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(PDF) Social Media and the Cost of Caring – ResearchGate

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  • Summary: Articles about (PDF) Social Media and the Cost of Caring – ResearchGate “A global measure of perceived stress.” Journal of health and social behavior: 385-396. 3. PEW RESEARCH CENTER.

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Social Media and the Cost of Caring – Academia.edu

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  • Summary: Articles about Social Media and the Cost of Caring – Academia.edu The center studies U.S. politics and policy views; media and journalism; … This finding about “the cost of caring” adds to the evidence that stress is …

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Social Media and the Cost of Caring – Pew Research Center

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  • Summary: Articles about Social Media and the Cost of Caring – Pew Research Center But, women who use a number of digital technologies to communicate with others report less stress than women who are non-users. In this survey, …

  • Match the search results: The cost of caring is particularly felt by women. This is a result of two facts about women and stress: first, women report higher levels of stress to begin with, and second, women are aware of more stressful events in the lives of their friends and family.

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The Cost of Caring | Pew Research Center

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  • Summary: Articles about The Cost of Caring | Pew Research Center People undergoing major life events can be at higher risk of physical and psychological distress, including depressive symptoms.

  • Match the search results: Awareness of some of the major events happening to their friends was related to stress in people’s own lives. But not all the events were tied to stress. Of course, because our list of twelve events is a sample from a lengthy potential list of stressful major life events, the true effect of the “cos…

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The ‘Cost of Caring’ on Social Media – VICE

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  • Summary: Articles about The ‘Cost of Caring’ on Social Media – VICE People who spend more time on social media don’t report higher levels of stress overall. In fact, the connectedness that digital communication …

  • Match the search results: But not everyone is equally susceptible to the "cost of caring." The researchers found that women were generally more stressed by the events of others in their network. This is borne out by the chart above: Pinterest users, 80 p​ercent of whom are women, reported the highest nu…

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Communication with Physicians about Health Care Costs

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  • Summary: Articles about Communication with Physicians about Health Care Costs Research Associate at Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, formerly Group Health Research Institute, in Seattle, WA. [email protected] 2 …

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    Results:

    Of 7200 invitations sent, 2200 survey responses were returned. Ninety-two percent wished to know their out-of-pocket costs before beginning treatment. Most respondents preferred their physician talk with them about out-of-pocket costs (81.4%)…

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Costs of a Staff Communication Intervention to Reduce …

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  • Summary: Articles about Costs of a Staff Communication Intervention to Reduce … The Changing Talk to Reduce Resistivenes to Dementia Care (CHAT) study found that an intervention that improved staff communication by reducing elderspeak led …

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    Costs to provide the intervention were determined in eleven NHs that participated in the CHAT study during 2011-2013 using process-based costing. Each NH provided data on staff wages for the quarter before and for two quarters after the CHAT i…

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Home | Health Communication Research Laboratory …

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  • Summary: Articles about Home | Health Communication Research Laboratory … Reach Expanding the reach of health information into vulnerable populations and communities. Connections Making connections that lin…

  • Match the search results: Dr. Penina Acayo Laker, director of the Health Communication Design Studio and Assistant Professor of Communication Design at Washington University’s Sam Fox School, received the Gerry and Bob Virgil Ethic of Service Award for her leadership engaging community partners at the intersection of racial …

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American River College: Home

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  • Summary: Articles about American River College: Home … Legal Studies, Management, Marketing, Real Estate, and Technical Communication. … Recreation, Respiratory Care, and Speech-Language Pathology.

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Health Care Price Transparency and Communication …

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  • Summary: Articles about Health Care Price Transparency and Communication … Many patients try to research costs before their appointments by using online cost estimator tools. Some of these tools are free [26], and others are offered by …

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Pulsara | Real Time Team Communication Across Healthcare …

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  • Summary: Articles about Pulsara | Real Time Team Communication Across Healthcare … Pulsara is a healthcare communication & telehealth platform connecting teams … care providers see reduced treatment times, reduced costs, and improve the …

  • Match the search results: Pulsara, a CommuniCare Technology, Inc. company DISCLAIMER: The Pulsara applications are intended to facilitate communication for and accelerate preparation of acute care coordination. The applications are not intended to be relied upon for making diagnostic or treatment decisions or used in connect…

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Communication Studies (BA) – Concordia University

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  • Summary: Articles about Communication Studies (BA) – Concordia University We are one of the most established and respected Communication Studies programs in North America, and are well known for combining creative media production …

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Communication and Dissemination Strategies To Facilitate the …

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  • Summary: Articles about Communication and Dissemination Strategies To Facilitate the … Rationale and Relevance for Conducting the Review. AHRQ sponsors research to improve the quality, effectiveness, and safety of health care in the United States.

  • Match the search results: Communication (KQ 1): For KQ 1, we will include studies that compare two or more of the included communication techniques head to head. Techniques of interest include tailored communication, communication targeted at audience segments; use of narratives; and message framing (see Table 5). These stra…

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Waste in the US Health Care System: Estimated Costs and …

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  • Summary: Articles about Waste in the US Health Care System: Estimated Costs and … This Special Communication uses a systematic literature review to update … Prior studies estimated that approximately 30% of health care …

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    The review yielded 71 estimates from 54 unique peer-reviewed publications, government-based reports, and reports from the gray literature. Computations yielded the following estimated ranges of total annual cost of waste: failure of care delivery, $102.4 billion to $165.7 billion; fai…

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What Is the Importance of Communication in Health Care?

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  • Summary: Articles about What Is the Importance of Communication in Health Care? Poor communication has been a factor in 1,744 patient deaths and over $1.7 billion in malpractice costs nationally in the past five years, according to a study …

  • Match the search results: When considering the importance of communication in health care, patient safety is one of the top reasons to create an effective communication structure in any health care organization. Inadequate communication is often a leading cause of in-hospital deaths. “In a retrospective review of 14,000 in-h…

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Communication skills 1: benefits of effective … – Nursing Times

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  • Summary: Articles about Communication skills 1: benefits of effective … – Nursing Times It is estimated that the cost of poor communication to the NHS is over £1bn … The Care Quality Commission’s 2016 Inpatient Survey asked …

  • Match the search results: Communication is defined as imparting or exchanging information, thoughts or ideas using speech, writing, or some other medium such as signals or behaviour. Effective communication protects patients from potential harm arising from misunderstandings. While communication failures leading to serious h…

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Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Program, Activities …

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  • Summary: Articles about Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Program, Activities … … SEL is a social emotional learning program designed to foster communication, … community developing boys and girls into compassionate and caring adults.

  • Match the search results: Districts from across the nation are seeing the benefits of Harmony in their classrooms, as their students are learning communication, collaboration, and mutual respect.

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Bavelas Communication in health care – University of Victoria

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  • Summary: Articles about Bavelas Communication in health care – University of Victoria Under a Canadian Institutes of Health Research – New Emerging Team grant, we collaborated with physicians and nurses at the British Columbia Cancer Agency, …

  • Match the search results: Del Vento, A., & Kirk, P. (Producers). (2008). How to break bad news. Practical tips for health care providers. DVD available from [email protected] (at cost) or individual copies free with self-addressed stamped envelope sent to Dr. Janet Bavelas, Department of Psychology, University of Victoria,…

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Multi-read content cost of caring study communication

For generations, commentators have worried about the impact of technology on human stress. Trains and industrial machines were seen as noise makers, disrupting rural village life and putting people in difficult situations. Cell phones interrupt the quiet time in the house. Wristwatches and clocks, added at the time of dehumanization, put pressure on factory workers to work efficiently. Radio and television are organized around advertising, which activates modern consumer culture and reinforces people’s fears of status.

Inevitably, critics have shifted their focus to digital technology. There has been extensive debate as to whether internet use in general and social media use in particular are associated with higher levels of stress.FirstSuch analysts often suggest that the people using the technology are most at risk. Critics fear that these technologies will take over people’s lives and create time pressures that put people at risk of negative physical and mental health effects from stress.

This study examines whether social media, cell phone, and internet use is associated with higher levels of stress. In a Pew Research Center survey of 1,801 adults2We asked participants how stressed they felt in their lives using an established stress scale called the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS).3This scale is based on people’s responses to 10 questions to assess whether they feel their lives are overwhelming, unpredictable, and out of control. Perceived stress, as measured by PSS, can be viewed as an assessment of the risk people face with stress-related mental disorders such as anxiety and depression, as well as physical conditions such as cardiovascular disease and the possibility of infectious diseases.

There are a number of known factors that make people feel more stressed, including things like economic insecurity, unemployment, and not having a spouse or partner to confide in. Previous studies have even found that perceptions of stressful events in other people’s lives is an important factor that helps people assess their own stress levels. The link between frequent use of digital technology and stress is unknown. We also examine the possibility that the social component of some digital technologies makes people more aware of stressful events in the lives of their close friends and family, as well as in the lives of acquaintances, who are more socially distant and associated with higher levels of stress.

The survey analysis produced two key findings that illustrate the complex interplay between digital technology and stress:

  • In total,
  • People who regularly use social media and the internet do not have higher stress levels.
  • In fact, the opposite is true for women, at least in some digital technologies. Other things being equal, women who used Twitter, email, and shared photos on their cell phones reported lower stress levels.
  • At the same time, the data shows that
  • There are instances where society uses digital technologies to raise awareness of stressful events in other people’s lives.
  • This perception is particularly high in women
  • To be
  • associated with higher levels of stress and is referred to as ‘care costs’. Stress has nothing to do with how often people use technology or how many friends a user has on social media platforms. But there’s one way people’s use of digital technology can be linked to stress:
  • Users who felt more stressed than those using digital technology were associated with higher awareness of stressful events in other people’s lives.
  • This finding of the “cost of care” adds to the evidence that stress can be contagious.
  • 4

Why is it that using social media isn’t directly related to stress, but for some people social media use can still lead to higher stress levels?

Answer: The relationship between stress and social media use is indirect. It’s the social use of digital technologies and how they raise awareness of traumatic events in other people’s lives and how using social media can make users feel more stressed.

Imagine a typical Facebook user. The person also has the option of using other digital technologies such as email and text messaging. All of these technologies allow the person to share information in the form of photos, short text messages and other contacts with friends and family. As a result of this communication, they become more aware of and reminded of activities in the lives of friends and family.

On the one hand, there are benefits from this exposure. Based onprevious researchfrom the Pew Research Center, compared to non-users and those who are not very active on Facebook, this person is likely to have: more close friends; have more trust in people; feel more supported; and politically relevant. While some might argue that this typical user of Facebook and other digital technologies suffers from peer pressure to join or keep up and is afraid of missing out, our typical users feel no more stress than they experienced, or the social benefits, if this pressure continues the use of these technologies will eliminate these additional costs. The person is likely to feel less stressed than someone who is inactive or inactive on social media.

On the other hand, there is a general exception to this relatively optimistic situation. Sometimes, social media users’ perceptions of events in other people’s lives include knowledge aboutunexpectedlyEvent, a friend or family member is fired or loses a loved one. Knowing about such events in the life of a friend or family member can lead to higher feelings of stress.

In summary, social media users do not feel stressed more than others, but a small group of social media users are more aware of stressful events in their friends’ lives, and this group of social media users feel more stressed .

Gender differences are an important part of this story. Women and men have different stress levels; their use of digital technologies varies; and the impact of their technology use varies.

The broad patterns are:

  • In general, women tend to be more stressed than men. However, women who use digital technologies to communicate with others tend to be less stressed than women who do not use these technologies.
  • Women are more aware of stressful events in the lives of their closest friends and family.
  • Social media use was associated with higher awareness of stressful events in the lives of people they knew.
  • The perception of stressful events in other people’s lives contributes significantly to one’s own stress. It was the only factor we found in common for social media use and mental stress. The number of stress-related adverse events is greater in women than in men.

Build on key insights

In general, women tend to be more stressed than men. However, women who used digital technologies to communicate with others reported less stress than women who did not.

In this survey, women gave an average score of 10.5 out of 30 on the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). Men reported an average score of 9.8 – a 7% lower score than women.

Because men and women perceive stress differently, we conducted separate analyzes for men and women. We created statistical models that allowed us to better understand the relationship between stress and the use of different technologies. Using regression analysis allows us to control for things like age, unemployment rate, education level and marital status – all of which are related to how much stress people have in their lives, whether they use technology or not.5

Regarding stress, there was no statistical difference in stress levels between men who used social media, cell phones, or the internet and men who did not use these technologies. However, some technological activities are associated with itrelieve pressureamong women – via Twitter, email and sharing photos via mobile phones. Compared to a woman who does not use these technologies, a woman who uses Twitter several times a day, sends or receives 25 emails a day, and shares two digital photos a day via her mobile phone scores 21% lower than a woman who uses these technologies didn’t use at all.

We don’t know what the specific technology applications related to stress relief are all about. However, recent studies have found that social sharing of positive and negative events can be linked to emotional well-being, and that women are more likely to share their emotional experiences with more people than men.6Sharing via email, texting pictures of events as they happen, and expressing your personality through Twitter-enabled snippets of activity can offer women a coping mechanism. It is also possible that the use of these facilities replaces activities or allows women to reorganize activities that would otherwise be more stressful.

Women are more aware of stressful events in the lives of their closest friends and family.

In the survey, we asked people if they knew if any of the events on a list of 12 stressful events happened to their loved one, acquaintance, or both in the past year. Events are selected from a list of major life events known as social stressors.7Our list ranges from relatively common to less common events: hospitalization, death in the family, divorce or marriage, dismissal/dismissal, indictment, starting work, dismissal/reduced salary, victim of crime, birth of a baby, moving home or back , pregnancy or childbirth and moving to a new home.

Of the 12 stressful events we studied, women, on average, were aware of a greater number of events happening in people they knew. On average, men were 7% less aware of stressful events in their closest social relationships.

Social media users tend to be more aware of stressful events in the lives of their acquaintances.

PI_2015-01-15_social-media-stress-01Different technologies are associated with different levels of perception of stressful events that have happened to other people—and also differ depending on whether those events happened to those involved in close relationships or not compared to more distant acquaintances.

Facebook is a technology for both men and women that offers greater awareness of stressful events in the lives of close and distant acquaintances. Other technologies are more specialized: some provide awareness of important life events in close relationships, while others provide awareness of activities in the lives of people who are less socially prominent. It’s not a new finding that people tend to use different technologies to communicate with different levels of social relationships. For example, other studies have found that cell phones and instant messaging are more likely to be used with family and close friends.8thAdding to this complexity, we found that men and women use digital technologies differently, and this is important for understanding how people are exposed to information about stressful events in their lives or in the lives of other people.

Among Facebook users:

  • A woman with an average network of Facebook friends was 13% more aware of stressful events in the lives of her closest friends than a comparable woman who did not use Facebook. And this average female user is 14% more aware of stressful events in the lives of her more distant acquaintances.
  • A male Facebook user who regularly comments on other people’s posts perceives stressful events in more than 8% of his closest social relationships. A man with an average network of Facebook friends is 6% more aware of important events in the lives of his acquaintances than a comparable man who does not use Facebook.

For women, awareness of stressful events in other people’s lives can also involve sharing pictures online via Pinterest and Twitter. For men, special awareness can include email, LinkedIn, and texting on their cell phones. These patterns are a result of the tendency of men and women to use different technologies, and they use different technologies to keep in touch with different types of people – friends, family, co-workers, and acquaintances.

The perception of stressful events in other people’s lives contributes significantly to one’s own stress. The number of stress-related adverse events is greater in women than in men.

The costs of care are of particular importance for women. This is due to two facts about women and stress: first, women report higher levels of initial stress and second, women perceive more stressful events in their lives, their friends and family.

While other things remain constant, women are aware that…

  • A loved one who has experienced the death of a child, partner or spouse scores 14% higher on our stress measure.
  • Someone nearby who was hospitalized or had an accident or serious injury reported 5% more stress.
  • An acquaintance who had been charged or arrested for a specific crime scored 11% higher on the stress measure.
  • An acquaintance who was demoted or had his salary cut said he had 9 percent more stress levels in his life.

For men, of the events we studied, only two were predicted to be stressful. While other things remain constant, men are aware that…

  • Someone close to them who was charged or arrested for a specific crime scored 15% higher on our stress level.
  • An acquaintance who was fired or had a pay cut at work reported that stress levels were 12% higher.

While small sips of information sent across social media may not seem like a lot, they can make a big difference. This study suggests that information communicated via social networks translates into perceptions of everything else, including perceptions of adverse events in the lives of family, friends, and acquaintances. Whether as a result of social media or more traditional forms of interaction, awareness of untoward events in the lives of others comes at the price of increased stress, and therefore greater risk for the physical and psychological problems that often accompany stress.

About this poll

The analysis in this report is based on the results of a nationally representative survey of 1,801 American adults (age 18 and older) conducted by the Pew Research Center between August 7 and September 16, 2012. The survey was conducted in English and Spanish via landline and mobile phones (N = 900). The error for the entire sample is plus or minus 2.6 percentage points. Approximately 1,076 respondents were users of social networking sites and the error for this subgroup was plus or minus 3.3 percentage points.

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Improve your English vocabulary and speaking with this ‘internet and technology’ 6 Minute English compilation from BBC Learning English! One hour of listening practice to help improve your English listening and learn LOTS of new vocabulary! There are 10 episodes and each contains authentic listening practice, fun quiz questions, analysis of new vocabulary and looks at how to use these words in real-life contexts!

0:00 Can cryptocurrencies be trusted?

06:12 Virtual assistants

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48:53 Artificial intelligence: what can and can’t it do?

54:58 Are smartphones killing cameras?

𝐃𝐢𝐬𝐜𝐨𝐯𝐞𝐫 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐩𝐨𝐩𝐮𝐥𝐚𝐫 𝐞𝐩𝐢𝐬𝐨𝐝𝐞𝐬 𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞:

Will humans become extinct?

-https://youtu.be/HMKqVxiPFVI

Meditation and your brain

-https://youtu.be/sm6EtQg-hxw

How to disagree better

-https://youtu.be/rWHGKGS7zSc

How do you learn to speak a language?

-https://youtu.be/wkjSBC-_bDA

Why does seeing someone yawn make us yawn?

-https://youtu.be/-aLUbUMVYAc

𝐎𝐫, 𝐲𝐨𝐮 𝐜𝐚𝐧 𝐟𝐢𝐧𝐝 𝐦𝐨𝐫𝐞 𝐨𝐟 𝐨𝐮𝐫 𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐩𝐢𝐥𝐚𝐭𝐢𝐨𝐧 𝐯𝐢𝐝𝐞𝐨𝐬 𝐡𝐞𝐫𝐞:

-https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLcetZ6gSk9692mmNM_kookP3nt7ipAtoI

#BBCLearningEnglish #LearnEnglish #6MinuteEnglish

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