Best 9 part of the brain the controls emotions

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Emotions and the Brain – Or How to Master “The Force”

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  • Summary: Articles about Emotions and the Brain – Or How to Master “The Force” The prefrontal cortex is like a control center, helping to guide our actions, and therefore, this area is also involved during emotion …

  • Match the search results: Using MRI cameras, scientists have shown that emotions are processed by many different areas of the brain. There is not just one place that is responsible for processing an emotion. Several brain regions work together as a team. This is why scientists say that emotions are processed by a network of …

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The emotion centre is the oldest part of the human brain – The …

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  • Summary: Articles about The emotion centre is the oldest part of the human brain – The … The limbic system sits under the cerebrum (the largest and newest part of the brain) and is made up of structures such as the hypothalamus, …

  • Match the search results: The brain is key to our existence, but there’s a long way to go before neuroscience can truly capture its staggering capacity. For now, though, our Brain Control series explores what we do know about the brain’s command of six central functions: language, mood, memory, vision, personality and motor …

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4.2 Our Brains Control Our Thoughts, Feelings, and Behaviour

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  • Summary: Articles about 4.2 Our Brains Control Our Thoughts, Feelings, and Behaviour The limbic system is a brain area, located between the brain stem and the two cerebral hemispheres, that governs emotion and memory. It includes the amygdala, …

  • Match the search results: If you were someone who understood brain anatomy and were to look at the brain of an animal that you had never seen before, you would nevertheless be able to deduce the likely capacities of the animal. This is because the brains of all animals are very similar in overall form. In each animal the bra…

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Left, right and center: mapping emotion in the brain

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  • Summary: Articles about Left, right and center: mapping emotion in the brain The neural system for emotions linked to approaching and engaging with the world – like happiness, pride and anger – lives in the left side of …

  • Match the search results: Since the 1970s, hundreds of studies have suggested that each hemisphere of the brain is home to a specific type of emotion. The neural system for emotions linked to approaching and engaging with the world – like happiness, pride and anger – lives in the left side of the brain, while emotions associ…

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The Anatomy of Emotions – BrainFacts

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  • Summary: Articles about The Anatomy of Emotions – BrainFacts A paired, almond-shaped structure deep within the brain, the amygdala integrates emotions, emotional behavior, and motivation. It interprets …

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    Three brain structures appear most closely linked with emotions: the amygdala, the insula or insular cortex, and a structure in the midbrain called the periaqueductal gray.

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Brain Anatomy and Limbic System | BrightFocus Foundation

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  • Summary: Articles about Brain Anatomy and Limbic System | BrightFocus Foundation Amygdala: Limbic structure involved in many brain functions, including emotion, learning and memory. It is part of a system that processes …

  • Match the search results: The image on the left is a side view of the outside of the brain, showing the major lobes (frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital) and the brain stem structures (pons, medulla oblongata, and cerebellum).

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Brain Anatomy and Limbic System | BrightFocus Foundation

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  • Summary: Articles about Brain Anatomy and Limbic System | BrightFocus Foundation Amygdala: Limbic structure involved in many brain functions, including emotion, learning and memory. It is part of a system that processes …

  • Match the search results: The image on the left is a side view of the outside of the brain, showing the major lobes (frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital) and the brain stem structures (pons, medulla oblongata, and cerebellum).

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What Part of Brain Controls Emotions? And How Does …

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  • Summary: Articles about What Part of Brain Controls Emotions? And How Does … The limbic brain controls emotions and influences the endocrine (hormonal) system and the autonomic nervous system.

  • Match the search results: According to the Triune Brain theory, these three distinct areas of the brain can be thought of as three brains in one:

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The Anatomy of Emotions – BrainFacts

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  • Summary: Articles about The Anatomy of Emotions – BrainFacts A paired, almond-shaped structure deep within the brain, the amygdala integrates emotions, emotional behavior, and motivation. It interprets …

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    Three brain structures appear most closely linked with emotions: the amygdala, the insula or insular cortex, and a structure in the midbrain called the periaqueductal gray.

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Multi-read content part of the brain the controls emotions

Chapter 4. The Brain, the Body, and Behavior

4.2 Our brain controls our thoughts, emotions and behavior

learning goals

  1. Describe the structure and function of the “old brain” and its influence on behavior.
  2. Explain the structure of the cerebral cortex (the hemispheres and their lobes) and the function of each region of the cerebral cortex.
  3. Define the concepts of brain plasticity, neurogenesis, and brain formation.

If you’re someone who understands brain anatomy and looks at the brain of an animal that you’ve never seen before, you can still deduce the animal’s abilities. This is because the brains of all animals are very similar in overall appearance. The brain of each animal species has many layers, and the basic brain structures are similar (see Figure 4.5, “Main structures in the human brain”). The innermost structures of the brain—the parts closest to the spinal cord—are the oldest part of the brain, and these regions perform the same functions as our distant ancestors. The “old brain” regulates basic survival functions such as breathing, movement, rest, and feeding, and creates our emotional experiences. Mammals, including humans, have evolved additional layers of the brain that provide more advanced functions — like better memory, more complex social interactions, and the ability to experience emotions. Humans have a very large and highly developed outer layer called thecortical(see Figure 4.6, “Cortices”), making us particularly adept at these processes.

The many lobes and parts of the brain.Figure 4.5 Main structures in the human brain.

""Figure 4.6 Cerebral cortex. Humans have a very large and highly developed outer layer of the brain called the cerebral cortex. The cerebral cortex provides humans with excellent memory, superior cognitive abilities, and the ability to experience complex emotions.

The Old Brain: Wired for Survival

ThatbrainstemTo bethe innermost and oldest region of the brain. It was designed to control life’s most basic functions, including breathing, attention, and motor responses (Figure 4.7, “Brainstem and Thalamus”). The brainstem begins where the spinal cord enters and forms in the skullmark,the area of ​​the brainstem that controls heart rate and breathing. In many cases, the spinal cord alone is sufficient to sustain life—animals whose brains remain above the spinal cord can still eat, breathe, and even move. The ball above the pulp ispontine,a structure in the brainstem that helps control body movements; is particularly important for balance and walking.

A long and narrow network of neurons runs through the medulla and pons.calledlattice formation. The reticular formation has the task of filtering out part of the stimuli that reach the brain from the spinal cord and forwarding the rest of the signals to other regions of the brain. The reticular formation also plays an important role in walking, eating, sexual activity, and sleeping. When electrical stimulation is applied to an animal’s reticular formation, it is immediately fully awake, and when the reticular formation is cut off from higher brain regions, the animal falls into a deep coma.

""Figure 4.7 Brain stem and thalamus. The brainstem is an extension of the spinal cord, including the spinal cord, pons, thalamus, and reticular formation.

Above the brain stem are other parts of the old brain that are also involved in behavior and emotion processing (see Figure 4.8, Limbic system). ThathillTo bethe egg-shaped structure above the brainstem that filters more sensory information coming from the spinal cord and through the reticular formation and relays some of that residual signal to higher levels of the brain(Sheman

""Figure 4.8 Limbic system. This diagram shows the major parts of the limbic system and the pituitary gland that it controls.

Thatcerebellum(literally “little brain”)consists of two wrinkled ovals behind the brainstem. It has the function of coordinating the voluntary movement. People with cerebellar lesions have difficulty walking, balancing, and holding hands. Drinking affects the cerebellum, which is why intoxicated people have more trouble walking straight. In addition, the cerebellum contributes to emotional responses, helps us distinguish between different sounds and textures, and is important in learning (Bower

While the main function of the brainstem is to regulate the most basic aspects of life, including motor functions,limbic systemis largely responsible for memory and emotions, including our responses to rewards and punishments. Thatlimbic systemTo bean area of ​​the brain located between the brainstem and the two cerebral hemispheres that controls emotions and memory.It includes the amygdala, hypothalamus and hippocampus.

Thatamygdala consists of two “almond-shaped” phrases (amygdala comes from the Latin word for “almond”) and is primarily responsible for regulating our perception and responses to aggression and fear.. The amygdala has connections to other body systems involved in fear, including the sympathetic nervous system (which we’ll see later is important in the fear response), facial responses (perceiving and expressing emotions), olfactory processing, and neurotransmitter release. associated with stress and aggression (Best, 2009). In an early study, Klüver and Bucy (1939) damaged the amygdala of an aggressive rhesus monkey. They found that the once angry animal immediately became passive and no longer responded to fearful situations with aggressive behavior. Electrical stimulation of the amygdala in other animals also has an effect on aggression. The amygdala not only helps us experience fear, but also helps us learn from situations that create fear. When we experience dangerous events, the amygdala stimulates the brain to remember the details of the situation so we can learn to avoid them in the future (Sigurdsson, Doyère, Cain,

Located just below the hill (hence the name),hypothalamusTo bea brain structure containing several small areas that perform a variety of functions, including regulating hunger and sexual behavior, and connecting the nervous system to the endocrine system via the pituitary gland.Through numerous interactions with other parts of the brain, the hypothalamus helps regulate body temperature, hunger, thirst, and sex drive, and responds to the satisfaction of these needs by producing feelings of pleasure. Olds and Milner (1954) discovered these reward centers after briefly stimulating the rat hypothalamus. The researchers found that after the stimulation, the rat continued to move to the exact spot in its cage where the stimulus occurred, as if trying to recreate the circumstances of the experience. Examining these reward centers further, Olds (1958) found that animals would do almost anything to replicate a pleasurable stimulus, including crossing a painful electrical grid to receive it. In one experiment, a rat was given the opportunity to stimulate its own hypothalamus by pressing a pedal. The rat enjoyed the experience so much that he stepped on the pedal more than 7,000 times an hour until he collapsed from exhaustion.

Thatwalrusconsiststwo “horns” curved backwards from the amygdala. The important walrus inStore information in long-term memory. When the hippocampus is damaged, a person cannot form new memories, but instead lives in a strange world where everything they experience simply disappears, even if older memories from before the injury remain untouched.

The cerebral cortex generates consciousness and thought

All animals have adapted to their environment by developing skills that help them survive. Some animals have hard shells, others run extremely fast, and some have good hearing. Humans don’t have any special qualities, but we do have one major advantage over other animals – we’re very, very intelligent.

You might think that we could determine an animal’s intelligence by looking at the ratio of an animal’s brain weight to its total body weight. But that doesn’t really work. An elephant’s brain is one-thousandth its weight, but a whale’s brain is only one-tenth its body weight. On the other hand, although the human brain is one-sixtieth its body weight, the rat brain is one-forty-fourth its body weight. Despite these comparisons, elephants don’t appear to be ten times smarter than whales, and humans are certainly smarter than mice.

The key to advanced human intelligence is not the size of our brains. What separates humans from other animals is that we are largercortical-the cortex-like outer covering of the brain that enables us to use language successfully, acquire complex skills, make tools, and live in social groups(Gibson, 2002). In humans, the cerebral cortex is wrinkled and folded instead of being smooth like most other animals. This creates a much larger surface area and size, allowing for improved learning, memory, and thinking. The folding of the cerebral cortex is calledcortical.

Although the cerebral cortex is only about 1/10th of an inch thick, it makes up more than 80% of the brain’s weight. The cerebral cortex contains approximately 20 billion neurons and 300 trillion synaptic connections (de Courten-Myers, 1999). All these neurons are supported by billionsglial cells(glia),the cells that surround and attach to nerve cells, protect them, nourish them, and take up unused neurotransmitters. Glia come in different shapes and have different functions. For example, the myelin sheath that surrounds the axons of many neurons is a type of glial cell. Glia are an essential partner of neurons, without which neurons cannot survive or function (Miller, 2005).

The cerebral cortex is divided into twohemisphereand each hemisphere is divided into fourLoyal, each compartment is separated by so-called foldscracks. When we look at the cerebral cortex, which begins at the front of the brain and extends to the top (see Figure 4.9, “Two hemispheres”), we see firstfrontal lobes(behind the forehead)is primarily responsible for thinking, planning, memory and judgment. Behind it is the frontal lobeparietal lobe,extends from the middle to the back of the head and is primarily responsible for processing tactile information. Then comeoccipital lobe at the back of the head, where visual information is processed. Finally, in front of the occipital lobe (rather between the ears) is thetemporal lobe,primarily responsible for hearing and speech.

""Figure 4.9 Two hemispheres. The brain is divided into two hemispheres (left and right) each with four lobes (temporal, frontal, occipital and parietal). In addition, there are specific cortical areas that control various processes.

Functions of the cerebral cortex

When the German physicists Gustav Fritsch and Eduard Hitzig (1870/2009) subjected different parts of the dog’s cerebral cortex to a mild electrical stimulation, they discovered that they could make different parts of the body move the dog’s body. They also discovered an important and surprising principle of how the brain works. They found that stimulation of the right side of the brain elicited movements on the left side of the dog’s body and vice versa. This finding comes from a general principle known as how the brain is structuredside control,meaningThe brain is so interconnected that in most cases the left side of the brain receives and controls sensations from the right side of the body and vice versa.

""Figure 4.10 Sensory and motor cortex. The part of the sensory and motor cortex dedicated to receiving messages controls specific regions of the body, which are determined by the amount of fine movement that region can perform. Therefore, the hands and fingers have as much space in the cerebral cortex as they do in the entire trunk of the body.

Fritsch and Hitzig also found that the brain’s arousal motion only occurred when they stimulated a specific dome-shaped region that ran from ear to ear across the top of the brain, just in front of the parietal lobe (see Figure 4.10, “Sensory and motor cortex” ). Fritsch and Hitzig found outmotor cortex,the part of the cerebral cortex that controls and executes body movements by sending signals to the cerebellum and spinal cord. Recent studies have mapped the motor cortex more fully by stimulating different regions of the motor cortex with mild electronic stimulation in fully awake patients while observing the movements of the motor cortex and their body’s response (since the brain has no sensory receptors, these patients feel no pain). As you can see in Figure 4.10, Sensory and motor cortices, this study showed that the motor cortex is specialized in giving control over the body; H. About body parts that require more precise and delicate movements, such as hands, are also allocated for the largest amount of cortical space.

Just as the motor cortex sends messages to specific parts of the body,feeling of physical pain,An area just behind and parallel to the motor cortex at the back of the frontal lobe that receives information from the skin’s sensory receptors and the movements of different parts of the body. The same applies here: The more sensitive the body region, the more regions are assigned to it in the sensory cortex. For example, our sensitive lips occupy a large area in the sensory cortex, as do our fingers and genitals.

Different areas of the cerebral cortex process different types of sensory information. Thatvisual cortexTo bethe area in the occipital lobe (at the back of the brain) that processes visual information. When you have stimulation in your visual cortex, you see flashes of light or color, and you probably recall the experience of “seeing the stars” when you were nudged or fell on your side behind your head. The temporal lobes, located at the bottom of each hemisphere, containauditory cortex,responsible for hearing and speech. The temporal lobe also processes some visual information and gives us the ability to name objects in the environment (Martin, 2007).

The motor and sensory regions of the cerebral cortex make up a relatively small portion of the total cortical regions. The rest of the cerebral cortex consists oflink area in which sensory and motor information is combined and linked to our stored knowledge. These associative areas are the places in the brain responsible for most of the things that make people human. The associative domains relate to higher mental functions such as learning, reasoning, planning, judgment, moral reflection, visualization, and spatial reasoning.

Flexible Brain: Neuroplasticity

Control over certain bodily functions such as movement, vision and hearing is exercised in specific regions of the cerebral cortex and when these areas are damaged it is likely that the individual will no longer be able to perform the relevant function. For example, if an infant has damaged facial recognition areas in the temporal lobes, it is likely that the infant will never recognize faces (Farah, Rabinowitz, Quinn,neuroplasticitymentionthe ability to change the structure and function of the brain in response to experience or injury. Neuroplasticity allows us to learn and remember new things and adapt to new experiences.

Our brains are most “plastic” when we’re young, because that’s when we learn the most about the world around us. On the other hand, neuroplasticity continues to be observed in adults (Kolb

Plasticity is also observed when there is damage to the brain or parts of the body that are expressed in the motor and sensory cortex. When a tumor in the left brain impairs language, the right brain begins to compensate to restore language ability (Thiel et al., 2006). And when a person loses a finger, the sensory cortex, which previously received information from the missing finger, begins receiving input from neighboring fingers, causing the remaining fingers to become more sensitive, more sensitive to touch (Fox, 1984).

Although neurons cannot repair or regenerate like skin or blood vessels, new evidence suggests the brain may be involved.neurogenesis,the formation of new nerve cells(Van Praag, Zhao, Gage,

Research Focus: Identifying the unique functions of the left and right hemispheres in the split-brain patient

We have seen that the left side of the brain mainly perceives and controls muscle movements on the right side of the body and vice versa. This fact provides an interesting way to studybrain chemistry-the idea that the left and right hemispheres of the brain are specialized to perform different functions. Gazzaniga, Bogen, and Sperry (1965) studied a patient named W.J. who was undergoing surgery to relieve severe seizures. during this operationthe area that normally connects the two hemispheres of the brain and supports communication between the hemispheres, namedcorpus callosum, was cut. The result is that the patient essentially becomes a person with two separate brains. Because the left and right hemispheres are separate, each hemisphere develops a distinct mind with its own set of feelings, concepts, and motivations (Gazzaniga, 2005).

In their study, Gazzaniga and colleagues tested W.J.’s ability to perceive and respond to objects and passages presented only in the left or right hemisphere of the brain (see Fig. 4.11, Verbal and visual processing in patients with dissociated brains “). . The researchers asked W.J. to look straight ahead and then flash a geometrically shaped photo to the left of where he was looking for a split second. By doing this, they ensured that – since the two hemispheres were separate – the image of the shape was only perceived in the right brain hemisphere (remember, sensory input is sent from the left side of the body to the right side of the brain). Gazzaniga and his colleagues discovered that when asked to select objects from a series of shapes with his left hand, W.J. could determine what was shown to him, but was unable to do so when the object was displayed on the right became. field of view. On the other hand, W.J. could easily read written material presented in the right visual field (and thus experiences in the left hemisphere) but not when presented in the left visual field. .

""Fig. 4.11 Verbal and visual processing in patients with split brain. Information presented on the left side of our field of vision is relayed to the right side of the brain and vice versa. In split brain patients, the severed corpus luteum does not allow communication between the hemispheres, allowing researchers to learn more about the functions of each hemisphere. In the left sample, the split-brain patient could not choose which image was presented because the left brain was unable to process visual information. In the right sample, the patient cannot read the passage because the right hemisphere cannot process speech.

This and many other studies that have followed have shown that the two hemispheres of the brain specialize in different abilities. For most people, the ability to speak, write, and understand language resides in the left hemisphere of the brain. Because of this, W.J. can read passages that are presented on the right side and thus transmitted to the left hemisphere, but cannot read passages that are only experienced in the right hemisphere. The left hemisphere is also better at math and judging time and rhythm. It’s also excellent at coordinating the sequence of complex movements – for example, lip movements needed to speak. On the other hand, the right hemisphere of the brain has very limited ability to speak, but excels in perceptual ability. The right brain can recognize objects, including faces, patterns, and sounds, and it can put together a puzzle or draw a picture. Therefore, W.J. could recognize the image when he saw it on the left, but not in the frame on the right.

Although Gazzaniga’s research showed that the brain is actually late-form, i.e. the two hemispheres specialize in different activities, this does not mean that when people behave in a certain way or perform a certain activity, they only use one hemisphere at a time. That would greatly simplify the concept of brain differentiation. We often use both hemispheres at the same time, and the difference between the capabilities of the two hemispheres is not absolute (Soroker et al., 2005).

Psychology in everyday life: Why are some people left-handed?

Across cultures and ethnicities, about 90% of people are predominantly right-handed, while only 10% are predominantly left-handed (Peters, Reimers,

At least part of handedness is genetic. Ultrasound showed that 9 out of 10 fetuses sucked the thumb of the right hand, suggesting a predetermined preference (Hepper, Wells,

But culture also plays a role. Historically, left-handed children were forced to write with their right hand in many countries, and this practice continues, particularly in collectivist cultures such as India and Japan, where left-handedness is viewed negatively compared to individualistic socialists. for example. like Canada and the United States. For example, India has about half as many left-handers as the United States (Ida

In a world where most people are right-handed, being left-handed has both advantages and disadvantages. One problem for left-handers is that the world is made for right-handers. ATMs (cash dispensers), desks, scissors, microscopes, drill presses, and table saws are just a few examples of everyday machines equipped with key controls on the right-hand side. . This may partially explain why left-handed people have more accidents than right-handed people (Dutta

Despite the potential difficulties of living and working in a right-handed world, left-handers still seem to have some advantages. Several famous artists throughout history have been left-handed, including Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Pablo Picasso, and Max Escher. Because the right hemisphere is superior in visual and visual abilities, there may be an advantage to using the left hand for drawing or painting (Springer

In sports where forehand can be important, like tennis, boxing, fencing, or judo, left-handed players may have an advantage. They play a lot of right-handed games and learn how to best use their style. However, right-handers play very few games with left-handers, which can make them more vulnerable. This explains why left-handers are disproportionately found in sports where direct one-actions predominate. In other sports like golf, there are fewer left-handers because your forehand doesn’t affect the competition.

The fact that left-handed people excel in some sports raises the possibility that they may also have an evolutionary advantage, since their ancestors may have been more successful at key skills like two-handed combat (Bodmer

Important lessons learned

  • The old brain—which includes the brainstem, medulla, pons, reticular formation, thalamus, cerebellum, amygdala, hypothalamus, and hippocampus—regulates basic survival functions such as breathing, movement, rest, feeding, emotions, and memory.
  • The cerebral cortex, made up of billions of neurons and glial cells, is divided into right and left hemispheres and four lobes.
  • The frontal lobe is primarily responsible for thinking, planning, memory, and judgment. The parietal lobe is primarily responsible for the body’s sensations and touch. The temporal lobes are primarily responsible for hearing and speech. The occipital lobe is primarily responsible for vision. Other areas of the cerebral cortex function as associative regions responsible for integrating information.
  • The brain changes based on experience and potential damage in a process known as plasticity. The brain can create new neurons through neurogenesis.
  • The motor cortex controls voluntary movements. The parts of the body that require the most control and dexterity take up the most space in the motor cortex.
  • The sensory cortex receives and processes bodily sensations. The most sensitive parts of the body take up the most space in the sensory cortex.
  • The left brain hemisphere is primarily responsible for speech and language in most people, while the right brain hemisphere specializes in spatial and perceptual skills, visualization, and recognition of patterns, faces, and sounds.
  • Severing the corpuscle that connects the two hemispheres creates a “split-brain patient,” with the effect of creating two separate, working minds in one person.
  • Studies involving split-brain patients have been used to study brain chemistry.
  • Neuroplasticity allows the brain to adapt and change in response to experience or injury.

exercises and critical thinking

  1. Do you think animals feel emotions? What aspects of brain structure might lead you to believe they are or not?
  2. Consider your own experiences and speculate about which parts of your brain might have been particularly well developed as a result of those experiences.
  3. Which side of your brain are you likely to use when looking for a fork in a cutlery drawer? Which side of your brain are you most likely to use when trying to remember an old friend’s name?
  4. Do you think it’s a good idea to encourage left-handed children to use their right hand? Why or why not?

moderator

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Thiel, A., Habedank, B., Herholz, K., Kessler, J., Winhuisen, L., Haupt, WF.,Brain and Language, 98(1), 57-65.

Van Praag, H., Zhao, X., Gage, F.H.,Cognitive Neuroscience(3rd ed., pp. 127–137). Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

image properties

Figure 4.5:Brain Anatomy by Artlessstacey (http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Brain_headBorder.jpg) is in the public domain.

Figure 4.6:Adapted from Wikia Education. (n.d.). cortical. Taken from http://psychology.wikia.com/wiki/Cerebral_cortex

Video tutorials about part of the brain the controls emotions

keywords: #Brainanimation, #Brainbasics, #emotionalresponse, #thinking, #manageemotions, #emotion, #adrenaline, #cortisol, #dopamine, #oxytocin, #serotonin, #motivation, #behaviours, #behaviors, #regulatingemotions, #experience, #fightorflight, #emotionalhijack, #threatandreward, #threat, #reward, #feelingregion, #Behavior(FieldOfStudy), #Control, #Animation(ProfessionalField)

The Sentis Brain Animation Series takes you on a tour of the brain through a series of short and sharp animations.

The fifth in the series explains what is happening in our brains as we experience emotions — both the helpful and unhelpful ones! This empowering animation demonstrates that while sometimes our emotions can ‘hijack’ our rational thinking, we also have the power to manage our emotions with conscious thought.

Who is Sentis? We are a global team assisting individuals and organisations change their lives for the better.

The human mind is our focus and we believe the mind is an individual’s most important performance tool.

We are the world leaders in the application of psychology and neuroscience to safety, leadership development, and wellbeing in the workplace.

The Sentis Brain Animation Series is the intellectual property of Sentis Pty Ltd and only approved for third party use under a formal licensing agreement. If you are interested in licensing Sentis videos, please submit your request here:

-https://sentis.com.au/sentis-video-licensing-request

keywords: #brain, #flippingyourlid, #flipyourlid, #handbrainmodel, #emotionalregulation, #mindfulness, #mindful, #brain-based, #emotions, #children, #kids, #cognition, #regulation, #model, #self-regulation, #adhd, #danseigel, #zonesofregulation, #resilience, #mindup, #mindup, #socialemotional, #anxiety, #social, #feelings, #strategies, #executivefunctions

Simple, easy-to-understand whiteboard animation to help early Elementary-aged children gain an understanding of the way their brains work to recognize and manage their emotions. This is intended as a beginning resource to help children, parents, educators, and those who work with children to encourage mindfulness, empathy, and emotional regulation.

The Hand/Brain Model included in the video is a concept by Dr. Dan Siegel. More information on “Flipping your Lid” and the Hand/Brain model can be found at

-www.drdansiegel.com.

Other excellent resources include:

Zones of Regulation: www.zonesofregulation.com

Mind UP: www.mindup.org

California Department of Education – Social Emotional Development:

-http://www.cde.ca.gov/sp/cd/re/itf09socemodev.asp

Developing Self Regulating Learners:

-http://www.pearsoncanada.ca/media/highered-showcase/multi-product-showcase/butler-preface.pdf

Mindful Schools: www.mindfulschools.org

Building Resilience in Children:

-http://www.heysigmund.com/building-resilience-children/

Calm, Alert and Learning:

-https://self-reg.ca/self-reg/books/calm-alert-learning/

keywords:

keywords: #TEDTalks, #Emotions, #Brain, #Humanity, #PersonalGrowth, #Science, #Society

Can you look at someone’s face and know what they’re feeling? Does everyone experience happiness, sadness and anxiety the same way? What are emotions anyway? For the past 25 years, psychology professor Lisa Feldman Barrett has mapped facial expressions, scanned brains and analyzed hundreds of physiology studies to understand what emotions really are. She shares the results of her exhaustive research — and explains how we may have more control over our emotions than we think.

Check out more TED Talks:

-http://www.ted.com

The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more.

Follow TED on Twitter:

-http://www.twitter.com/TEDTalks

Like TED on Facebook:

-https://www.facebook.com/TED

Subscribe to our channel:

-https://www.youtube.com/TED

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