transitional Council
  • in March 2017. Claim and restore much of the southern part of Yemen
  • South Yemen
  • .

These territories were annexed by a sovereign state, an act recognized by few United Nations member states:

  • Crimea
  • Annex
  • from Ukraine to the Russian Federation on March 18, 2014.

These terrorists were left to another country:

  • The territories occupied by Armenia around Nagorno-Karabakh
  • and
  • Lachin Corridor
  • , abandoned by
  • Armenia
  • arrive
  • Azerbaijani
  • At the end
  • Nagorno-Karabakh War 2020
  • .
  • The country of India – Bangladesh
  • , was traded between the two countries in 2015.

science and technology[Editor]

space exploration[Editor]

curiositylounger

Mars

New Horizons

  • 2001 –
  • Dennis Tito
  • be the first
  • space tourism
  • by paying $19 million to come on board
  • International Space Station
  • .
  • 2003 –
  • Disaster of the Space Shuttle Columbia
  • February 1st.
  • 2003 – Events
  • China’s space program
  • debut first
  • space crew
  • ,
  • Shenzhen 5
  • , on October 15. This makes China the third country in the world to have domestic crew capacities.
  • 2004 –
  • Mars Rover
  • landed on
  • Mars
  • ;
  • chance
  • Discover evidence that an area
  • Mars
  • was once covered with water.
  • 2004 –
  • SpaceshipOne
  • make the first privately funded
  • human space
  • , June 21st.
  • 2005 – Events
  • Huygens
  • exploration of the earth
  • titanium
  • , Saturn’s largest moon, January 14.
  • 2006 – Events
  • New Horizons
  • The probe was launched on January 19 to Pluto.
  • 2006 –
  • The Pluto
  • reclassified from a
  • planet
  • to one
  • dwarf planet
  • , left the solar system with eight planets.
  • 2007 – China launches its first lunar mission
  • Chang’e 1
  • , on October 24th.
  • 2008 – India launches its first lunar mission
  • Chandrayaan-1
  • including the remote sensing orbiter and impactor on October 22, 2008. India was the third country to plant a flag on the moon.
  • 2008 –
  • China’s space program
  • launch the third manned spaceflight with the first three manned crews and conduct the first spacewalk, making China the third country to do so after Russia and the United States,
  • Shenzhen 7
  • , on 25.09.
  • 2008 –
  • Phoenix
  • Water ice discovered on Mars.
  • 2009 –
  • Iran
  • debut first
  • satellite
  • ,
  • Omid
  • , on February 2nd.
  • 2011 –
  • NASA
  • final shuttle retirement,
  • Atlantis
  • , marking the end of its three-decade-long space shuttle program.
  • 2012 –
  • SpaceX
  • The goods have been successfully sent to
  • International Space Station
  • .
  • 2012 – NASA landed successfully
  • Curious explorer
  • on the surface of
  • Mars
  • , on 6.8.
  • 2014 – from India
  • Mars Orbital Mission
  • , the country’s first attempt to send a spacecraft to Mars, successfully entered orbit on September 24, making India the fourth country in the world to have achieved this goal.
  • 2014 – Events
  • European Space Agency
  • Robot Spaceship
  • Philae
  • successfully landed on Comet 67P, the comet’s first-ever landing.
  • 2015 – July 14, NASA’s
  • New Horizons
  • Spaceship flew by first
  • The Pluto
  • , on a mission to photograph and collect data on its planetary system. To date, no spacecraft has performed such a mission compared to Earth.
  • 2015 – On September 28, NASA announces that liquid water has been found
  • Mars
  • .
  • [52]
  • 2015 –
  • SpaceX
  • taking off and landing
  • falcon 9
  • into orbit on December 21, becoming the first reusable rocket to do so.
  • 2016 –
  • SpaceX
  • first orbital rocket landing, a
  • CRS-8
  • , on a sea-based drone platform on April 8.
  • 2016 – July 4th, NASA
  • Juno
  • Spacecraft is sent into polar orbit to study the planet
  • Jupiter
  • .
  • [53]
  • 2016 – July 26 year
  • 2. Sun Pulse
  • flew around the world as the first solar-powered airplane.
  • 2016 – On 08/24/2016
  • an exoplanet the size of Earth
  • to discover around
  • Proxima Centauri
  • , 4.2 light-years distant, potentially habitable.
  • 2016 – September 8th, NASAs
  • ORIRIS-Rex
  • Spacecraft launched as first asteroid sample return mission to collect samples
  • Bennu
  • .
  • 2019 – On January 3, probe in China
  • Chang’an 4
  • became the first man-made object to land on
  • other side of the moon
  • .
  • [54]
  • 2019 – NASA ends 15 years
  • casual seeker
  • Abandonment after failing to wake the rover from sleep.
  • [55]
  • 2019 –
  • Israeli
  • debut first
  • spaceship
  • ,
  • Beresheet
  • , there
  • moon
  • on April 7; After two months of travel, the spacecraft failed to land and crashed on the lunar surface, making Israel the seventh country to orbit the moon.
  • 2019 – The first picture of
  • supermassive black hole
  • within the galaxy
  • messier 87
  • caught by
  • Event Horizon Telescope
  • .
  • [56]
  • 2021 –
  • NASA
  • ‘S
  • Stamina Explorer
  • , with the Ingenuity helicopter, landed successfully
  • Mars
  • .

physics[Editor]

  • 2003 –
  • WMAP
  • observation of
  • cosmic microwave background
  • .
  • 2010 – Events
  • Large Hadron Collider
  • The first high-energy collisions took place in March 2010.
  • 2012 – Physicists discovered
  • Higgs boson
  • based on the collisions at the Large Hadron Collider on July 4th. It’s the latest particle discovered in the
  • standard model
  • .
  • [57]
  • 2016 – February 11 year
  • LIGO
  • Announcing the discovery of explosions
  • gravitational waves
  • created by the cosmic collision of
  • black hole
  • and was predicted by
  • Albert Einstein
  • 100 years ago.

mathematics[Editor]

  • 2002 –
  • Grigory Perelman
  • has uploaded the first of a series of prints
  • arXiv
  • , in which he demonstrated
  • The Poincaré conjecture
  • , the first of
  • Edition of the Millennium Prize
  • be resolved.
  • two thousand thirteen –
  • Yitang Zhang
  • publish an article in
  • Chronicles of Mathematics
  • established the first finite limit on at least
  • Distance between consecutive prime numbers
  • this is achieved infinitely often.

biotechnology and medicine[Editor]

Chronicle of medicine and medical technology 2000 – todayMedicine in the 2010s

  • 2003 – Completed
  • Human Gene Protection Project
  • 2005 – The first part was a success
  • face transplant
  • Made in France.
  • 2006 –
  • Australian of the Year
  • physician
  • Ian Frazer
  • develop a
  • vaccination
  • because that
  • cervical cancer
  • .
  • 2007 – Visual prosthesis (bionic eye) Argus II.
  • 2008 – Japanese scientists create an artificial form
  • DNS
  • .
  • 2008 – Laurent Lantieri performs the first full face transplant.
  • 2012 – The first successful full face transplant in Turkey.
  • 2012 – Many doubts are raised
  • statins
  • Medicine.
  • 2013 – The first test tube grown kidney in the United States
  • 2013 – First human liver grown from stem cells in Japan.

telecommunications[Editor]

Steve JobsIphonesmartphone

Thatdigital revolutioncontinued into the early 21st century with cell phone useGlobal internet usageis growing massively and becoming available to more people with more applications and faster speeds.

Internet users worldwide [58]

user
2005
2010
2017
2019 [59]

world population [60]

6.5 billion won

6.9 billion won

7.4 billion won

7.75 billion VND

Worldwide

16%

30%

48%

53.6%

In the developing countries

8th%

21%

41.3%

47%

In the developed world

51%

sixty-seven%

81%

86.6%

social networkemerged in the mid-2000s as a popular means of social communication, replacing much of the function ofE-mail,newsandinstant messagesService.Twitter,Facebook,youtube,InstagramandSnapchatare all major examples of social media becoming more widespread. The usage ofwebcamsandfront cameraon PCs and related devices and services such aschat app,Start, andFaceTimedidvideo callsandTV affairPopular. Their use increased dramatically over timePandemic caused by covid-19.

civil unrest[Editor]

December 2001 Riots in Argentina

Georgian protests in 2007Mikhail Saakashvili

Tahrir Square

Madrid

Hong Kong protests 2019–20

Chilean protests 2019–2020

  • The 2001 G8 protests in Genoa
  • December 2001 Riots in Argentina
  • Gujarat riots in 2002
  • Protest against the Iraq war
  • Bolivian gas conflict
  • 2003 Maldives riots
  • 2004–2005 Orange Revolution in Ukraine
  • riots in Belfast in 2005
  • 2005 civil unrest in France
  • 2006–2008 protests in Lebanon
  • Saffron Revolution
  • Georgian protests in 2007
  • Armenian Presidential Election Rally 2008
  • 2008 riots in Tibet
  • Iceland’s 2009 financial crisis protests
  • The 2009 G-20 London summit protests
  • 2009-2010 election campaign in Iran
  • 2010 political protests in Thailand
  • Kyrgyz revolution of 2010
  • Protests against the G-20 summit in Toronto 2010
  • British student protests 2010
  • Protests in Greece 2010–2012
  • Arabic spring
  • The Tunisian Revolution
  • Egyptian Revolution 2011
  • Protests following the 2011 Egyptian revolution
  • Impact of the Arab Spring
  • Magallanes protests of 2011
  • Iran’s 2011 protests
  • Libyan Civil War 2011
  • Syrian Civil War
  • Northern Ireland riots 2011
  • 2011 Anti-austerity protests in the UK
  • Anti-austerity movement in Portugal
  • “worker” Spain
  • 2011 riots in England
  • Chilean Student Demonstration 2011–13
  • 2011 Israel Social Justice Rally
  • “Occupy” protests around the world
  • Russian protests 2011–2013
  • Bersih Rally 3.0
  • Soy yoghurt 132
  • Belfast City Hall hoists protest flags
  • Iraqi protests 2012–2013
  • Gezi Park protested
  • 2013 protests in Brazil
  • June 2013 Egyptian protests
  • 2013 Muzaffarnagar riots
  • Thai Political Crisis 2013–2014
  • Euromaidan
  • Social protests in Italy in 2013
  • Little India riot 2013
  • Ukrainian revolution 2014
  • 2014 riots in Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Protests in Venezuela (2014–present)
  • In 2014, Pakistan protested against the government
  • 2014 Ferguson unstable
  • Hong Kong protests in 2014
  • Baltimore protests in 2015
  • 2015–18 protests in Iraq
  • Protests in Lebanon 2015
  • Protest against Donald Trump
  • Nuit debut
  • 2016 attempted coup in Turkey
  • 2016–17 South Korean protests
  • Demonstration of the Dakota Access pipeline
  • Protests in Romania 2017–2019
  • 2017 Belarusian protests
  • Russian protests 2017–2018
  • Spanish Constitutional Crisis 2017–2018
  • Unite the right rally
  • Honduras protests 2017–2018
  • Nicaraguan protests 2018–2019
  • Yellow Vest Movement
  • Serbian protests (2018–present)
  • Sudanese Revolution
  • Armenian Revolution 2018
  • 2018-2021 protests in Haiti
  • Protests in Algeria 2019–2020
  • Hong Kong protests 2019–20
  • Attempted insurgency in Venezuela in 2019
  • Protests in Papua in 2019
  • 2019 Egyptian protests
  • 2019–2020 protests in Iraq
  • 2019 Ecuadorian protests
  • Catalan protests 2019
  • Chilean protests 2019–2020
  • 2019–20 Lebanon protests
  • Protests in Bolivia 2019
  • Protests and riots in Indonesia in 2019
  • Iran protests 2019–20
  • Maltese protests in 2019
  • Protests in Colombia 2019-2020
  • Defy the Civil Rights Amendment Act
  • 2020–2021 protests in Thailand
  • 2020–2021 US race riots
  • Belarusian protests in 2020
  • 2020–2021 Serbian protests
  • 2020–2021 protests in Bulgaria
  • 2020–2021 Indian Farmers Rally
  • End the SARS protests
  • Protests in Poland in 2020
  • Peru’s 2020 protests
  • US election protests 2020-2021
  • 2020–2021 Armenian protests
  • Protests in Guatemala in 2020
  • 2021 riots over Dutch curfew
  • 2021 Russian protests
  • 2021 protests in Myanmar
  • 2021 the Senegalese protest
  • Paraguayan protest in 2021
  • 2021 protests in Colombia
  • 2021 riots in South Africa
  • 2022 protests in Kazakhstan

catastrophe[Editor]

natural disaster[Editor]

Ao NangThailand

City of New Orleans, LouisianaKatrina bag

2000s

  • 2001 Gujarat earthquake
  • – An earthquake in Gujarat, India on January 26, 2001 killed about 20,000 people.
  • January 2001 earthquake in El Salvador
  • – The 7.9 magnitude earthquake in El Salvador struck the country on January 13, 2001, causing a devastating landslide that killed hundreds, injured thousands and left many homeless. A month later, on February 13, 2001, the country suffered a second earthquake – 6.7
  • 2003 European heat wave
  • – Around 70,000 people died across Europe during the long summer heatwave.
  • 2003 Bam earthquake
  • – A
  • earthquake
  • in
  • bam
  • ,
  • Iran
  • on December 27, 2003, which killed more than 26,000 people.
  • Hurricane Jeanne in 2004
  • – More than 3,000 people were killed by
  • Storm Jeanne
  • in
  • Haitian
  • in September 2004.
  • 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami
  • – On December 26, 2004, a massive undersea earthquake resulted in a massive tsunami that struck Southeast Asia, killing about 230,000 people.
  • Hurricane Katrina in 2005
  • – Hurricanes killed 1,836 people in southeastern Louisiana and Mississippi (most in
  • New Orleans
  • ) and South Florida. A significant part of the city, most of it below sea level, was flooded. Damage totaled $81.5 billion, making Katrina the costliest tropical cyclone ever recorded in the United States.
  • 2005 Kashmir earthquake
  • – A
  • Earthquake in Kashmir
  • on October 8, 2005, killing at least 74,500 people in India and
  • Pakistan
  • .
  • Cyclone Nargis in 2008
  • – resulted in catastrophic floods that killed over 100,000 and left millions homeless.
  • 2008 Sichuan Earthquake
  • – A 7.9-8.0 magnitude earthquake struck Sichuan, China on May 12, 2008, killing 68,712 people and leaving 17,921 missing.
  • 2009
  • Black Saturday forest fires
  • – The Black Saturday fires are a series of fires that broke out or burned on and around Saturday 7 February 2009 across Victoria, Australia. living from a forest fire; 173 people died and 414 were injured.
  • The 2009 L’Aquila earthquake
  • – A 6.3 magnitude earthquake struck nearby
  • L’Aquila
  • (
  • Italy
  • ) on April 6, 2009, one of the worst in Italian history. 308 people have died and more than 65,000 people have lost their homes.
  • 2009 flu pandemic
  • – The worldwide outbreak of
  • Influenza A virus of subtype H1N1
  • spread around the world and formed a pandemic in June 2009.

The 2010s

Hurricane IreneInternational Space Station

Hurricane MariaDominika

  • 2010 Haiti earthquake
  • – At least 230,000 people were killed in Haiti after the massive earthquake on January 12, 2010. Three million people became homeless.
  • Earthquake 2010 in Chile
  • – A massive 8.8 magnitude earthquake struck Chile’s central coast on February 27, 2010.
  • 2010 Yushu earthquake
  • – A massive 6.9 magnitude earthquake struck the Yushu region of China in Qinghai near Tibet on April 14, 2010, killing more than 2,200 people.
  • 2010 eruption of Eyjafjallajökull
  • – A huge plume of ash created by the eruption of Iceland’s volcano
  • Eyjafjallajokull
  • , on April 14, 2010, grounded flights throughout North West Europe. Scientists began recording volcanic activity there in 2009, which increased through March 2010, culminating in a second eruption in April.
  • 2010 floods in Pakistan
  • – Launched in July 2010 after a heavy record
  • monsoon
  • Rain. That
  • Khyber Pakhtunkhwa
  • province of
  • Pakistan
  • most affected. At least 1,600 people were killed, thousands were left homeless and more than 13 million people were affected.
  • [sixty one]
  • [62]
  • [63]
  • [sixty-four]
  • [65]
  • Estimates by rescue service workers assume up to 3,000 fatalities.
  • [66]
  • 2011 Queensland floods
  • – Started in December 2010 mainly at
  • Queensland
  • . The flood forced thousands of people to evacuate. At least 200,000 people have been affected by the floods. Flooding continued in Queensland in January 2011 and is expected to decrease
  • Australia’s GDP
  • is about 30 billion Australian dollars.
  • Cyclone Yasi
  • – A Category 5 (Australian Scale) cyclone hit North Queensland with winds up to 290 km/h (197 mph), devastating residents of North Queensland.
  • February
  • The 2011 Christchurch Earthquake
  • – 185 people died in New Zealand after a magnitude 6.3 earthquake struck Christchurch on 22 February 2011, making it the second deadliest natural disaster in New Zealand after the earthquake
  • The Hawke Bay earthquake of 1931
  • .
  • 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami
  • – On March 11, 2011, a catastrophic magnitude 9.0 undersea earthquake struck off the east coast.
  • Japan
  • , the largest tsunami in the country’s history and caused a massive tsunami that killed 15,894 people; it activates too
  • Fukushima I nuclear accident
  • . The combined cost of the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear accident was $235 billion, making it the costliest natural disaster of all time.
  • Great Breakout 2011
  • – Considered to be the deadliest tornado outbreak ever recorded and named
  • Great Breakout 2011
  • , a catastrophic tornado that struck April 25–28. April erupted, affected
  • South America
  • and killed more than 330 people, most of whom went back and forth
  • Alabama
  • . Damage is estimated at at least $10 billion.
  • 2011 Joplin tornado
  • – On May 22, 2011, a terrible EF5 tornado occurred
  • Joplin, Missouri
  • It claimed 159 lives, making it the deadliest tornado to hit the United States since 1947.
  • Tropical Cyclone Washi
  • – Known locally as Sendong, it caused catastrophic flooding
  • Filipino
  • island of
  • Mindanao
  • on the night of December 16, 2011. The hardest hits in
  • Cagayan de Oro
  • and
  • Iligan city
  • . Almost 1000 people were killed, most of them asleep, and the President
  • Benigno Aquino III
  • explain a
  • disaster situation
  • four days later.
  • Hurricane Sandy
  • – October 24-30, 2012 – kills at least 185 people in
  • Caribbean
  • ,
  • Bahamas
  • ,
  • United States of America
  • and
  • Canada
  • . Significant
  • the storm is coming
  • The damage caused major disruption along the east coast of the United States.
  • [sixty-seven]
  • [68]
  • [69]
  • Haiyan storm
  • 2013 – Kills more than 6,000 people in the center
  • Philippines
  • . Considered one of the strongest storms of all time, it caused extensive damage and loss of life in the Philippines, especially its islands.
  • Leyte
  • and
  • Samar
  • . After the storm, a global humanitarian effort began.
  • 2014 floods in Southeastern Europe
  • – Kill at least 80 people in
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • and
  • Serbia
  • . Floods have caused more than 2,000 landslides and extensively damaged towns and villages in the Balkans.
  • April 2015 earthquake in Nepal
  • – A 7.8 magnitude earthquake killed nearly 9,000 people, injured 22,000 others and left nearly 3 million homeless in central Nepal. The earthquake was so strong that it was felt in India, Pakistan and Bangladesh.
  • 2016 Taiwan earthquake
  • – The 6.4 magnitude earthquake left 117 dead, 550 injured and 4 missing. The earthquake led to the arrest of three executives at developer Weiguan on charges of professional negligence resulting in death.
  • August 2016 earthquake in central Italy
  • – Magnitude 6.2
  • earthquake
  • 299 people died and heavy damage
  • amatrice
  • ,
  • accumulators
  • and
  • Arquata del T Toronto
  • .

The years 2020

  • Unprecedented floods have killed millions and threaten starvation
  • Sudan
  • and
  • South Sudan
  • in 2020-2021.
  • [70]
  • [71]
  • That
  • Atlantic hurricane season 2020
  • , the most active regional season on record with a total of 30 named storms causing more than 400 deaths in parts of the United States,
  • Central America
  • and
  • Caribbean
  • .
  • At least 20 people were killed
  • 2021 Henan floods
  • In China, it is aggravated by after heavy rains (at least 20 °C per hour).
  • Storm In-fa
  • break existing records.
  • That
  • 2021 floods in Europe
  • killed more than 188 people and devastated Belgium, Germany, Austria, the Netherlands, Croatia, Switzerland, Italy and Luxembourg. The floods in Germany proved to be the deadliest since
  • North Sea flood 1962
  • .

Man Made Disaster[Editor]

  • On July 27, 2002, a
  • Sukhoi Su-27
  • fighter
  • problem
  • at a
  • air show
  • in
  • Ukraine
  • 77 people were killed and more than 100 injured, making it the worst airshow disaster in history.
  • On February 1, 2003, at the end of
  • STS-107
  • Mission,
  • Commute
  • Columbia
  • resolved during retry
  • End
  • Texas
  • , killing all seven astronauts on board.
  • That
  • Black Saturday forest fires
  • – the deadliest
  • Australian bushfires
  • story played out
  • Australian
  • status
  • of
  • Victoria
  • on February 7, 2009 in scorching weather conditions that resulted in 173 deaths, over 500 injuries and approximately 7,500 homeless. The fire broke out afterwards
  • Melbourne
  • recording
  • Highest temperature ever
  • (46.4 °C, 115 °F) of each capital city in Australia. Most fires are caused by dropped power lines, collisions, or intentional ignition.
  • April 10, 2010 the President of Poland
  • Lech Kaczyski
  • , his wife and 94 others, including dozens of government officials, were killed
  • a plane accident
  • .
  • On April 20, 2010, an explosion occurred
  • deep water horizon
  • Offshore
  • oil shore
  • , works in
  • Gulf of Mexico
  • on the coast of
  • Louisiana
  • , which killed 11 crew members and resulted in a fire that sank the rig and caused a widespread explosion
  • oil spill
  • [72]
  • could become one of the worst environmental disasters in
  • United States of America
  • Story.
  • [seventy-three]
  • On June 18, 2010, oceanographer John Kessler said the crude oil effluent from the well contained 40% methane, compared to about 5% found in conventional oil fields. Methane is a natural gas that can suffocate marine life and create “dead zones” where oxygen is depleted to the point where life cannot survive. “This is the strongest methane burst in modern human history,” Kessler said.
  • [74]
  • On June 20, an internal BP document released by Congress revealed that BP’s estimated flows since the landfill on June 20 have
  • [75]
  • [76]

pandemics and epidemics[Editor]

Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa

drug overdose

  • 2002-2004 –
  • Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome
  • (SARS) spread to many countries
  • 2002–04 SARS outbreak
  • .
  • 2009 –
  • Influenza A virus of subtype H1N1
  • spread around the world, become one
  • global pandemic
  • .
  • 2014 –
  • Ebola virus
  • spread to West Africa and caused the largest outbreak at the time with more than 20,000 cases. First cases reported outside of Africa.
  • 2019-present-A
  • worldwide pandemic
  • caused by
  • Virus SARS-CoV-2
  • occur. It leads to spread
  • company
  • and
  • economically
  • Interruption and early 2022 more than
  • 6 million dead
  • .
  • [77]
  • [78]

economy and industry[Editor]

  • That
  • Financial crisis in the late 2000s
  • because
  • Great Depression
  • , which lasted until the early 2010s.
  • In the early 2010s
  • Europe’s sovereign debt crisis
  • great influence on
  • European politics
  • and contribute and introduce to the power shift
  • savings belt
  • politics in different countries.
  • industrialized countries
  • accounts for 97% of global growth and
  • industrial
  • lead to a rapid increase in
  • BRIC
  • the economy and the weakening of the
  • American
  • hegemony
  • in the world economy.
  • That
  • Pandemic caused by covid-19
  • caused a global recession and forced many governments and economic sectors to invest heavily and restructure, particularly with the widespread introduction of
  • work remotely
  • .
  • Economic restructuring is being pursued in many economies due to its global nature
  • climate change
  • .

Sports[Editor]

football associationis the most popular sport worldwide withFootball World Cupis the most-watched football event. Other sports such as rugby, cricket, baseball, basketball, ice hockey, tennis and golf are popular worldwide. Inbaseball, Looktwenty20format and createIndian Premier Leaguehas led to changes in the nature of the sport. American swimmerMichael Phelpswon an Olympic record 8 gold medals2008 Summer Olympics.

Beijing2008 Summer Olympics

football association[Editor]

  • That
  • FIFA World Cup 2002
  • – host
  • Korea
  • and
  • Japan
  • – won by
  • Brazil
  • That
  • World Cup 2006
  • – host
  • Germany
  • – won by
  • Italy
  • That
  • FIFA World Cup 2010
  • – host
  • South Africa
  • – won by
  • Spain
  • That
  • World Cup 2014
  • – host
  • Brazil
  • – won by
  • Germany
  • That
  • World Cup 2018
  • – host
  • Russia
  • – won by
  • France

baseball[Editor]

  • After winning in 1999, the Australian cricket team won three of the Cricket World Cups between 2003 and 2019. Two of them, in 2003 and 2007, were consecutive.

soccer grid[Editor]

  • Inside
  • National Football League
  • , that
  • New England Patriots
  • was the dominant brand in the first two decades of the 21st century, winning 6
  • Super Bowl
  • from 2001 to 2018 and appeared in three more. head coach
  • Bill Belichick
  • and midfielder
  • brave cat
  • led the group for the duration, with Brady also leading the way
  • Tampa Bay Buccaneers
  • to the additional Super Bowl after the 2020 season. Other teams with multiple Super Bowl appearances during this period include
  • Philly Eagles
  • ,
  • Giants in New York
  • ,
  • Kansas City chief
  • ,
  • Seattle Seahawks football team
  • , and
  • Carolina Panther
  • . Alongside Brady, who has also won three
  • Associated Press NFL Most Valuable Player Award
  • (MVP), other highly recognized players are midfielders
  • Peyton Manning
  • , who has won 5 MVP awards, most in history and quarterback
  • Aaron Rodgers
  • who won three MVPs, who set an NFL record for the 2011 season
  • pedestrian ratings
  • . Players successfully attack in other positions, including wide receivers
  • Randy Moss
  • , who set the record for most turf hits in a season in 2007 with 23, the wide receiver
  • Michael Thomas
  • , who set the 2019 NFL record for most receptions in a season with 149, a close finish
  • Rob Gronkowski
  • , who became the first tight player to lead the league in touchdowns in 2011, returned
  • Adrian Peterson
  • , who in 2007, his rookie year, set the NFL’s all-time record for fastest pitches in a game with 296. One of the most important defensive players of the century is safety
  • Ed Reed
  • , who leads the league in three interceptions, midfielder
  • Ray Lewis
  • , who set a career goalscoring record in 2012 and is a midfielder
  • J.J. Watts
  • , who is the only player to have scored more than 20 goals in two different seasons.
  • In American language
  • college football
  • , this sport has seen its birth
  • College Football Tournament
  • , the first playoff for
  • NCAA Division I Football Bowl subdivision
  • , the highest level of college football in the United States. The series was dominated by two teams,
  • Clemson Tiger
  • and
  • Alabama Crimson Tide
  • , at least one of which has played in every playoff game since its inception in 2014 and collectively won all but one said championship. Before 2014, the method of determining the champion was complete
  • Bowl Championship Series
  • (BCS), a single championship game that attempts to compare the top two teams in the country by using a series of polls and computer rankings to select the top two. In the BCS era, the top teams were Alabama, which won three BCS championships, and
  • State of Florida
  • ,
  • LSU
  • , and
  • Oklahoma
  • , after winning two BCS championships.
  • Nick Saban
  • , who led both LSU and Alabama to win one and seven national championships, respectively, was the most dominant coach of his day while the quarterbacks dominated.
  • Heisman Trophy
  • , won 16 out of 20 in the first two decades of the 21st century Some controversy over athlete pay has dominated the sport, with the winner of the Heisman Trophy.
  • Reggie Bush
  • forced to return his prize for receiving improper benefits while maintaining his amateur status while officials and media continued to debate the possibility of paying athletes at all levels
  • college athletics
  • .
  • In
  • Canadian soccer
  • , the tournament that ushered in the 21st century, faced an uncertain financial future, suffering the setbacks of trying to win
  • Canadian soccer team in the United States
  • and had to sign large numbers of teams by the late 20th century. The league teetered between 8 and 9 teams when two different Ottawa-based franchises failed in the first decade of the 21st century. The league found stability in 2010’s 21st century, showing surprising parity between teams, with all nine teams appearing in at least one
  • gray cup
  • in 2000 and 2010, and only with
  • Montreal Alouettes
  • won back-to-back titles in those two decades, 2009 and 2010. full-back
  • Anthony Calvillo
  • The Alouettes was the face of the tournament in his career and won three times
  • Award for the best player
  • and set some passing records along the way.

golf[Editor]

  • That
  • Ryder Cup 2002
  • was won by Europe 15 and half for USA 12 and 12.
  • That
  • Ryder Cup 2004
  • Europe won 18 1/2 against USA 9 1/2.
  • That
  • Ryder Cup 2006
  • Europe won 18 ½ against USA 9 ½.
  • That
  • Ryder Cup 2008
  • won the US 16 and a half by 11:30 p.m. Europe.
  • That
  • Ryder Cup 2010
  • Europe won 14 1/2 against USA 13 1/2.
  • That
  • Ryder Cup 2012
  • Europe won 14 1/2 against USA 13 1/2.
  • That
  • Ryder Cup 2014
  • Europe won 16.5 against USA 11.5
  • That
  • Ryder Cup 2016
  • was won by the United States 17 and 11 by Europe.

sports car racing[Editor]

Supercar Championship

  • Dale Earnhardt
  • died after a fall on the last lap
  • Daytona 500
  • in February 2001.
  • Michael sSchumacher
  • broke many records in the early years of the century, including most races won (91), most world championships (7) and most poles (68) until his retirement in 2006. In 2010 he announced his return to
  • formula One
  • retired again in 2012 after three years without sport.
  • Sebastian Vettel
  • broke many records on his way to becoming the youngest-ever Formula One World Champion in 2010 at the age of 23, and then the youngest-ever double world champion in 2011 at the age of 24.
  • Sebastian Loeb
  • became the most successful rally racer of all time and won
  • World Racing Championship
  • a record nine times in a row between 2004 and 2012. He also set a new record for most wins, podiums and points scored.
  • Casey Stoner
  • his second win
  • MotoGP
  • World Champion (2007 and 2011) and announced his retirement from the sport at the age of 27 because he didn’t agree with the direction of the sport and wanted to spend more time with his family. His retirement will take effect at the end of the 2012 MotoGP season. Stoner has won every MotoGP race at least once.
  • Craig Lowndes
  • Be the first racer to get 100 race wins
  • Supercar Championship V8
  • .
  • Lewis Hamilton
  • broke records for the most important positions in his career
  • formula One
  • in 2019 and the record for most career wins in 2020.

rugby team[Editor]

  • Rugby World Cup 2003
  • – host
  • Australia
  • – won by
  • England
  • Rugby World Cup 2007
  • – host
  • France
  • – won by
  • South Africa
  • Rugby World Cup 2011
  • – host
  • New Zealand
  • – won by
  • New Zealand
  • Rugby World Cup 2015
  • – host
  • England
  • – won by
  • New Zealand
  • Rugby World Cup 2019
  • – host
  • Japan
  • – won by
  • South Africa

tennis (men)[Editor]

  • Roger Federer
  • win 20
  • Grand Slam
  • titles (6 Australian Open, 1 French Open, 8 Wimbledon and 5 US Open).
  • Peter Sampras
  • “Record of the 14th
  • Roger Federer,
  • Rafael Nadal
  • and
  • Novak Djokovic
  • completed one Grand Slam in his career, won the individual championship in
  • Australian Open
  • ,
  • France is open
  • ,
  • Wimbledon
  • and
  • US Open
  • ; Nadal also won the Olympic gold medal in singles at the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing to complete a gold showdown.
  • At the 2010 Wimbledon Championships, John Isner and Nicolas Mahut finished
  • longest tennis match of all time
  • . Isner won 6-4, 3-6, 6-7(7), 7-6(3), 70-68.
  • In 2019, Rafael Nadal became the first male player to win a Grand Slam tournament.
  • France is open
  • ) 12 times.

tennis (women)[Editor]

  • Serena Williams
  • won 23 Grand Slam titles (7 Australian, 3 French, 7 Wimbledon and 6 US Open) in the 21st century, in addition to her 1999 US Open title.
  • Maria Sharapova
  • was the first Russian tennis player to reach number 1 on August 22, 2005. She also retired in 2020.
  • From China
  • Li Na
  • won
  • French Open 2011
  • , who becomes the first player, male or female, from that country to win a Grand Slam.
  • Belarusians
  • Viktoria Azarenka
  • won
  • Australian Open 2012
  • , who became the first player, male or female, from that country to win a Grand Slam while also being No.
  • Caroline Wozniacki
  • ).

arts and entertainment[Editor]

art[Editor]

Contemporary Arts

  • Art: 21 – Art in the 21st Century
  • (2001–2018), a series of PBS

music[Editor]

AR RahmanOscar

at the turn of the century,compact disc(CD) was the standard form of music media, but alternative forms of music media began using it asdownload musicandstream. Athe riseSale ofrecordsadvanced in the 2010srecording personandaudio enthusiastPeople who prefer the sound of analogue records to digital ones. In 2020, vinyl overtook CD as the primary form of physical media for music consumers for the first time since the 1980s, although both will still be surpassed by streaming music for years to come.[79]As of 2020, the most active music streaming services areyoutube(1 billion monthly music users, 20 million paying subscribers),Tencent music(657 million monthly users, 42.7 million paid subscribers), 130 million paid subscribers),SoundCloud(175 million monthly users),Gana(152 million monthly users),JioSaavn(104 million monthly users),Spotify(286 million monthly users),Pandora(60.9 million monthly users) andapple music(60 million subscribers).[80]

TV[Editor]

For music, the story of the first two decades of the 21st century is developmentOnline TVServices that compete with older forms of television, such asTerrestrial TV,cable television, andsatellite. The first major player to dominate the streaming services market wasNetflix, start as aDVD-Delivery service in the late 1990s, transformation into a multimedia streaming platform, initially focused on delivering content produced by studios, then I started producing my own content, starting with the popular and critically acclaimed ones seriesdealerin 2013. Netflix’s success fueled the creation of many other streaming services, such asHi,YouTube Premium,Amazon Prime Video, andDisney, within a year of its launch, Netflix overtook Netflix to become the most downloaded TV streaming app.[81]

problems and worries[Editor]

  • The global warming.
  • Climate scientists have reached a consensus that the Earth is experiencing
  • People
  • (artificially)
  • the global warming
  • .
  • [82]
  • Economic and ecological costs are incalculable. Some scientists argue that human-caused global warming poses a significant risk
  • loss of biodiversity
  • and
  • Ecosystem Services
  • unless significant socio-political changes are introduced, particularly in relation to patterns of consumption and mass transportation.
  • [83]

peak oil production

  • Globalization.
  • progress in
  • telecommunications
  • and
  • Car
  • , the extension of
  • capitalism
  • and
  • democracy
  • [quarrel – discussion]
  • since the late 1980s and
  • free trade
  • Agreements have led to unprecedented global economic and cultural integration. Most economists are convinced of that
  • free trade
  • leads to economic growth and benefits most people, including small businesses.
  • [84]
  • However, in recent years there has been a backlash against globalization and its comeback
  • guard
  • Position of some heads of state and countries, especially the President of the United States
  • donald trump
  • and
  • Britain has decided to leave the European Union
  • .

dhakaBangladesh

[85]

  • Population.
  • The demographics of the world population will change dramatically with population in this century
  • Europe
  • and
  • East Asia
  • greatly reduced and the population of
  • Africa
  • And to a lesser extent
  • South Asia
  • grow significantly. That
  • united nation
  • appreciated that
  • world population
  • will reach 9.8 billion by 2050.
  • [eighty-six]
  • Much of this growth will take place in the world’s poorer countries, which could slow global poverty reduction and amplify the effects of climate change.
  • the global warming
  • can lead to large migrations.
  • overconsumption and overpopulation. The United Nations estimates that the world population will reach 9.2 billion by the middle of this century. Such growth raises questions of environmental sustainability and leads to many economic and political disruptions. In response, many countries have adopted policies that force or encourage their citizens to have fewer children, and others restrict immigration. There is a notable debate about what the ultimate carrying capacity of the planet might be; whether measures to prevent population growth are necessary; to what extent growth can be achieved safely through increased economic and ecological efficiency; and how the distribution mechanisms will adapt to demographic change. Many developed countries (especially Japan) will experience population decline, and the population debate is linked to discussions about wealth distribution.
  • Poor.
  • Poverty remains the root cause of many other diseases around the world, including
  • hunger
  • ,
  • illness
  • , and not enough
  • training
  • . Poverty contains many self-reinforcing elements (e.g., poverty can make education an unattainable luxury that tends to lead to persistent poverty) that various aid groups hope to remedy in this century. Great progress has been made in reducing poverty, particularly in China and India, but increasingly also in Africa.
  • microcredit
  • Lending is also beginning to become a useful anti-poverty tool.
  • Diseases.
  • AIDS
  • ,
  • tuberculosis
  • and
  • malaria
  • kills more than a million people annually.
  • HIV
  • There’s still no cure or vaccine, and while new cases are falling, it’s still a big problem, especially for women.
  • [eighty seven]
  • antibiotic resistance
  • is a growing concern for organisms like
  • tuberculosis
  • . Other diseases such as
  • SARS
  • ,
  • COVID-19
  • ,
  • Ebola
  • , that
  • zika virus
  • and
  • flu
  • Fluctuations are also a concern. That
  • World Health Organization
  • Yes
  • warning
  • possible flu
  • epidemic
  • arising
  • bird flu
  • mutation
  • . 2009 outbreak
  • swine flu
  • whose origin is still unknown.

nuclear weapons

[88]

  • war and terrorism.
  • Although war and terrorism have so far declined in the early 21st century,
  • [89]
  • positive conflict
  • continue around the world, such as
  • Syrian Civil War
  • , that
  • Yemeni Civil War
  • and
  • War in Afghanistan
  • . That
  • 9/11 terrorist attack
  • trigger the invasion
  • Afghanistan
  • and partial and controversial
  • Iraq
  • . That
  • War on Terror
  • saw the controversy end
  • civil liberties
  • , Accusations
  • torture
  • , terrorist attacks continue and instability, violence and military occupation persist. The violence continues
  • Arab-Israeli conflict
  • . There is still great concern
  • nuclear proliferation
  • , especially in
  • Iran
  • and
  • North Korea
  • , and the availability of
  • weapons of mass destruction
  • for rogue groups.
  • The War on Drugs. The legal, social, and military struggle waged by governments against drug cartels around the world has done increasingly little to end drug trafficking and use, while at the same time resulting in a relentless increase in human lives from that struggle. More than 100,000 people lost their lives as a result of this conflict, particularly after the 2006 Mexican drug war. Several jurisdictions have enacted some level of legalization or disabling of certain drugs, notably several US states that legalize marijuana for recreational or medical purposes.
  • Intellectual property.
  • The growing popularity of digital formats for entertainment media, such as film and music, and the ease with which they are copied and distributed over the Internet.
  • Internet
  • and
  • on the same level
  • Network, has raised concerns in the media industry
  • Copyright Infringement
  • . There is much debate as to the appropriate boundary between protection
  • license
  • ,
  • brand
  • and
  • License of Invention
  • right against
  • rational use
  • and
  • public domain
  • , in which some argue that such laws have changed significantly for intellectual property owners and have moved away from the public interest in recent years, while others argue that more such law changes have been made in response to perceived threats to creators’ rights from new technologies occur. and artists (or, as others say, against the outdated business models of the current entertainment industry).
  • domain
  • Cybersquatting and access to patented and generic drugs to fight epidemics in third world countries are other intellectual property concerns.
  • technology
  • Developments continue to change society.
  • communication and control
  • Technology continues to improve human intelligence, the union of man and machine. Some, especially
  • Ray Kurzweil
  • , has predicted that there will be one by the middle of this century
  • technological singularity
  • When
  • artificial intelligence
  • Smarter than man made. Also some
  • economists
  • expressed concern about it
  • technology unemployment
  • .

Death penalty for homosexuality

  • civil rights
  • , including
  • women’s rights
  • ,
  • LGBT rights
  • ,
  • racial equality
  • and the rights of
  • Deactivate
  • and
  • neural reversal
  • people is still a work in progress.
  • woman
  • not recognized or completely denied their rights in many countries, including
  • India
  • ,
  • China
  • [90]
  • and
  • Saudi Arabia
  • , and
  • sexual violence
  • Against women is still a huge problem all over the world.
  • Sex-selective abortion
  • Since 1990, the number of women born worldwide has declined, mainly due to
  • boy’s hobby
  • in
  • China
  • ,
  • India
  • ,
  • Pakistan
  • ,
  • Vietnam
  • ,
  • Korea
  • and several other smaller countries. In many countries the attitude is too
  • homosexuality
  • has become more tolerant.
  • Same-sex marriage
  • was legalized in some jurisdictions during the first two decades of the century but banned elsewhere by constitutional amendments. Meanwhile, some countries like
  • Uganda
  • and
  • Russia
  • have endeavored to strengthen their laws against any species
  • homosexuality
  • behavior or expression. Political battles over pro- or anti-gay laws have fueled much activism on the streets and online.
  • hate the group
  • remains a serious problem and minorities enjoy lower status in many countries, including the United States. Neurological diseases such as
  • auto-suggestion
  • gradually becoming more and more understood and accepted.

astronomical events[Editor]

  • 2004:
  • flight transfer
  • .
  • December 23, 2007:
  • big station wagon
  • , an intergalactic merger that occurs every 26,000 years.
  • 2009:
  • Combine three
  • Jupiter
  • Neptune
  • .
  • Solar eclipse on July 22, 2009
  • , a total of 6 minutes 38.8 seconds,
  • Saros
  • 136
  • Solar eclipse January 15, 2010
  • , the circle of 11 minutes 08 seconds,
  • Saros
  • 141. The longest of the century and also of the millennium.
  • 2012:
  • flight transfer
  • .
  • November 11, 2019:
  • Transit of Mercury
  • .
  • Solar eclipse June 21, 2020
  • , annular of 38 s,
  • Saros
  • 137

List of future astronomical events of the 21st century

See more[Editor]

  • Modern historical gate
  • 20th century
  • Timelines of recent history
  • Contemporary Arts
  • International relations since 1989

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Continue reading[Editor]

  • Adebajo, Adekeye, eds.
  • The Curse of Berlin: Africa after the Cold War
  • (Oxford UP, 2014).
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  • Post-Cold War America: The First 30 Years
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  • The Future of the World: Theology, Futurists, and the Post-Cold War Battle of the Imagination
  • (Oxford UP, 2018).
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  • 44.1 (2017): 47-68.
  • mark, Hal.
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  • (Springer, 2018).
  • Clapton, William edited.
  • Risk and Hierarchy in International Society: Liberal Interventionism in the Post-Cold War Era
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  • Dai, Jinhua, and Lisa Rofel, eds.
  • After the Cold War: The Future of Chinese History
  • (Duke UP, 2018).
  • Yangqing.
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  • Gertler, Mark, and Simon Gilchrist. “What Happened: Financial Factors During the Great Recession.”
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  • 32.3 (2018): 3-30.
  • On-line
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external link[Editor]

  • Reuters – World Situation
  • 21st Century History
  • Long bet
  • Platform for promoting long-term thinking
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  • it is a long time
  • long-standing cultural institutions
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Video tutorials about 21st century is what years

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21st Century Education

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This video discusses the need for 21st Century Learning and proposes the use of Inquiry-Based Learning as a suitable pedagogy.

It was created for the Inspiring Science Education Project as part of a series of videos to promote the use of Inquiry-Based Learning.

-http://inspiringscience.eu

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-https://info.aeseducation.com/businessitcenter21-demo-video

21st Century skills are three sets of ideas that’ll help today’s students succeed in the future workplace. Join Chris Zook, Content Marketing Manager at Applied Educational Systems, as he delves into 21st Century skills, what’s included, and why they’re important.

Learning Skills 00:41

Literacy Skills 01:06

Life Skills 02:03

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/decades-the-21st-century-the-first-20-years–575264552408962886/

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