Best 19 how many legs does a scorpion have

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how many legs does a scorpion have

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Scorpion – Wikipedia

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  • Summary: Articles about Scorpion – Wikipedia Scorpions are predatory arachnids of the order Scorpiones. They have eight legs, and are easily recognized by a pair of grasping pincers and a narrow, …

  • Match the search results: The pedipalp is a segmented, clawed appendage used for prey immobilization, defense and sensory purposes. The segments of the pedipalp (from closest to the body outward) are coxa, trochanter, femur, patella, tibia (including the fixed claw and the manus) and tarsus (moveable claw). A scorpion has da…

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Scorpion – National Geographic Kids

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  • Summary: Articles about Scorpion – National Geographic Kids Scorpions are arachnids and have eight legs like their cousins—spiders, mites, and ticks. They can quickly grab an insect with their pincers and whip their …

  • Match the search results: Scorpions are arachnids and have eight legs like their cousins—spiders, mites, and ticks. They can quickly grab an insect with their pincers and whip their telson, the poisonous tip of their tail forward and sting their prey. They use their poison to kill prey and to defend against predators.

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Scorpion | San Diego Zoo Animals & Plants

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  • Summary: Articles about Scorpion | San Diego Zoo Animals & Plants Scorpions are not insects but arachnids, like spiders, and have eight legs and two main body regions, the prosoma, or cephalothorax, and the opisthosoma, …

  • Match the search results: The scorpion’s four pairs of legs are attached to the prosoma as well. Scorpions find their way through sensory structures in their legs, by feeling along with brush-like structures called pectines attached to the underside of the abdomen, and through fine sensory hairs to detect vibrations. Male sc…

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scorpion | Description, Habitat, Species, Diet, & Facts

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  • Summary: Articles about scorpion | Description, Habitat, Species, Diet, & Facts Many of the thick-tailed scorpions (family Buthidae), however, actively search for prey. These species usually have long, slender bodies and pincers (chelae).

  • Match the search results: Breeding is seasonal and generally occurs during the warm months, ranging from late spring through early fall. Males may travel hundreds of metres to find receptive females. It appears that males find females by localizing a pheromone that the female emits from the end of her abdomen. Mating in scor…

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Scorpion Insect Facts – AZ Animals

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  • Summary: Articles about Scorpion Insect Facts – AZ Animals Technically, a scorpion has eight legs as it’s an arachnid, however, two of the legs actually work as pincers. Functionally, it appears as …

  • Match the search results: Technically, a scorpion has eight legs as it’s an arachnid, however, two of the legs actually work as pincers. Functionally, it appears as though the scorpion has three legs on each side of its body.

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Scorpion Anatomy | Ask A Biologist

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  • Summary: Articles about Scorpion Anatomy | Ask A Biologist Both are part of the subgroup (Class) Arachnida. If you do some research, you will find that these animals share common characteristics, such as …

  • Match the search results: The anatomy of a scorpion has some similar characteristics to other arthropods, such as lobsters and crabs. They also have similar features to spiders and other arachnids. Just count the number of legs and you will see how they match the number of legs found on spiders. Click image to enlarge.

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Scorpion Facts & Information for Kids and Researchers

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  • Summary: Articles about Scorpion Facts & Information for Kids and Researchers Scorpions are arthropods, they have eight legs, two pedipalps, and a tail with a venom-injecting barb. Scorpions have two venom glands that produce venom …

  • Match the search results: Scorpions, like spiders, are arachnids (pronounced uh-rak-nid) and all arachnids share a well-known body characteristic; eight legs. In addition, arachnids lack wings and antennae, which can also help identify them.

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Scorpion facts for kids | National Geographic Kids

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  • Summary: Articles about Scorpion facts for kids | National Geographic Kids Scorpions are arachnids and have eight legs like their cousins – spiders, … In the hot, dry deserts, where many species live, scorpions cope with the …

  • Match the search results: Scorpions are arachnids and have eight legs like their cousins – spiders, mites and ticks. They look a bit like small lobsters, equipped with a pair of pincers and a thin, segmented tail that curves over their back. These cool critters can be found on every continent around the world, except Antarct…

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Myth: “Eight legs” always means “spider” | Burke Museum

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  • Summary: Articles about Myth: “Eight legs” always means “spider” | Burke Museum Fact: Not exactly. Scorpions, harvestmen, ticks, and in fact all arachnids—not just spiders—have four pairs of legs (see illustrations). Insects have three …

  • Match the search results: Fact: Not exactly. Scorpions, harvestmen, ticks, and in fact all arachnids—not just spiders—have four pairs of legs (see illustrations). Insects have three pairs. Also, notice that I said "four pairs" instead of "eight." The number of leg pairs (one pair per leg-bearing segment) …

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Scorpions – Animals – Ducksters

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  • Summary: Articles about Scorpions – Animals – Ducksters Learn about Scorpions. These arachnids have eight legs, pincers, and a venomous stinger on their tail.

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Scorpion Facts: What You Need to Know – Terminix

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  • Summary: Articles about Scorpion Facts: What You Need to Know – Terminix Behind the pedipalps are four pairs of legs that allow the scorpion to quickly … Many of the scorpion facts that concern scientists and doctors have to do …

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Class Arachnida | Department of Entomology

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  • Summary: Articles about Class Arachnida | Department of Entomology Scorpions are relatively large arachnids. Like other arachnids, their body consists of a cephalothorax, which bears the mouthparts and legs, and an abdomen.

  • Match the search results: Scorpions are relatively large
    arachnids.  Like other arachnids, their body consists of a
    cephalothorax, which bears the mouthparts and legs, and an abdomen. 
    They are characterized by having four pairs of legs, large
    clawlike pedipalps, and a five-segmented abdomen with a stin…

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David Dimbleby tattoo raises question of scorpion’s legs – BBC

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  • Summary: Articles about David Dimbleby tattoo raises question of scorpion’s legs – BBC But scorpions – members of the arachnida class along with spiders – actually have eight legs, as well as their distinctive pincers. So the big …

  • Match the search results: The related arachnids known as whip scorpions only had six "walking legs", he added – but they had two more legs which they used as feelers.

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Class Arachnida | Department of Entomology

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  • Summary: Articles about Class Arachnida | Department of Entomology Scorpions are relatively large arachnids. Like other arachnids, their body consists of a cephalothorax, which bears the mouthparts and legs, and an abdomen.

  • Match the search results: Scorpions are relatively large
    arachnids.  Like other arachnids, their body consists of a
    cephalothorax, which bears the mouthparts and legs, and an abdomen. 
    They are characterized by having four pairs of legs, large
    clawlike pedipalps, and a five-segmented abdomen with a stin…

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Scorpions – The Australian Museum

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  • Summary: Articles about Scorpions – The Australian Museum The largest Australian scorpions can grow to 12 cm long, but many forest … two to five smaller eyes on each side – scorpions do not have good eyesight.

  • Match the search results: Scorpions are arachnids, which means that they are related to animals such as spiders, ticks, mites and harvestmen. Arachnids are characterised by possessing four pairs of legs and a body divided into two parts – the cephalothorax (containing the mouthparts, eyes, pedipalps and legs) and the abdomen…

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Scorpion Facts for Kids, Students & Adults – Active Wild

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  • Summary: Articles about Scorpion Facts for Kids, Students & Adults – Active Wild All arachnids have 8 legs, together with an additional pair of appendages at the front … How Many Scorpion Species Are There? … Where Do Scorpions Live?

  • Match the search results: The prosoma is like the fused-together head and thorax of an insect. (The head and the thorax are the front and middle parts of an insect.) This part of the scorpion’s body houses the mouthparts and eyes. It’s also the part of the body to which the pincers and eight legs are attached.

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What are Arachnids? • Minibeasts • MyLearning

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  • Summary: Articles about What are Arachnids? • Minibeasts • MyLearning Arachnids include spiders, scorpions, mites and ticks. There are about 60,000 species of arachnids. Arachnids have eight legs, not six like insects.

  • Match the search results: Arachnids have two parts to their body – the cephalothorax and the abdomen. The cephalothorax is like the head and thorax section of an insect but it is fused together.  It contains the legs, mouth parts and sense organs. The abdomen contains the main organs, just like insects.

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Arachnida – spiders, scorpions, mites, ticks – New Hampshire …

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  • Summary: Articles about Arachnida – spiders, scorpions, mites, ticks – New Hampshire … Like most arthropods, arachnids have eight jointed legs and an exoskeleton. … Many species of spiders spin webs that they use to trap prey.

  • Match the search results: Arachnids have four pairs of walking legs, a pair of jointed jaws with fangs called the chelicerae, and a pair of antenna-like pedipalps. The opisthosoma is the rear half of the body and it has no appendages. Arachnids have no antennae.

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Scorpions | Space for life – Espace pour la vie

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  • Summary: Articles about Scorpions | Space for life – Espace pour la vie Scorpions have eight legs and a pair of front appendages called pedipalps. These pedipalps have claws for catching their prey. Scorpions have long tails …

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Multi-read content how many legs does a scorpion have

Scorpio (disambiguation)

Scorpio Time Range: 435–0 Ma
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WOMAN

Early Silurian – present

Hottentotta tamulus, Indian red scorpion
scientific classification
Kingdom: animals
phylum: arthropod
sub phylum: chelicerata
Class: arachnid
Order: Scorpions C. L. Koch, 1837
Families
cf. taxonomy
Natural Scorpions Range

Scorpionto behunt arthropodsLater onorder scorpions. They have eight legs and are easily recognized by a pair.hold the pinand a narrow, multi-part tail, often with a characteristic forward curve at the rear and always ending ininsurance. The evolutionary history of scorpions goes back435 million years. They mainly livedeserthowever, it has adapted to many environmental conditions and can be found on all continents exceptAntarctica. There are more than 2,500 recipesSpecies, with 22 existing (living) families recognized to date. from themclassificationChanging for the 21st centurygenetic codeto learn.

Scorpions prey mostlybugand the otherinvertebratesbut some species huntvertebrates. They use pliers to restrain and kill their prey, or to prevent their own predation. This poisonUsed for attack and defense. During courtship, the man and woman grab each other’s pincers and dance as they try to get him in.sperm pack. Returns all known speciesliveand children care about youngexoskeletonhardened, carrying them on their backs. The exoskeleton includes:Fluorescentchemical and under glowultraviolet raylight.

Most species do not pose a serious threat to humans, and healthy adults usually do not require medical treatment after being stung. About 25 species (less than onepercentage) has poison that can kill a person, this often happens in parts of the world where they mostly live in areas where medical treatment is inaccessible.

Scorpions appear in art, folklore, mythology, and trademarks.scorpion patternwoven intorugMats to protect them from stings.Scorpionis the name of a constellation; correspondingastrological sign Scorpio. A classic Scorpius legend tells how the giant scorpion and his enemies came to be.onionbecome constellations on opposite sides of the sky.

  • 1 etymology
  • 2 Evolution
  • 2.1 The fossil record
    2.2 Phylogenetics
    2.3 Classification
  • 3 Geographical distribution
  • 4 Morphology
  • 4.1 Cephalothorax
    4.2 Mesosomes
    4.3 Metasoma
  • 5 Biology
  • 5.1 Mortality and defense
    5.2 Diet and nutrition
    5.3 Mating
    5.4 Birth and development
    5.5 Fluorescent
  • 6 relationships with people
  • 6.1 Burns
    6.2 Possibility of medical use
    6.3 Consumption
    6.4 Pets
    6.5 Culture
  • 7 notes
  • 8 References
  • 8.1 Source
  • 9 External Links

etymology

From “scorpion”incomingIntermediate EnglishBetween 1175 and 1225 ADold french scorpion,[first]or italianscorpionBoth are derived from Latin.Scorpion, which is equivalentscorpion,[2nd]Which one?to latinaseGreekΣκορπίοίο-scorepios,[3]last wordProto-Indo-European Origin *(s) ker-means “cut”, x. “to cut”.[4]

Evolution

allopaleophonus

paleophoneHunter

Silurian

[5]

fossil record

Palaeophonus nuncius

Silurian

scorpionfossilfound in manyStrataincluding maritimeSilurianand the estuaryDevonian perioddeposit, coal bedmetal ageandamber. It is debated whether the first scorpions were at sea or on land.lung booklike modern terrestrial species.[6][7][8][9]More than 100 fossil scorpion species have been described.[front]Oldest found as of 2021Dolichophonusoudonensislived during the Silurian period in present-day Scotland.[11th] Gondwana ScorpioIt is one of the oldest known terrestrial animals from the Devonian period.Gondwanasuper continent.[twelfth]

phylogenetics

scorpions abranchin pulmonatearachnid(people with book lungs). Arachnida is placedchelicerata, a subgrouparthropodit includessea ​​spiderandhorseshoe crab, along with terrestrial animals without book lungs, for exampleticksandreaper.[6]ExtinctionEurypterida, sometimes called sea scorpions, but not all marine species or scorpions; their gripchelicera, Notsimilarwith scorpion’s needles (second appendages).[13]scorpionsolder sisterto arrivetetrapulmonatea terrestrial pulmonate group that includesspiderand whip the scorpions. it’s 2019cladding panelssummary:[6]

chelicerata Pycnogonida (sea spider)

prosomapoda

Xiphosura (horseshoe crab)

† Eurypterida (sea scorpion)

arachnid

non-pulmonate

(mites, sickles, etc.)

pulmonate

scorpions

tetrapulmonate

Araneae (spider)

Pedipalpi (whip scorpion, etc.)

internalphylogenyscorpions discussed,[6]howevergenetic codeanalysis always putBothriuridaeThey are sisters of a race that includes Scorpionoidea andChactoidea fungus. Scorpions differed between the Devonian and early periods.Coniferous. The main division is subdivided into the Buthida and Iurida clusters. The Bothriuridae divergence began before temperate Gondwana split into separate landmasses.Jura. Both Iuroidea and Chactoidea are not considered a separate group and are denoted as “”.anaphylactic paralysis”(with quotes) in this 2018 chart.[14]

scorpions Buthida

chaeriloidea

pseudocactoidea

Buthoidea

Iurida

“Iuroidea” (episode)

both of them

“Chactoidea” (episode)

“Iuroidea” (episode)

“Chactoidea” (episode)

Scorpion

taxonomy

Classification of scorpions

Carl Linnaeusdescribed six scorpion species in its genusScorpionin 1758 and 1767; three of these are now considered valid andScorpion,androctonus australis, andEuscorpius carpathicus; the other three names are suspicious. He placed scorpions among “Insecta aptera” (wingless insects), a group that includes crustaceans, Arachnidae and Arachnida.myriapoda.[15]in 1801Jean-Baptiste LamarckSplit “Insecta aptera”, createclassificationArachnids for spiders, scorpions and mites (mites and ticks), also include:thysanura(thrips), Myriapoda and parasites such as lice.[16]Germanarachnologist Carl Ludwig KochHe created the team Scorpiones in 1837. He divided it into four families: the six-eyed scorpion “Scorpionides”, the eight-eyed scorpion “Buthides”, the ten-eyed scorpion “Centrurides”, and the twelve-eyed scorpion “Androctonides”. .[17]

More recently, about 22 families with more than 2,500 species of scorpions have been described, with many additions and rearrangements of many taxa in the 21st century.[18][6][19]There are more than 100 identified fossil scorpion taxa.[front]This classification is based on Soleglad and Fet (2003).[20]It replaced Stockwell’s older, unpublished classification.[21]Subsequent taxonomic changes came from the papers of Soleglad et al. (2005).[22][23]

taxa available forgrantbetweenfamily(number of species in brackets[18]) to be:

Scorpion Order

Centruroides vittatus

Buthidae

heterometrus laoticus

Scorpion

  • Parvorder
  • pseudocactida
  • solegad
  • Superfamily Pseudochactoidea Gromov, 1998
    Family Pseudochactidae Gromov, 1998 (1 sp.) (Central Asian scorpions of semi-savanan habitat)
  • Parvorder
  • Buthida
  • solegad
  • Superfamily Buthoidea C. L. Koch, 1837
    Family Buthidae C. L. Koch, 1837 (1209 spp.) (Thick-tailed scorpions, including the most dangerous)
    Family Microcharmidae Lourenço, 1996, 2019 (17 spp.) (African scorpions live in wet forest leaves)
  • Parvorder
  • chaerilida
  • solegad
  • Superfamily Chaeriloidea Pocock, 1893
    Family Chaerilidae Pocock, 1893 (51 spp.) (South and Southeast Asian scorpions live in non-arid areas)
  • Parvorder
  • Iurida
  • solegad
  • Superfamily Chactoidea Pocock, 1893
    Family Akravidae Levy, 2007 (1 sp.) (Israeli cave scorpion)
    Family Belisariidae Lourenço, 1998 (3 spp.) (Southern European cave-related scorpions)
    Family Chactidae Pocock, 1893 (209 spp.) (New World scorpion, replacing member)
    Euscorpiidae Family Laurie, 1896 (170 spp.) (harmless scorpions of the Americas, Eurasia, and North Africa)
    Family Superstitioniidae Stahnke, 1940 (1 sp.) (Cave scorpions of Mexico and the southwestern United States)
    Family Troglotayosicidae Lourenço, 1998 (4 spp.) (Scorpions related to South American caves)
    Family Typhlochactidae Mitchell, 1971 (11 spp.) (Cave-related scorpions of eastern Mexico)
    Family Vaejovidae Thorell, 1876 (222 spp.) (New World Scorpion)
    Superfamily Iuroidea Thorell, 1876
    Family Caraboctonidae Kraepelin, 1905 (23 spp.) (Haired scorpion)
    Family Hadruridae Stahnke, 1974 (9 spp.) (North American Greater Scorpion)
    Family Iuridae Thorell, 1876 (21 spp.) (Scorpions have a large tooth inside their movable claws)
    Superfamily Scorpionoidea Latreille, 1802
    Family Bothriuridae Simon, 1880 (158 spp.) (Southern Hemisphere temperate and tropical scorpions)
    Family Hemiscorpiidae Pocock, 1893 (16 spp.) (Middle Eastern rock, climbing or tree scorpions)
    Hormuridae Family Laurie, 1896 (92 spp.) (flat, slit scorpion in Southeast Asia and Australia)
    Family Rugodentidae Bastawade et al., 2005 (1 sp.) (Indian burrowing scorpion)
    Family Scorpionidae Latreille, 1802 (183 spp.) (nesting scorpion or pale-legged scorpion)
    Family Diplocentridae Karsch, 1880 (134 spp.) (Closely related and sometimes included in Scorpionidae, but with spines on telson)
    Family Heteroscorpionidae Kraepelin, 1905 (6 spp.) (Madagascar scorpion)

Geographical distribution

Found on all continents except scorpionsAntarctica. The diversity of scorpions is greatest in subtropical regions; Although scorpions are found in the tropics, it decreases towards the poles and equator. Scorpio naturally invisibleBritain,New Zelandand some islandsOceania, but now by mistaketo introduceby people to these places[24]five coloniesEuscorpius flavicaudisEstablished itself in the late 19th centurytransparencyIn England at 51°N,[25][26][27]durationParuroctonus boreuslive as far northRed Deer, Alberta, at 52°N.[28]Some of the above typesIUCN Red Book;Lychas brauericlassified asextremely dangerous(2014),isometric deharvengiashas the ability to perish(2016) andChiromachus ochropusassensitive(2014).[29][30][thirtyfirst]

Scorpionxerocols, that is, they mainly live indesert, but they can be found almost anywherehabitathigh mountains, caves andtidal zone. mostly absentsubmarine ecosystemastundra, heightTaiga, and mountain peaks.[32][6]The highest altitude reached by a scorpion is 5,500 meters (18,000 ft) above the Andes.Orobothriurus crassimanus.[33]

evil eyemicrohabitats, scorpions can live on the ground,love trees,love rock musicor love sand. some species such asvaejovis janssi, versatile and found in all of the above habitatsSocorro Island,baja california, while othersEuscorpius carpathicus,endemicto arrivecoastal areaThe rivers in Romania occupy special niches.[34][35]

morphology

Cheloctonus jonesii

prosomamesosomemetasomapedipalpscheliceraewaterfallsarcastictelson

The sizes of scorpions range from 8.5 mm (0.33 in).Typhlochactas mitchelliTyphlochactidae,[34]up to 23 cm (9.1 in.)heterometrus swammerdamitype of scorpion.[36]The body of the scorpion is divided into two parts, orticket:cephalothoracicor prosoma, and belly oropistosome.[one]The opisthosoma is broadly divided anteriorly.mesodermoid tumoror anterior abdomen and tail-like narrow hindquarters,metasomaor the back of the abdomen.[38]In most species, external differences between the sexes are not obvious. In some cases, the metasome in males is longer than in females.[39]

cephalothorax

Cephalothorax includes:shovel, eyes, chelicerae (mouthparts),pedipalps(Yeahwaterfall, commonly known as scrolls or pins) and four pairswalking foot. Scorpions have two eyes above the cephalothorax and usually two to five pairs of eyes along the anterior corners of the cephalothorax. While they cannot produce sharp images, their central eyes are one of the most sensitive to light in the animal kingdom, especially in dim light, enabling nocturnal species to use starlight to navigate at night.[40]Chelicerae are located in front of and below the bark. They look like pincers and have three segments and sharp “teeth”.[41][42]The scorpion’s brain is located behind the cephalothorax, just above it.Your wife.[43]As in other arachnids, the nervous system is highly concentrated in the cerebral cortex but has a long, segmented ventricular nerve.ganglionthis can beprimitivecharacteristic.[44]

The pedipalp is a segment with claws.extraUsed for prey immobilization, defense and sensory purposes. The segments of the foot (proximal to the body outward) are the coxa, tibia, femur, patella, tibia (including fixed and muscular hoof), and tarsus (movable nail). Scorpions have dark raised or granular linear backs called “spine” or “carina” on their legs and other parts of the body; They are useful as classificationcharacter.[45]Unlike the legs of some other spiders, the legs are not modified for other purposes, but they can sometimes be used for digging and the female may use them to catch emerging young. . Legs are coveredacceptor,setaand emotionhair.[forty-six]Depending on the species, the legs can be spiny or spiny.[47]

mesosome

pectins

Mesodermoma or preeclampsia is a large section of the vas deferens.[38]It containsfrontSevenhair(segments) ocular tumor, each segment coveredBack sidewith a scleral plate, itstergit.Your wifeThe somas are armored by connecting plates 3 to 7.sternite. Somite 1 has a pair of genitals on its ventral side.operculaincludesgonopore. Sternite 2 forms the carrier platepectins,[48]act as sense organs.[49]

The next four somas, 3 to 6, all carry doublessoul. They serve as openings, known as the respiratory organs of scorpions.lung book. The openings can be slotted, circular, elliptical or oval, depending on the species.[50][51]Thus there are four pairs of book lungs; Each type contains a fine number from 140 to 150lamellaOn the abdominal side, the lungs, which are connected to the atria that open to the vents, are filled with air. The bristles hold the leaf blades apart. A muscle that opens the faucet and expands the atrium; The sternocleidomastoid muscle contracts to compress the lungs, expelling air, and relaxes to allow the lungs to refill.[52]The 7th and final Somit has no suffixes or any other significant external structure.[50]

The mesenchymal tumor containing the heart or “dorsal vein” is the center of the scorpion.open circulatory system. The heart is continuous with a deep arterial system spread throughout the body. Gives sinus deoxygenated blood (hemolymph) to the heart; The blood is re-oxygenated through the heart openings. The mesoderm also contains the reproductive system. WomanOvarianconsisting of three or four pipes running parallel to each other and connected by two to four horizontal pipesanastomosis. These tubes are the location of bothoocyteembryonic growth and development. They connect with twooviductIt connects to an atrium leading to the genital opening.[53]Males have two gonads consisting of two cylindrical tubes with a ladder-like structure; contain cysts.sperm. Both pipes endssperm ducts, one on each side of the mesothelioma. They are attached to glandular symmetrical structures called parietal organs that terminate in the genital opening. secreteschitintogether to create base-based structuressperm bank.[54][55]

metasoma

Arizona bark scorpion

The “tail” or super-u consists of five parts andtelson, which is not a segment. The five parts are body rings only; they lack an obvious sternae or terga and grow at a distance. These segments have spines, bristles, and bristles that can be used for classification according to the classification system. The anus is located at the distal and terminal end of the terminal segment surrounded by four anal papillae and anal arch.[50]Some species have light receptors in their tails.[40]

Telsons include:bubblescontains a symmetrical pairpoisonlines. Externally, it bears a curved tip, a subcutaneous fungus equipped with sensory hairs. Each venom gland has its own duct to deliver its secretions along the duct from the gland to just near the tip, where each paired duct has its own venom hole.[56]An external musculature in the tail propels it forward and propels and penetrates the aculeus, while an internal musculature attached to the glands pumps the venom into the victim through the needle.[57]end cupmetalloproteinswith zinc, hardened.[58]The optimum penetration angle is about 30 degrees from the tip of the pen.[59]

bibliography

Centruroides limpidus

most of the scorpionsat nightor twilightDuring the day, take refuge in hollows, crevices, and bark.[60]Many species dig for shelter under rocks several centimeters long. Some may use burrows made by other animals, including spiders, reptiles, and small mammals. Other species dig their own burrows of varying complexity and depth.HadrurusSpecies that penetrate more than 2 m (6 ft 7 in) deep. Excavations are made using the mouth, claw and foot parts. In some species, particularly in the Buthidae family, individuals may congregate in the same shelter; Shell scorpions can gather up to 30 individuals. In some species, brood and brood families sometimes cluster together.[sixty one]

Scorpions prefer areas where temperatures stay between 11–40 °C (52–104 °F) but can survive temperatures ranging from freezing to desert temperatures.[62][63]Scorpions can withstand high temperatures:Leiurus quinquestriatus,ScorpionandHadrurus arizonensisthey can survive at 45–50 °C (113–122 °F) if they are adequately hydrated. Desert species have to deal with extreme temperature changes from day to night or between seasons;Pectinibuthus birulaiIt lives in the temperature range of -30–50 °C (−22–122 °F). Desert-dwelling scorpions prefer cooler temperatures. Cold resistance may be related to increased sugar levelstrehalosewhen the temperature drops. some specieshibernation.[sixty-four]Scorpio looks resilientionizing radiation. This was discovered in the early 1960s when it was discovered that scorpions were one of the few animals that had survived nuclear testing.reggan, Algeria.[65]

Desert scorpions have several adaptations to conserve water. release insoluble compounds such asxanthine,guanine, anduric acidThey do not need water to remove from the body. Guanine is the main ingredient and maximizes the amount of nitrogen excreted. Scorpion cuticle passes moisture throughfatand waxes from the epidermal glands and protects againstultraviolet ray. Scorpions can withstand high temperatures even when dehydrated.osmotic pressurein his blood.[66]Desert scorpions get most of their moisture from the food they eat, but some can draw water from moist soil. Species that live in denser vegetation and more moderate temperatures will drink in trees and puddles.[sixtyseven]

poison

Scorpions use their stings to kill and defend their prey. Some species attack directly, quickly with their tails, while others launch slower, more rounded attacks that can put their stingers in a position where they can easily strike back.Leiurus quinquestriatuscan whip its tail up to 128 cm/s (50 in/s) during defensive attack.[68]

death and defense

It can be attacked by other arthropods such as scorpions, ants, spiders.solidsandcentipede. Bigcarnivorousincluding frogs, lizards, snakes, birds and mammals.[69] meerkatspartially specialized in hunting scorpions, biting their stings and immune to their venom.[70][71]Other carnivores adapted for hunting scorpions include:grasshopper mouseanddesert long-eared batIt is also immune to its poisons.[72][seventy three]In one study, 70% of the latter contained scorpion parts.[seventy three]Parasitic scorpions include:mites,flies,roundwormsand some bacteria. This immune systemscorpions provide them with resistance to infections caused by various bacteria.[74]

When a scorpion is threatened, it raises its claws and tail in a defensive position. some speciessay it out loudto warn predators by rubbing some feathers, tips or claws.[69]Some species prefer to use claws or needles for defense, depending on the size of the appendages.[75]Some types of scorpions, for exampleparabutus,Centruroides margaritatus, andHadrurus arizonensissprays venom in a narrow jet of water up to 1 meter (3.3 ft) long to warn potential predators that could injure their eyes.[76]Someanthersspecies canshed their tailsto escape from predators. These organs do not regrow, which means they cannot burn and excrete them, but they can still catch small prey and then reproduce for at least eight months.[77]

Diet and nutrition

thick

Scorpions usually prey on insects, especiallyGrasshopper,cricket,termite,bugandgiant hornet. Other prey include spiders,solids,firewoodand even smallvertebratesincluding lizards, snakes and mammals. Species with large claws can hunt worms and mollusks. Most species are opportunistic and consume a wide variety of prey, although some species can be highly specialized;Isomeroides vescusSpider specializes in digging. The size of the prey depends on the size of the species. Some types of scorpionspredator sits and waitsThis includes waiting for their prey at or near the entrance to their burrows. Others actively seek them out. Scorpions spot their preysensitiveandchemicallyThey have feathers on their bodies and catch them with their claws. Small animals, especially those with large claws, are killed with claws only. A larger and more aggressive prey will be introduced.[78][79]

Scorpions, like other spiders, digest their food from outside. The very sharp chelicerae are used to draw small amounts of food from prey into the pre-oral cavity under the chelicera and shell. The digestive juices from the intestines are digested into the food, and the digested food is then absorbed into the intestines in liquid form. Any indigestible solids (eg.exoskeletontrapped by the debrishairanterior and expelled in the oral cavity. The absorbed food is pumped into the middle tube.pharynx, more digested here. Waste passes through the anus and out through the anus. Scorpions can consume large amounts of food in one meal. They have an efficient and very low food storage organ.metabolic rateand a relatively sedentary lifestyle. This allows some to survive six to twelve months of starvation.[80]

mating

two person excursion

Most scorpions reproduce sexually with males and females; species in various genera such ashot faceandTitusand speciescentruroides gracilis,Liochles australasia, andAnanteris coinIt has been reported that it is not reliable to reproduce viareproductiveAn unfertilized egg developsembryo.[81]Women absorb productionpheromonescaught by wandering males using their pectins to scrub the substrate. Males begin courtship by moving their bodies back and forth without moving their legs, a behavior known as judgment. This seems to create ground vibrations picked up by the female.[54]

The couple then makes contact and performs using their pedals.splashin your nametwo person excursion(French for “walk for two”). In this dance, the male and female move back and forth facing each other as the male searches for a suitable place to deposit his sperm. Flirting rituals can include a range of other behaviors, such as a cheesy kiss, where a man and a woman hold each other’s mouths.arbre droit(“vertical tree”), genital insertion in which partners raise their anus and rub their tails together, and the male inserts into the sela or mesoderm to subdue the female. The dance can last from a few minutes to several hours.[82][83]

When the male finds a suitable stable substrate, such as hard ground, agglomerated sand, rocks or bark, he deposits clumps of sperm and drives the female through it. This allows the sperm to enter the genital tract, triggering the release of sperm, thereby fertilizing the female. onemating plugit is then formed in the female to prevent the female from mating again before the offspring are born. The male and female then abruptly separate.[84][85] Cannibalismit has only been anecdotally reported in scorpions after mating.[eighty six]

Birth and development

Compsobuthus werneri

youth

GesturesIn some species, scorpions can live for more than a year.[eighty seven]they are two typesembryo development; apoicogenic and cathoicogenic. In the apoicogenic system, mainly found in Buthidae, embryos develop inside yolk-rich eggs.follicle. The cathoicogenic system is recognized in the families Hemiscorpiidae, Scorpionidae, and Diplocentridae and includes embryos that develop within a given time frame.diverticulumIt has a nipple-like structure for sucking.[88]Unlike most spiders, theythere are many eggshatching scorpions seem commonlive, with live cases.[89]They are unusual among terrestrial arthropods in the degree of care a female gives her offspring.[90]The size of the brood varies by species, from 3 to more than 100 fish.[91]Body size of scorpions is not related to parent size or life cycle length.[92]

Before birth, the female lifts the front part of her body and places her pedals and front legs under her back to retrieve the baby (“birth basket”). One by one, the offspring emerge from the genitals, pushing out the embryonic membranes, if any, and laid on the mother’s back, where they will remain until at least once passed.change skin. The period before the first molt is called the pre-mature stage; the child cannot suck or inject, butbloodsuckerthey kept their mothers in their tarsiers. This period lasts between 5 and 25 days, depending on the species. Parents molt simultaneously for the first time over a 6 to 8 hour period, marking the beginning of adolescence.[91]

adolescence orstarsoften similar to smaller adult versions with fully developed nodules, hairs and tips. They are still soft and lack pigment, so they continue to ride on their mother’s back for protection. They become harder and more pigmented over the next few days. They may temporarily leave their mother and return when they sense a potential danger. Once the exoskeleton is fully hardened, the cubs can hunt on their own and soon leave the mother.[ninety-three]A scorpion may molt an average of six times before reaching adulthood, and this may not happen until they are between 6 and 83 months old, depending on the species. Some species can live up to 25 years.[eighty seven]

Fluorescent

emperor scorpionPandinus emperorFluorescent

Scorpions glow bright blue-green when exposed to certain wavelength ranges.ultraviolet raya light as produced byblack light, becauseFluorescentchemicals such asbeta-carboninein the epidermis. Accordingly, handheld ultraviolet lamps have long been the standard tool for nocturnal field research for these animals. Occurs due to fluorescencesclerosisand an increase in intensity with each successive event.[ninety four]This fluorescent substance may have an active role in the light-sensing ability of the scorpion.[95]

relationships with people

Human use for scorpions

sinking

scorpionism

Arizona bark scorpion

Scorpion venom is used to quickly kill or paralyze prey. This burnOf the many nuisance species, only 25 have deadly venom. These species belong to the Buthidae family, which includes:Leiurus quinquestriatus,hot facespecies,centroroidsspp. andandroctonusspp.[34]with peopleallergyparticularly at risk;[96]if not,first aidTo behave symptoms, withpainkiller.Cases of very high blood pressuretreatment with drugsrelieve anxietyandrelax blood vessels.[97][98]Scorpio envy high morbidity and mortality rates, often too muchautonomous operationand cardiotoxic or neuromuscular effects.antidoteas a specific treatment for scorpion skin with supportive measures, including vasodilators, in patients with cardiovascular toxicity andbenzodiazepineswith neuromuscular involvement. Rarely serioushypersensitivity reactionincludinganaphylaxisso the scorpion can make antivenin.[99]

Scorpion stings are a public health concern, particularly in tropical and subtropical regions of the Americas, North Africa, the Middle East, and India. About 1.5 million scorpion infestations occur each year, with about 2,600 deaths.[one hundred][101][102]Mexico is one of the countries most affected by the epidemic.biodiversityabout 200,000 incidents and at least 300 deaths per year about scorpions around the world.[103][104]

Efforts are made to prevent invasions and control scorpion populations. Prevention includes personal activities such as checking shoes and clothes before putting them on, not walking barefoot or in sandals, and filling in holes and cracks where scorpions can nest. Street lighting reduces scorpion activity. May include the use of controlinsecticideaspyrethroidsor manually collect scorpions with the help of an ultraviolet light. Indoor scorpion predators such as chickens and turkeys can help reduce the risk to a household.[one hundred][101]

potential drug use

death chaseramino acidschlorotoxinsstrip diagramchloride channel

[105]

Scorpion venom is a mixture of neurotoxins; most of thempeptide, soap operaamino acids.[106]Many interferemembrane channelhe issodium transport,quality,calcium, orchlorideions. These channels are indispensable.nerve conduction,muscle contractionand many other biological processes. Some of these molecules could be useful in medical research and lead to the development of new disease treatments. Its potential therapeutic uses include pain relief,prevent cancer,antimicrobial,antifungal,antiviral,anti-parasitic,bradykinin- conjecture andimmunosuppressivedrugs. However, as of 2020, no drugs made from scorpion toxins have been offered for sale.chlorotoxinsbeing tested for use againstglioma, a brain cancer.[105]

Consumption

Scorpions are eaten by humans in West Africa and Myanmar[107]and East Asia. Fried scorpions are traditionallyShandong, Chinese.[108]There, scorpions can be prepared and eaten in a variety of ways, including roasted, fried, grilled, raw or raw. The venom is usually not removed, as direct and sustained heat will counteract the harmful effects of the venom.[109]In Thailand, scorpions are not eaten as often as other arthropods such as grasshoppers, but they are sometimes fried as street food.[110]They are used in Vietnam to makesnake wine(scorpion wine).[111]

pet

Scorpions are often kept as pets. Their maintenance is relatively simple, the basic requirements are a safe coating such as glass.terrariumHave a ziplock cover and suitable temperature and humidity for the selected species, which usually means installing a heating pad and spraying some water regularly. The substrate should be similar to the substrate of the species’ natural environment, for examplepeatfor forest species orbee stonesand for desert species to nest. scorpion on limbspandinusandheteropigmentationobedient enough to handle. A bigpandinuscan consume up to threecricketevery week.cannibalIt is more common in captivity than in the wild and can be minimized in the enclosure by providing plenty of small shelter and providing ample prey.[112][113]The pet trade especially threatens wild populations of various scorpion species.androctonus australisandPandinus emperor.[114]

Cultural

  • Late Isis-Serket bronze
  • “The Fight of Scorpions and Snakes”, Anglo-Saxon Herbal, c. 1050
  • Scorpio constellation identified as “Scorpio” in Urania’s Mirror, London, c. 1825
  • A scorpion motif (two types shown) is often woven into plain Turkish kilim rugs to protect them from their needles. [115]

The scorpion is a culturally important animal.motifin art, especiallyIslamic artin the Middle East.[116]onescorpion patternusually speaking TurkishrugFlat mats to protect them from stings.[115]Scorpions are considered the embodiment of evil and a protective force.dervishpower to fight evil.[116]Scorpion in Islamic folklorehuman sexuality.[116]Scorpions are usedfolk remedyin South Asia, especiallyantidotefor scorpion sting.[116]

One of the earliest appearances of the scorpion in the environment was its inclusion as a scorpion.Scorpion, at 12ZodiacthroughBabylonian astronomersduring that timeChaldean period. This was later done by the West.astrology; In astronomy, the corresponding constellation is named.Scorpion.[117]InAncient Egypt, goddesssparrow, who protectedpharaoh, often depicted as a scorpion.[118]Inancient Greek, a warrior’s shield sometimes carries a scorpion device as seen.red potteryFrom the 5th century BC.[119]InGreek mythology,Artemisor Gaiasend a giant scorpion to kill the predatoronionThe one who said he would kill all the animals in the world. They became the constellations Orion and Scorpio; They are placed on opposite sides of the world as enemies, so when one takes to the sky, the other will appear.[120][121]Scorpio is mentionedHoly bookandTalmudas a symbol of danger and evil.[121]

This fairy talesbetweenScorpion and FrogIt has been interpreted to show that cruel people cannot avoid hurting others, even if it is not to their advantage.[122]More recently, actionJohn Steinbeck1947 novelpearlIt revolves around a pearl-poor fisherman’s attempt to save his infant son from a scorpion sting, but ends up losing him to human violence.[123]Scorpions have appeared equally in Western art forms, including film and poetry:surrealist movie makers Luis BuñuelHe used the scorpion symbol in his 1930s classicage d’or(Golden age),[124]durationStevie SmithThe name of my last poetry bookScorpions and other poems.[125]ManyMartial artsMovies and video games are licensedthe Scorpion King.[126][127][128]

Scorpio Poseyoga

[129]

Fromclassical timesThe scorpion with its powerful sting was used to give the weapon its name. insideRoman Army,ScorpionIt is a torsion siege engine used to fire projectiles.[130]british armyScorpion FV101an armored or light reconnaissance vehicletankHe served from 1972 to 1994.[131]a versionMatilda IIa tank equipped withbangingto deletemine , named Scorpio Matilda.[132]some shipsof the Royal Navyandof the United States Navynamedscorpionincluding18. weaponin 1803[133] tower shipin 1863[134] patrol yachtin 1898,[135] a destroyerin 1910[136]andnuclear submarinein 1960.[137]

The scorpion has been the name or symbol of products and brands, including Italian.abarthRace car[138]and oneMontesarivalmotorcycle.[139]balancing the hands or forearmsasanasin modern timesyoga like exercisea curved back and one or both legs pointing forward over the head in a scorpion tail pattern known asScorpio Pose.[140][129]

note

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Source

  • Police, Gary (1990). Biology of Scorpions. Stanford University Press. ISBN 978-0-8047-1249-1. OCLC 18991506.
  • Stockmann, Roland; Ythier, Eric (2010). Scorpions of the world. N.A.P. versions. ISBN 978-2913688117.
  • Stockmann, Roland (2015). “Introduction to Scorpion Biology and Ecology”. in Gopalakrishnakone, P.; Possani, L.; F. Schwartz, E.; Rodriguez de la Vega, R. (editor). Poison scorpion. springer pages 25-59. ISBN 978-94-007-6403-3.

external link

  • American Museum of Natural History – Scorpion Systematic Study Group
  • CDC – Insects and Scorpions – NIOSH Workplace Health and Safety Issues

Video tutorials about how many legs does a scorpion have

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Scorpions are arachnids and have eight legs—just like spiders! Learn more amazing facts about the scorpion in this video from National Geographic Kids.

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From the class of arachnids, we’re going to talk now about scorpions and the many, many different types of them that we find throughout the planet. In front of me is the emperor scorpion, which is the largest scorpion of the approximately 1,700 species that inhabit our world. Some of them you have to really be careful with because of the toxic nature. They’re all venomous creatures, and they deliver their venom through a stinger that’s located in their tail. But of those 1,700, usually what I always tell, the guys with the big, meaty claws, they have a very, very mild venom. If they have a little, thin claw, that’s the one you’ve got to be careful.

Nature would give a scorpion with a thin claw a more powerful to subdue its prey, where these big guys grab their prey with the claws, and most times they can dispatch an animal just with those. If they need the venom, over it comes. The tail flies over the top of its body, and sting, sting, sting. They will sting the prey that’s being held in their grasp. Oftentimes though the claws are enough. They’re almost crablike. If you could reach out here, if you were with me, and feel it, it feels like a crab or a lobster body on the top. Why?

Because all scorpions have an exoskeleton, their skeleton on the outside of their body. Because they are arachnid, of course, they have eight legs, much like spiders, tarantulas, ticks, and the like. That’s the family they come from. Little teeny tiny eyes. Nocturnal hunters for the most part. Don’t come into play, the eyes, very much. but if you can get a closeup of the claws here, if I can get him to stop moving. I might let him bite me just for fun. There you go. Grab me with your claws. That slows them down. One his claws are a whole bunch of hairs, and different scorpions have different lengths of hairs.

But they use them almost like a cat uses its whiskers. So they’re walking around in the desert or the forest at night, and they’ll touch those hairs against something, and they try to figure out if its friend or foe. Is it something that’s going to attack them? Or something that maybe they can make a meal out of, or something they don’t have to worry about, like a stick or a rock. They’re not really looking with their eyes very much. And that is how they go about life. We see them mostly around the equator, but some of them go way up north, like into the southern part of Canada and all the way into Australia. We’ll see all kinds of scorpion species.

So a very successful animal, one that’s feared, again due to mostly lack of knowledge. Like many creatures like it are, they’re unknown, but the more you interface with them, you’ll find they sometimes make really entertaining captive subjects because they look pretty menacing. That’s a great conversation piece if you want to have that in your house. The scorpions from the arachnid group.

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