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The Republic of the Río Grande – Webb County Heritage …

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  • Summary: Articles about The Republic of the Río Grande – Webb County Heritage … On January 7, 1840, the Republic of the Rio Grande was proclaimed by constitutional convention and Laredo was named its capital. A small structure across the …

  • Match the search results: The story of an independent republic, declared and fought over during the span of ten months in 1840, begins years before that in the political and social turmoil that embroiled Mexico and its vast geographical domain. Repudiated by Mexican historians and validated in the writings of Texian and Amer…

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Republic of the Rio Grande – Texas State Historical Association

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  • Summary: Articles about Republic of the Rio Grande – Texas State Historical Association Republic of the Rio Grande.The Republic of the Rio Grande was an effort on the part of Federalist leaders in Tamaulipas, Nuevo Leon, …

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Republic of the Rio Grande | Tropical Trail Region

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  • Summary: Articles about Republic of the Rio Grande | Tropical Trail Region The Rio Grande Valley, home to balmy weather, subtropical species, and lots of wintering Texans, spent a brief period of time as a renegade Mexican nation.

  • Match the search results: The Rio Grande Valley, home to balmy weather, subtropical species, and lots of wintering Texans, spent a brief period of time as a renegade Mexican nation. Although never fully recognized (a condition not unfamiliar to the neighboring members of the Republic of Texas who were engaged in their own ba…

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Searching for the Republic of the Rio Grande: Northern …

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  • Summary: Articles about Searching for the Republic of the Rio Grande: Northern … Searching for the Republic of the Rio Grande: Northern Mexico and Texas, 1838–1840 [Lack, Paul D.] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

  • Match the search results: In that regard, this inconclusive regional revolt had many precursive elements to the aggression of the United States that resulted in war against Mexico from 1845 to 1848, fulfilling the imperial dreams previously uttered by Anglo Texans during this federalist revolt of 1838–1840. Searching for the…

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From the Republic of the Rio Grande: A Personal History of …

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  • Summary: Articles about From the Republic of the Rio Grande: A Personal History of … From the Republic of the Rio Grande: A Personal History of the Place and the People (Jack and Doris Smothers Series in Texas History, Life, and Culture) [de …

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De-Mythifying the Lesser-Known Story of the Republic of the …

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  • Summary: Articles about De-Mythifying the Lesser-Known Story of the Republic of the … The Republic of the Rio Grande was a dramatic independence movement in northeast Mexico and far south Texas that lasted from 1838 to 1840.

  • Match the search results: Lately, he’s not the only one reconsidering the so-called Republic of the Rio Grande, the dramatic independence movement in northeast Mexico and far south Texas that lasted from 1838 to 1840. A new book, Searching for the Republic of the Rio Grande by Paul D. Lack, comes out Feb. 23; and in the spri…

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Rio Grande Republic Flag – Flagsonline

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  • Summary: Articles about Rio Grande Republic Flag – Flagsonline The official flag of the Republic of the Rio Grande. This nation was short-lived, from 17 January to 6 November 1840. The Republic of the Rio Grande there was …

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From the Republic of the Rio Grande: A Personal History of …

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  • Summary: Articles about From the Republic of the Rio Grande: A Personal History of … The Republic of the Rio Grande had a brief and tenuous existence (1838-1840) before most of it was reabsorbed by Mexico and the remainder annexed by the …

  • Match the search results: The Republic of the Rio Grande had a brief and tenuous existence (1838-1840) before most of it was reabsorbed by Mexico and the remainder annexed by the United States, yet this region that straddles the Rio Grande has retained its distinctive cultural identity to the present day. Born on one side of…

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The Rio Grande Republic Museum building in Laredo is said to have been used as the capital of the Republic. Photo courtesy of Museum of the Rio Grande Republic.

“This is going to be such a great miniseries one day, isn’t it?” Push Brandon Seal on the eighth episode of the podcast”Republic of Rio Grande. As the host and creator of the lively and rudimentary 17-episode series, Seale does her job asPresident of Howard Energy Partners based in San Antonioand assume the role of a cutting-edge historian to delve into this little-known chapter of Mexican-Texan history.

Lately, he’s not the only one rethinking the so-called Republic of the Rio Grande, the powerful independence movement in northeastern Mexico and far south Texas that lasted from 1838 to 1840. A new book.In search of the Republic of Rio Grandeby Paul D. Missing, published February 23; and in spring LaredosMuseum of the Rio Grande Republic- Located in a building traditionally considered the capital of the Republic – opens a new exhibition that further uncovers the story.

Margarita Araiza, executive director of the Webb County Heritage Foundation, which maintains the museum and preserves other archival and historical documents, along with bilingual audio and interactive features, as well as similar features such as bilingual writing and audio and diorama, said material for Laredo and Webb counties.

registrationTexas Expressway

According to Lack, a McMurry University professor emeritus, the Republic of Rio Grande is “a complicated story” that he spent several years researching on a research grant.

“The grant allows me to visit archives in the states of Nuevo Leon and Coahuila that, to my knowledge, have not previously been consulted by scholars on the subject,” he said in an email. “I also have access to the original Mexican military files because the government digitized them in their biennial (2021) honor.”

If the story is complicated, Seale adds, it’s a story worth reading. “The uprising is part of a long and often disappointing history of northern Mexicans trying to maintain their autonomy in building a larger Mexican nation,” he explains. “It serves, however, as a useful prism through which we can revisit the Texan Revolution of 1835-36, for all its similarity to the Texan insurrection, and in some ways it is important that it is different.”

The independence movement grew as Mexican citizens in the northeastern states of Coahuila, Nuevo Leon, and Tamaulipas were dissatisfied that the government in Mexico City gave them little protection against Lipan, Apache, and Comanche attacks. Sky-high tariffs and other trade restrictions also make life on the northern border difficult. And because it is unclear whetherBattle of San Jacintoactually settled things between Texas and Mexico, much of the Mexican army lived in villas on the Rio Grande and requisitioned goods and provisions without pay.

Federalists, like the revolutionaries, called for stronger local government, increased their activities against centralists, or supporters of a politically stronger central government, after Mexico’s Congress repealed the 1824 constitution that supported federalist views. In November 1838, Tamaulipas legislature enacted Antonio Canales, who had become the political leader of the Rio Grande ConfederacyAngelagainst the Centralists in Guerrero, a mansion that’s now considered an atmospheric ghost townGuerrero Viejo, on the south coast ofFalcon International Reservoir.

Similar claims echoed across the region. In early 1839, the citizens of Laredo celebrated their proclamation with eight bells ringing, cheers, and gunfire. While the Rio Grande was not formally established as the border between Texas and Mexico until the end of the Mexican-American War in 1848, the interstate movement that covered much of South Texas was called upon to do soWild horse desert.

Skirmishes and fighting broke out between Union and Mexican forces throughout Coahuila, Nuevo Leon, and Tamaulipas. Along with the citizens of these states, the Carrizo Indians took up arms for the Union cause, as did wealthy Anglo-Texans and Tejano soldiers. While Texas President Mirabeau Lamar refused to support the insurgency, he did allow Canales to set up a recruiting station on the grounds of the US Capitol in Austin. And early in 1840 Canales called for a confederation to be held on the south bank of the Nueces River in a village called TexasCasa Blanca.

The meeting established an interim government for northeastern Mexico with Laredo as its capital. But as Seale points out on his podcast, Guerrero became the de facto seat of short-lived government because the mansion owned a printing shop.

Canales was appointed commander-in-chief of the fledgling regime, but the Confederacy’s bravest and most resilient fighter was Antonio Zapata, who was appointed by Canales to command the combined forces of the insurrection. Born in Revilla (renamed Guerrero after Mexico’s independence) in 1797, Zapata was a regional figure known for his skill in the saddle and bravery in battle. Indians called himManteca sombrero,or for his shiny hair or the way his sweat makes his hair sparkle. “Chasing Zapata,” Seale said, “is like chasing the wind, except in this case the wind is blowing against it.”

And he was motivated to fight for the Union cause. Zapata, a successful cattle rancher with a posh house in Guerrero’s central square, had all possessions on his land — some 20,000 acres, tens of thousands of pesos, even human jewelry — confiscated by the central government in 1838. According to at least one source, his name went in in the spring of 1840 entered the frontier legends when he surrendered to General Mariano Arista, commander of the Army of Northern Mexico, after his small force was defeated in combat with the Central Army at Santa Rita de Morelos.

Arista gave Zapata the choice between abandoning the Federation cause and being executed. He chose death. Central forces escorted Zapata’s head, preserved in a brandy cask, past Laredo and back to Guerrero, where it was placed on a stake in the plaza. Later that year, in 1840, the rebellion ceased to exist.

Missing was no joke as he called it “a complicated story.” But he and many other historians questioned the official existence of the republic.

First appeared in an academic account of the romantically named Republic of the Rio Grande, possibly in the 1847 episodeMexican history : its civil war, a chronicle of the revolution and the colonial days; From the Spanish conquest in 1520 to the present in 1847by Philip Jung. However, skepticism began with a 1986 article by Mexican historian Josefina Zoraida Vázquez, who “claimed that the Republic of the Rio Grande never worked,” explains Lack, pointing out that she went so far as to use a Spanish word, which can be translated as “so-called” in the title of the article, “La supuesta Republica del Rio Grande.”

“My findings,” Lack said, “confirm their view that the Rio Grande Republic name was created in Texas and never used in Mexico itself.”

Still, as Seale said on his podcast, this story has all the textures of a great miniseries. And another person had the same idea: About 20 years ago when I visited themZapata County Historical Museum- In the county named after Antonio Zapata in 1858 – the curator Evaristo Botello showed me a thick book about the production of a filmManteca sombrero.Asked today, nobody seems to have heard of the project, but maybe it’s still out there somewhere, windswept looks.

Subscribe to the Republic of the Rio Grande podcast at sanantonioreport.org. New episodes are available every Wednesday, the latest episode is titled number 13″Battle of Morelos. “

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We are all familiar with the flags of the six independent nations that have flown and waved in the wind over Texas.

But history shows there was a seventh flag – the flag of the Republic of the Rio Grande.

The Republic of the Rio Grande was a short-lived independent nation that formed in northern Mexico and South Texas in 1840.

Antonio Canales, a Federalist legislator from Guerrero, spoke out against the Centralist government of Mexico in November 1838, calling for the formation of a republic to oppose Mexico.

The always independently spirited people of Laredo followed suit in early 1839 with their own “pronunciamento” that was accompanied by a fiesta that lasted into the wee hours of the morning.

Canales was named commander of the Army of the Republic of the Rio Grande. Most of South Texas fell within the borders of the fledgling republic.

Laredo was named is capital. A building adjacent to what is now La Posada hotel in the historic San Agustin downtown area of Laredo served as the capitol. It has been restored and serves as a museum open to the public.

The Republic of the Rio Grande’s army was composed mainly of large landowners and their vaqueros from northeast Mexico and South Texas. Canales was joined by legendary freedom fighter Antonio Zapata, a charismatic “mulatto (of African and Indian blood)” from Guerrero.

Captain Jose Maria Benavides, a three-term mayor of Revilla and captain of the garrison there, joined the Republic of the Rio Grande. Benavides was from the Hebbronville area and his descendants Isidro B. Gutierrez and Marta Gutierrez sill live in the area.

The Federalists soon gained the advantage and the Republic of the Rio Grande troops fled north. Some of them hid in Fort Lipantitlan located in northwest Nueces Count.

Zapata was captured and chose death. Canales was captured and surrendered and soon the Republic of the Rio Grande’s uprising was over. But for a short while, a seventh flag flew over parts of Texas. The rebellion lasted from January 17 to November 6, 1840.

A state historical marker stands in front of the museum located in San Agustin Plaza in Laredo proclaiming it the capitol building of the ill-fated republic.

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In the early days after the Mexican revolution, something uniquely Texan happened in Texas: it tried to become indendent from itself!

from wikipedia: “The Republic of the Rio Grande (Spanish: República del Río Grande) was an independent nation that insurgents against the Central Mexican Government sought to establish in northern Mexico. The rebellion lasted from January 17 to November 6, 1840 and the Republic of the Rio Grande was never officially recognized.”

Joseph of The Fox Cousins breaks it down.

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