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Armenians in the Middle East – Wikipedia

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  • Summary: Articles about Armenians in the Middle East – Wikipedia Armenians in the Middle East are mostly concentrated in Iran, Lebanon, Cyprus, Syria, Jordan and Jerusalem, although well-established communities exist in …

  • Match the search results: From the 16th century until 1828, all of Eastern Armenia, which includes all of the modern-day Armenia, were part of Qajar Iran, alongside the rest of Transcaucasia and parts of the North Caucasus. As a result of the Treaty of Turkmenchay, Iran irrevocably lost Eastern Armenia to neighbouring Imperi…

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Armenians in the Middle East | Encyclopedia.com

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  • Summary: Articles about Armenians in the Middle East | Encyclopedia.com Armenians in the diaspora are concentrated in cities throughout the Middle East, Europe, and North and South America. An estimated half million or more live in …

  • Match the search results: The territory of historic Armenia covered the Armenian plateau. The Pontic range on the north, the Little Caucasus chain to the east, the Anti-Taurus range to the south, and the Euphrates River in the west defined its perimeter. Armenian settlement in the area dates back at least to the second half …

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The Armenians in the Middle East – TeachMideast

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  • Summary: Articles about The Armenians in the Middle East – TeachMideast Another Christian community in the region is that of the Armenians, with significant numbers in Turkey and Lebanon. In Lebanon, some 180,000 Armenians live …

  • Match the search results: From Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East
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    Electronically reproduced by permission of Pearson Education, Inc., Upper Saddle River, New Jersey.

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Where Is Armenia in Europe? – Byevisa.com

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  • Summary: Articles about Where Is Armenia in Europe? – Byevisa.com To describe where Armenia is, we could say that it’s on the easternmost edge of Europe, bordering the Middle East. It only borders 2 partly European …

  • Match the search results: To describe where Armenia is, we could say that it’s on the easternmost edge of Europe, bordering the Middle East. It only borders 2 partly European countries, which are Turkey to the west and Georgia to the north, which in some respects are European while in others they’re considered part of Asia.

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Armenia | Middle East Policy Council

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  • Summary: Articles about Armenia | Middle East Policy Council Turkey’s Involvement in the Armenia-Azerbaijan Conflict Risks Destabilizing the Middle East … Turkey’s foreign entanglements and military adventures are once …

  • Match the search results: The Middle East Policy Council is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to contribute to American understanding of the political, economic and cultural issues that affect U.S. interests in the Middle East.

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Azerbaijan-Armenia conflict | Middle East Eye

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  • Summary: Articles about Azerbaijan-Armenia conflict | Middle East Eye Turkish-Armenian normalisation gathers pace as Ankara expects gradual success. Encouraged by Prime Minister Pashinyan’s reelection, Turkish officials aim to …

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How the Armenians came to live among Arabs – Al Jazeera

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  • Summary: Articles about How the Armenians came to live among Arabs – Al Jazeera The Arab communities who helped Armenian refugees 100 years ago are … Arab Middle East have long recognised what the Armenians suffered.

  • Match the search results: The pope and the European Parliament recently urged the Turkish government to recognise the Armenian mass killings as “genocide”, while others – including the US – have stopped short of using the term and called for a “full, frank” recognition of historical facts. But it is worth remembering that th…

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Armenia | Middle East Institute

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  • Summary: Articles about Armenia | Middle East Institute Fragile promise: The prospects for Turkish-Armenian normalization. Feb 17, 2022 … Iran’s strong hand in the Arab world is missing in the Caucasus.

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Fragile promise: The prospects for Turkish-Armenian …

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  • Summary: Articles about Fragile promise: The prospects for Turkish-Armenian … Now, after decades of animosity, Turkey and Armenia are taking steps to … Iran’s strong hand in the Arab world is missing in the Caucasus.

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Multi-read content is armenia in the middle east

Another Christian community in the region are the Armenians, with significant numbers in Turkey and Lebanon. About 180,000 Armenians live in Lebanon, mostly in the Burj Hammoud district of Beirut. Many remained in civil wars in North America, Europe, or the newly independent Republic of Armenia that arose after the collapse of the Soviet Union. While the majority belong to the Armenian Orthodox Church, small groups are Roman Catholic and Protestant. Armenians who fled to Lebanon at the end of World War I were granted citizenship under the French coercive regime in 1939. The Armenian population of Lebanon and the approximately 60,000 Armenian citizens of Turkey, 50,000 of whom live in Istanbul, are part of a diaspora that includes approximately 3.5 million people in the newly independent Republic of Armenia and 1 million people in the United States and Canada , and about 400,000 in France.

The Armenian community used to be the most important and influential communitymilletof the Ottoman Empire and during its long history advisors to the Ottoman court and made an active contribution to the commercial and intellectual life of the empire. The total population of Armenians in Anatolia at the turn of the century was estimated at 1.8 million, with the majority living in villages in the central and eastern regions. In the steppes and mountains of Anatolia, Armenian villages alternate with those of Kurds, Turkmen and other Muslim and Christian groups. Thatmilletitself was traditionally headed by a patriarch, confirmed by the Ottoman sultan and often elected by influential clergy and some wealthy urban families.

In the 19th century the Armeniansmilletexperienced similar economic and political changes to the rest of Ottoman society, including the rise of nationalism that fueled secessionist movements by Greeks and Balkan Christians in the peninsula. Caught between Anglo-Russian rivalry and the desire for internal reforms of many Armenians,milletbecame partisan and heavily politicized. The traditional leadership is opposed by those who, with the support of one or another European power, are trying to secure further political advantages or even establish an independent Armenia. Under the influence of the French Revolution and particularly the revolutionary movement of 1830 and 1848 in Europe, young Armenian activists founded two socialist revolutionary parties, Hunchakian and Dashnak. The first, founded in Geneva in 1887, called for full political independence; the second, founded in Tiflis in 1890, supported reforms under the Ottoman Empire.

In response to the threat posed by the Armenian revolutionary movements, government-backed militias attacked several Armenian communities. The period from 1894 to 1916 was marked by numerous interregional conflicts, repeated attacks on Armenian villages and wars against the Armenians. European powers continued to interfere in Ottoman internal affairs, contributing to the widening rift between Muslim and Christian communities. The French, British, and Russian consulates regularly issued passports to Christian subjects of the Ottoman Empire, provided money to dissidents, and encouraged Greek and Greek nationalist aspirations.

During World War I and shortly after the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire, mass expulsions, forced displacement, and even a significant number of famines eventually led to the annihilation of almost all Armenians from rural Anatolia. The ill-advised attempt to establish an Armenian republic in south-eastern Turkey after World War I resulted in massacres and forced migration of the last remaining Armenian rural areas from Turkey. Thousands fled to Lebanon and Syria. After World War II, about 40,000 Armenians left Lebanon and Syria and immigrated to Soviet Armenia, but the rest stayed in Lebanon, where they form a strongly cohesive ethnic community today.

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Thomas Gorguissian, a journalist and analyst, talks about Armenians’ changing expectations of the New Middle East, and how a Middle East devoid of Armenians might impact Armenia’s foreign policy.

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The clashes between Armenian and Azerbaijani forces over the disputed territory of Nagorno-Karabakh has drawn in several Middle Eastern countries. Here’s what’s happening and why.

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In 1921 Soviets merged the ethnic Armenian territory with Azerbaijan. After 1991 Soviet collapse, Armenian separatists seized the territory. In April 2016, 110 people were killed in the most serious fighting in years. In the recent clashes, Azerbaijan and Armenia have blamed each other. | NewsX

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Armenians

Historically, the name Armenian has come to internationally designate this group of people. It was first used by neighbouring countries of ancient Armenia. The earliest attestations of the exonym Armenia date around the 6th century BC. In his trilingual Behistun Inscription dated to 517 BC, Darius I the Great of Persia refers to Urashtu (in Babylonian) as Armina (in Old Persian) and Harminuya (in Elamite). In Greek, Αρμένιοι “Armenians” is attested from about the same time, perhaps the earliest reference being a fragment attributed to Hecataeus of Miletus (476 BC).

Armenians call themselves Hay. The word has traditionally been linked to the name of the legendary founder of the Armenian nation, Hayk, which is also a popular Armenian given name. It is also further postulated that the name Hay comes from one of the two confederated, Hittite vassal states—the Ḫayaša-Azzi (1600–1200 BC).

Movses Khorenatsi, the important early medieval Armenian historian, wrote that the word Armenian originated from the name Armenak or Aram (the descendant of Hayk).

Origin

The Armenian Highland lies in the highlands surrounding Mount Ararat, the highest peak of the region. In the Bronze Age, several states flourished in the area of Greater Armenia, including the Hittite Empire (at the height of its power), Mitanni (South-Western historical Armenia), and Hayasa-Azzi (1600–1200 BC). Soon after Hayasa-Azzi were the Nairi (1400–1000 BC) and the Kingdom of Urartu (1000–600 BC), who successively established their sovereignty over the Armenian Highland. Each of the aforementioned nations and tribes participated in the ethnogenesis of the Armenian people. Yerevan, the modern capital of Armenia, was founded in 782 BC by king Argishti I. A minority view also suggests that the Indo-European homeland may have been located in the Armenian Highland.

Eric P. Hamp in his 2012 Indo-European family tree, groups the Armenian language along with Greek and Ancient Macedonian (“Helleno-Macedonian”) in the Pontic Indo-European (also called Helleno-Armenian) subgroup.

Antiquity

The first state that was called Armenia by neighboring peoples (such as by Hecataeus of Miletus and on the Achaemenid Behistun Inscription) was established in the early 6th century BC under the Orontid dynasty, which later became a kingdom. At its zenith (95–65 BC), the state extended from the Caucasus all the way to what is now central Turkey, Lebanon, and northern Iran. The imperial reign of Tigranes the Great is thus the span of time during which Armenia itself conquered areas populated by other peoples. Later it briefly became part of the Roman Empire (AD 114–118).

The Arsacid Kingdom of Armenia was the first state to adopt Christianity as its religion (it had formerly been adherent to Iranian and Hellenistic paganism – Zoroastrianism, the Ancient Greek religion and then the Ancient Roman religion). in the early years of the 4th century, likely AD 301. Later on, in order to further strengthen Armenian national identity, Mesrop Mashtots invented the Armenian alphabet, in 405 AD. This event ushered the Golden Age of Armenia, during which many foreign books and manuscripts were translated to Armenian by Mesrop’s pupils. Armenia lost its sovereignty for the first time in 428 AD to the Byzantine and Persian empires.

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